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ac1647
06-24-2011, 11:54 AM
Hi Guys,

I have a dilemma that I'm hoping someone on here has addressed before. Basically, I just received my EZ One yesterday, and it's time to decide where to locate it. The issue is I have a full unfinished basement, about 25'x40', and a very old 2 car garage about 20'x20'.

Up until this point, I've been using a set of 50" rails and recently the ripsizer, all out in the garage. The garage is in bad shape though (it was one of those pre-fab units you could buy from the sears catalogue after WWII) and it's power consists of a single 12 wire jumped off the house. I run two overhead shop lights and the CS, but leave the door open as my dust collection (I know, I have a dust collector, but it would trip the breaker)

My basement has ground level access, (2) 20 amp circuits deidcated to my tools, and stays about 20 degrees cooler than the outside. Floors and walls are concrete. It gets water in extreme rain, but only an inch or so in places.

I guess my question is: Can the EZ One, if I equip my saw with a Shop-Vac/HEPA filter/Dust Deputy, be made to capture the majoirty of the dust? I'm ignoring the noise factor for the time being since my house is old and dampens the sound well enough. I've read a lot of pros/cons about basement shops on other forums, but I'm thinking the EZ-One is it's own special breed and might do enough functions, in one spot, to make it the primary tool. So for those with the EZ-One, if you had better light/heat/space in a basement shop, would you attempt it with the tool?

Thanks for any feedback,
Adam

jswingchun
06-24-2011, 12:53 PM
If I had the space in basement I wouldn't have a problem using the EZOne inside. My dust collection at the tools works very well and I supplement with a DIY overhead filter. If I were setting up inside I would have both for sure.

Here is the DIY overhead filter I built. Look at the second one, not the first one.
http://www.kevinsbrady.net/DustCollection.html#6

If I were doing the filter over, I might consider doing double filters. I would maybe put a super cheapo filter as a pre-filter and then use the higher quality filter behind it. That would make the higher-dollar filters last longer.

I may try to rig something like that up sometime on my current filter.

Dik Harrison
06-24-2011, 12:56 PM
Adam,

My first question would be what kind of access do you have? You have to think about bringing in supplies and taking out projects. If the door is wide enough, I would go with the basement.

Mine is a basement shop, about 900 sq feet (the rest of the basement is storage, finish room, junk). I had a flooding problem (1-2 inches flowing through most of the basement) when we had extremely heavy or prolonged rains, but since I installed a sump pump, haven't had any problems. I have not only an EZ-One but a fair amount of "heavy iron"; a table saw, compound miter saw, radial arm saw, 2-planers, a Shop Smith, jointer, band saw, commercial grade dust collector, and 3-drill presses. I also have a router table, work bench, 3-PBBs that are mostly just used as benches, a 24" shop built drum sander, and a shop built shaper. It is fairly cramped if I don't keep it cleaned up (like now), but I opted to continue to use it even when I had a 900 square foot building built for shop or storage. My only issue is that I can't use it when I wake up early and can't go back to sleep. The noise would bother my wife.

I like not having to go out to the shop, although I have to go out to the barn to get wood. Being below is great in that it really moderates the temperature summer and winter.

bigjohn1
06-24-2011, 04:01 PM
That beats my 135 square foot room lol. In the good weather I do have the driveway.

ac1647
06-24-2011, 04:16 PM
Thanks for the feedback, I'm really glad to know that basement shops aren't so uncommon.

Dik, my access is ok, not great but not terrible. I have a straight path with 3 steps up to a 36" exterior door. Not as nice as opening the garage door, but I could do any assembly outside.

I love the idea of having it naturally cool in the summer, plus in the winter my steam furnace keeps it toasty. My reservations are the dust and the occaisonal humidity, but if i can address those things I might be set. Noise is a concern (don't want to wake the wife and baby) but I've done some sign routing down there in the winter and they could barely hear it.

In terms of dust collection, and running all those heavy dust makers (like the planer), how do you address the risk of the dust combusting? I'm always concerned in the garage, but I want to be extra careful inside.

As far as the overhead filters, the model shown in the links is awesome, thanks for tip I may make one first.

Randal Stevenson
06-25-2011, 02:39 AM
The overhead air cleaner, doesn't just have to be overhead. Some of us have short ceilings, and I once saw one locally, made into a down draft sanding table/air cleaner. Just another option.
The circular saw gets most of the dust with Dino's mod's. Enough that I wouldn't worry too much. The router however, is going to be throwing up chips and stuff. Planers and jointers throw out chips, and sanders can kick up fine dust, even with a attached hose. You will need a shop vac for the smaller tools, and a true dust collector (recommend either a Thein adaption, a Pentz cyclone, or a decent store bought one) for the larger tools.
Don't think you have to be limited to one area. You could just as easily do your cutting in the basement, planning and jointing in the garage, and finishing, wherever it won't bother you or the wife (smell, through the furnace).
One think a neighbor has done, is build a tent of sorts, with clear painters, plastic drop cloths. He has two layers with the openings offset, as his shop, is 10x10 and basically at the backside of the furnace.

Burt
06-25-2011, 04:22 PM
Adam,

I'm with DIk on liking the basement shop but in the area I live, the water table is to high.

The first problem is humidity: It sounds like you would need a sump pump and very possibily a de-humidifier. I made some doors for a gentleman who was having problems with the A/c in his house. There was so much humidity that the doors swelled and broke the joints. After a few days laying in the shop the doors was fine.

Dust: Depending on how the house is built it might be able to travel up stairs.

Heat a/c: If I read correctly, you have steam heat - as in radiators. If this is the case there won't be any open vents in the basement to carry the dust all thru the house.

Also we have no idea of where you live so we have no idea how hot it might get in the summer or how cold it might get in the winter.

A note to Adam and all the new people on the forum: I know that it is only normal to want to maintain your privacy and most of us do it when joining a new forum. From my perspective, it helps a lot to know where a person is located. I've met people on the forum that live less than a mile from me.


Burt

Dik Harrison
06-25-2011, 06:24 PM
Thanks, Burt, I forgot, I have a dehumidifier in the shop and one in the rest of the basement. I would have a dehumidifier in the barn if I were to use that as a shop, just part of living in the south (even if we are having a bit of a drought).

ac1647
06-26-2011, 03:13 AM
Thanks again for all the feedback, I'm thinking basement is the way to go for me.

To give a better idea what i'm dealing with, I'm in southeast Pennsylvania, so colder winters and warm to hot summers but nothing too extreme. Humidity was a huge problem, but I run a de-humidifier constantly to keep it managed. The sump keeps the water out unless we get 5+ inches of rain.

I like Randal's point, I can dedicate the garage to the planer and sanders and do the EZ cutting in the basement.

Dust has me the most nervous. I've read through all of Bill Pentz's research and I worry about that fine dust in my living space. I currently run a ryobi cicular saw on my rail with a dust deputy and a shop vac equipped with a Cleanstream filter. Cleanstream claims effectiveness down to 0.3 microns. I also have a harbor freight 2 hp dust collector with a wynn environmental cartridge filter good to 0.5 microns. I can't use the DC in the garage, since the whole thing is running off a single 20amp circuit. Don't know why the old owner did that, seems awfully junior varsity for a garage. So the DC sits idle now and I use the shop vac in the garage. I'm thinking I could run both in the basement, possiblly with a
wide mouth collector mounted to the EZ One and going to the DC. I'd run a
Air filter/ circulator too, a 1000 cfm would seem fine.

This is sort of a new question I suppose but effects the basement\garage decision. Is the a good fine dust collection setup for the ez one? I would have thought the biggest fine dust risk came from sanders or maybe planers, but pentz's work suggests all tools need high cfm dust collection to minimize the fine stuff. There isn't any ductwork (all steam pipe radiators) so that's helpful, but I want to avoid the hazards as much as I can, its why I use ez in the first place.

Thanks again for the advice its much appreciated.

ChrisW
06-26-2011, 11:41 AM
I like Randal's point, I can dedicate the garage to the planer and sanders and do the EZ cutting in the basement.



for me:
Garage: Planer, stationary sander, jointer, concrete countertop tools, Ez-One
Basement: table saw, drill press, router table, band saw, lathe, scroll saw, etc.

The EZ-One is going to stay in the garage to handle larger stock. However, a smart guide on a narrow smart table may make it into the basement for winter work. I use my miter saw there for crosscutting.

You could always move your EZ-one as needed depending on your project(s) and the time of year. Once you become familiar with the EZ-One, I think that you will realize that it is not that difficult to move from one spot to the other.

Randal Stevenson
06-26-2011, 12:24 PM
for me:
Garage: Planer, stationary sander, jointer, concrete countertop tools, Ez-One
Basement: table saw, drill press, router table, band saw, lathe, scroll saw, etc.

The EZ-One is going to stay in the garage to handle larger stock. However, a smart guide on a narrow smart table may make it into the basement for winter work. I use my miter saw there for crosscutting.

You could always move your EZ-one as needed depending on your project(s) and the time of year. Once you become familiar with the EZ-One, I think that you will realize that it is not that difficult to move from one spot to the other.

Or use the Smart table and tracks for the larger boards, in the garage and use the EZ one (when/if he eventually buy's or makes one), for the smaller pieces in the basement.
The whole trick, is getting started, as one can adjust (it isn't like these are big heavier iron pieces).:)