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View Full Version : t-track accessory mods, DIY bridge, DIY ssrk, newbie questions


Goblu
02-24-2012, 09:52 PM
Hi all,

Iím new here and new to woodworking. I found out about the EZ system only a few weeks ago. WOW! Very limited budget, but when I saw the extrusions sale I bought some extrusions to make a DIY PBB and perhaps make a few jigs. I have lots of questions, but will start with a few.

1. Can accessories like flip stops that were designed for t-track be used in the ez system? It looks like I could replace the part that rides in the t-track with a small piece of the ez connector or ez ridged connector. Is there anything special Iíd need to know to do this?

2. Can I make a basic bridge myself? Is there a post/video where this is described?

3. Can I make a basic SSRK by purchasing the router base and using some extrusions? Is there a post/video?

4. Can I use an EZ Smart base for my older B&D CS (its base is about 5 1/2Ē wide) and later use the same EZ Smart base when I can afford to upgrade to a better saw?

5. Is there anything I need to know to successfully cut/thread the aluminum extrusions? I donít want to damage them or mess up the ends.

6. Which are better to start, the smart clamps or the long clamps? Iím going to order two for now.

7. How important are the squaring stops? Can I make my own and will they work ok for now?

Iím very new to woodworking and have taken some classes in the last year, making some hardwood raised panel cabinet doors (cope and stick), dovetail drawers, carcases, etc. using the school equipment. Before that Iíd never used a table saw, bandsaw, router, shaper, or power miter saw. Donít laugh, but Iíd never heard of a router, jointer, or big planer. Iíve done a lot of DIY home repair stuff over the years, using drills, circular saws, jigsaws, etc. Iíve always bought fixer-uppers to live in and done the fixing over time.

I fell in love with woodworking in these classes except that the table saw and radial arm saw seemed too risky and so did the router and miter saw in some applications. I made some cathedral raised panel doors on a shaper using a jig that was partially freehand and sweated the whole time. ďNever again, not worth the risk,Ē I said to myself. I was trying to figure out which jigs I might build to make things safer and then ran across the EZ system. Like I said, Wow!
I just found out about EZ at the end of the extrusions sale. I ordered some extrusions without totally understanding them, but saw the PBB DIY post by Dino and thought I could start there. Thanks, Dino, for the brilliant system, and for the DIY PBB post!

Iíve read many of the posts and some of it is starting to make sense. I appreciate the helpful posts of everyone and the videos. I was nearly late to work the other morning because of a fascinating EZ video :D.

Katie

bumpnstump
02-25-2012, 01:17 PM
Katie, thanks for posting on the forum- welcome.
I'll just take a quick swipe at addressing some of your questions:

1. Can accessories like flip stops that were designed for t-track be used in the ez system? It looks like I could replace the part that rides in the t-track with a small piece of the ez connector or ez ridged connector. Is there anything special Iíd need to know to do this?

Shouldn't be too difficult. Basically, the ez- connector is like the t-track connector, only, it's make to work with the EZ extrusions, obviously. To fit your specific needs, you'll just need to experiment, but the answer will probably jump out at you when you have everything sitting in front of you.

2. Can I make a basic bridge myself? Is there a post/video where this is described?

No video that I know of, and, 'yes' you can make your own bridge. A number of folks here on the forum have done that. Ez started out with a simpler bridge (the B-100) than what is offered now (the B-300), and some have made their own variations, based on the pivoting/raising principles of the bridges.

3. Can I make a basic SSRK by purchasing the router base and using some extrusions? Is there a post/video?

Again, no video that I know of re. how to make one, just videos of one in use. On this one, tho, you might want to start out with the SSRK that EZ offers- they've 'done the math' already, and it works like it should.
But, yes, you can make your own.
One of the neat things re. EZ extrusions is that they are great 'building' blocks that allow you to make most anything you can think of. If you get to a 'stick-point' in a creative innovation, there's lots of folks on the forum who can help. I've found that it helps me to 'just get started' when I have an idea. Then, in the making of it, I discover better/different ways to accomplish the same thing.

4. Can I use an EZ Smart base for my older B&D CS (its base is about 5 1/2Ē wide) and later use the same EZ Smart base when I can afford to upgrade to a better saw?

Yes.

5. Is there anything I need to know to successfully cut/thread the aluminum extrusions? I donít want to damage them or mess up the ends.

The basics: make sure you wear protective gear (glasses; ear plugs); make sure you clamp your material securely when cutting/drilling; don't rush; etc. (I'm hoping the machinist on this forum will chime in......)
In my set-up, it goes like this when I'm cutting extrusions and then tapping them:
-sometime I cut first, sometime I drill/tap first- just depends on the specific project, and how I'm wanting to 'attack' it.
-When I cut, I have a metal cutting bandsaw, but the teeth often clog when cutting aluminum, so I often use my circular, or my miter saw. Make sure your material is clamped securely; cut slowly.
-I usually drill a 1/8" starter hole first before going to a larger drill bit. A bit safer, plus, it's easier for me to get everything placed correctly. Also, I use a drill press. Not a necessity, but sure makes things straight and nice. Final hole drilling should be the size required by the tap size.
-Before tapping, I run a countersink around both sides of the hole, just to chamfer the edges a bit and keep things clean and neat.
-I own a fairly inexpensive set of taps, but they work fine. I tap by hand (ie. not using the drill press under power). I lubricate the tap with some penetrant oil I have here (Kroil, by Kano Labs- other similar oils work.)
- from there it's a matter of just doing it. Keep the tap straight into the hole (sometimes, I'll put the tap into the drill press chuck and turn the chuck by hand as I'm levering it into the hole to be tapped). On thicker aluminum, you'll probably be able to advance the tap a little, before needing to reverse direction to clean out the swarf (chips created by the cutting action). Keep going in this manner till you're through.
It's a bit like everything else: once you do it, it's not as 'scary', and becomes a no-brainer.

6. Which are better to start, the smart clamps or the long clamps? Iím going to order two for now.

Depends on your needs, but most find that they only ever need the smart clamps, with minimal need for the long clamps. I so infrequently need long clamps, that when I do need them, I use quick-clamps instead.
re. smart clamps: I'm not sure one can ever have enough- they are totally handy. I'm hoping that one day EZ will offer a 'cheaper-by-the-dozen' sale on them (hint-hint)

7. How important are the squaring stops? Can I make my own and will they work ok for now?

Squaring stops, really, all kinds of stops, with the EZ set-up makes doing projects quicker and more accurate. Yes, you can make your own. They can be any size/shape, out of almost any material, and made to do whatever you want them to do.

I realize I may not have addressed all that you were asking, but I think others will chime in to add their wisdom/experience. I've found that the best/quickest way to dive into the EZ 'deep end of the pool', is to just get going. Start with what you have, think about what you want to do with it, and then go for it. Ask for help on the forum; post your solutions; have fun.
With EZ, there's no 'one-way' to do it. It's more like: 'How do I use/adapt EZ to address my task?'

Hope some of this helps,
Rick

Randal Stevenson
02-25-2012, 04:10 PM
Katie, what did you order? Do you have any guide rails?

The reason I ask, is the kits come with guide rails, the saw base, and two Smart clamps. (good start) I am going to jump around a bit, and start with question number 6. Start with the Smart clamps, and when/if you need the Long Smart clamps, replace the center threaded section with a longer piece of all thread. You will have to use some heat probably to break the seal from the thread locker (heat gun). There are some members and users who need the large clamps all the time, one uses a 16" beam saw, so they need the large clamps. Since you list your saw ans and older B&D I figure you have a typical 7 1/4" saw (however could be an older 10" that I haven't seen for a long time, then you need a Moduni base instead of the normal base)

1. Yes you can replace the T track with a connector, but you may have to make a riser for the flip stops to attach to. I tried to find an old video with these and it looks like that website is no more (graspr.com and the video was the crosscutter as it and the PBB had flip stops)

2. Several people have built Bx00. I can think of one B100 and one B300 off the top of my head and am trying to find the posts. There can be a few reasons to do this; budget being the biggest.
This is a link to one members: http://tracksawforum.com/showpost.php?p=3876&postcount=28
Towards the top right, is a hyperlink which takes you to the whole thread. I haven't found the picture of the homemade B100 yet. (may have been from another, now dead forum) There are more photo's in that post that should be of interest.

One more link that may be of interest: http://tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=641

3. Making the SRK or SSRK would be tricky, IMHO. I remember one member made one on the dead sawmillcreek forum (manufacturers forum, no longer accessible), and he was a machinist, who used left over 80/20 extrusions.
In my view, I would either call and see if he had any old SRK's to closeout before moving, or plan on saving while watching the classifieds.
It can be done, but it is certainly easier to make one, with one.

4 Use screws and not the tape. It will be easier to swap then.

5. See above post. If your not afraid to work with aluminum, cutting, tapping etc., your a head of the game. Also look up Eurekazone on Youtube, as I believe he may still have some aluminum video's there, since the other video site is no longer.


I don't know of any how to copy video's as that could fall in the patent infringement category. Others have made things as they need them and budget or time constraints don't allow, but your not likely to get the patent owner to post go a head and make all you want, and give up his patent rights; and WELCOME.



Now to some other posters, seems to me we have a poster who was excited by finding the EZ one and its capabilities, yet doesn't seem to have track rail experience. We seem to have had this discussion lately.:confused:

Burt
02-25-2012, 04:26 PM
Hi all,

Iím new here and new to woodworking. I found out about the EZ system only a few weeks ago. WOW! Very limited budget, but when I saw the extrusions sale I bought some extrusions to make a DIY PBB and perhaps make a few jigs. I have lots of questions, but will start with a few.

1. Can accessories like flip stops that were designed for t-track be used in the ez system? It looks like I could replace the part that rides in the t-track with a small piece of the ez connector or ez ridged connector. Is there anything special Iíd need to know to do this?

Yes, I currently have some made for a uni saw that I am using. I haven't found anything that will fit "Out of the box".

2. Can I make a basic bridge myself? Is there a post/video where this is described?

Yes, you can make your own. I have made several.

3. Can I make a basic SSRK by purchasing the router base and using some extrusions? Is there a post/video?

I haven't tried this one. It could be done but there are some tight tolerances.

4. Can I use an EZ Smart base for my older B&D CS (its base is about 5 1/2Ē wide) and later use the same EZ Smart base when I can afford to upgrade to a better saw?

The EZ Smart base fits almost everything. I have taken several off one saw and put it on another.

5. Is there anything I need to know to successfully cut/thread the aluminum extrusions? I donít want to damage them or mess up the ends.

I've had to learn this one on my own. Rick gave some good guidance

6. Which are better to start, the smart clamps or the long clamps? Iím going to order two for now.

SInce the budget is tight start with the regular smart clampe.

7. How important are the squaring stops? Can I make my own and will they work ok for now?

Anything attached to the SME can work as a squaring stop. I've used all sorts of things.


Iím very new to woodworking and have taken some classes in the last year, making some hardwood raised panel cabinet doors (cope and stick), dovetail drawers, carcases, etc. using the school equipment. Before that Iíd never used a table saw, bandsaw, router, shaper, or power miter saw. Donít laugh, but Iíd never heard of a router, jointer, or big planer. Iíve done a lot of DIY home repair stuff over the years, using drills, circular saws, jigsaws, etc. Iíve always bought fixer-uppers to live in and done the fixing over time.

I fell in love with woodworking in these classes except that the table saw and radial arm saw seemed too risky and so did the router and miter saw in some applications. I made some cathedral raised panel doors on a shaper using a jig that was partially freehand and sweated the whole time. ďNever again, not worth the risk,Ē I said to myself. I was trying to figure out which jigs I might build to make things safer and then ran across the EZ system. Like I said, Wow!
I just found out about EZ at the end of the extrusions sale. I ordered some extrusions without totally understanding them, but saw the PBB DIY post by Dino and thought I could start there. Thanks, Dino, for the brilliant system, and for the DIY PBB post!

Iíve read many of the posts and some of it is starting to make sense. I appreciate the helpful posts of everyone and the videos. I was nearly late to work the other morning because of a fascinating EZ video :D.

Katie

Katie,

These guys have done a super job of answering your questions, I'll see if I can add a little.


Welcome to the EZ World!!!!!



Burt

Goblu
02-27-2012, 11:36 PM
Thank you all for answering my questions so clearly and also for the great welcome!!! I would have posted sooner but was mostly offline for a while, then caught a bug. :eek:

Rick, you addressed a lot more than I'd hoped for! I’m realizing that I need to learn to work with metal to make best use of the EZ system. One key to making it work uniquely for one’s own needs seems to be learning this. Your detailed explanations will go a long way in giving me a head start from where I was. One of my goals will be to learn how to do it as well as I can. Step-by-step, and always starting with safety is VERY helpful.

I liked your ideas that I'll find my way as I go and determine my needs. I have a lot to learn but at least I have very little to unlearn about the old systems ;).

Randall, so far I’ve only purchased extrusions during the recent sale. My goal was to get them while I could afford enough to make a basic plywood DIY PBB and have some extrusions/connectors for building a bridge, etc. Also an extra portable track. Here’s the list of most of what I have now:

2 pc - 54” tool tracks and a 30” piece
8 pc - 48” SME’s for a 24”x48” DIY PBB
24” each of ridged connector, twin connector, back to back extrusions
48” each of SSME and connector extrusions

Thank you, Randall, for taking time to find those informative links to posts. Very good stuff. I am planning on making my own bridge eventually, but see it is not needed right away since the basics are the track and some clamps. I’m going to get the short clamps based on the opinions of all of you. Also, the SSRK is not something I can tackle at this level, confirming what I thought might be the case. The riser idea is good. I got a little of the ridged connector because I thought it might be useful and perhaps that would be one way to use it.

Burt, it’s helpful to know that you have not found anything that worked “out of the box.” I have some things (t-track and a related few accessories, like stops, featherboards, etc.) and hope to use them as part of the system. I (unfortunately) got these before I discovered EZ and all will likely have to be modified. Another possibility is to mount the t-track in removable top panels for the PBB table and use them that way, or perhaps another way. Too early to tell.

I have some limited access to higher level tools than I now own in the classes I’m taking. There is a good drill press, bandsaw, planer, jointer, large sanders, grinder, miter saw etc. I may be able to use the appropriate ones for cutting metal. The school’s other equipment like the radial arm saw, table saw, shaper/router now seem an unnecessary risk. They do have a track saw which is what introduced the idea to me that there was a safer alternative. So, when I saw the EZ it totally made sense to me but went beyond the track saw I’d tried there. The details still need to become clearer to me as I work with them. I like the EZ heavy extrusions as compared to the track saw at the school.

Again, thanks all of you for the great information!!!! I will work to put something together and am sure I’ll have more questions later. I’ll even post the results which will not be anything like the pros on this forum, but will show other beginners that it can be done on basic levels for new woodworkers, too. It will take some time, though.

Katie

Randal Stevenson
02-28-2012, 03:27 AM
Katie,

Your profile doesn't say where you are.

Over the years, both here, and on another forum, we have had some teachers.
I am wondering if one of them, was the reason you found the EZ and this forum? If not, personally (and I know it is a passion for Dino), I would like to see you invite them over here, as so many schools are loosing that section of learning from their budgets, in part due to rising insurance costs from old tools like the table saw.

And stick around, come around, search the old posts, learn and have fun!

Goblu
02-28-2012, 04:08 AM
Randall, I added my profile location (Michigan, hence my screen name "Go Blue") It's secret code so that only those from Michigan might know ;).

I plan to set up my system and get some work done especially with the router, then show my teacher. I think he'd be more interested in that than the website, though he likes track saws pretty well now for ripping plywood, etc. He has his own business and uses all the tools. It's a continuing ed class, not high school. He's a very good guy, but limited time due to teaching a couple of classes and having his own business. It's a good thought on your part.

Randal Stevenson
02-29-2012, 12:59 AM
Randall, I added my profile location (Michigan, hence my screen name "Go Blue") It's secret code so that only those from Michigan might know ;).

I plan to set up my system and get some work done especially with the router, then show my teacher. I think he'd be more interested in that than the website, though he likes track saws pretty well now for ripping plywood, etc. He has his own business and uses all the tools. It's a continuing ed class, not high school. He's a very good guy, but limited time due to teaching a couple of classes and having his own business. It's a good thought on your part.

I had to look that up. Can't say I am much of a sports fan, yet have had more opportunities then most.
I was hoping your teach
I had to look that up. er was one of our members that I hadn't seen any posts from in a while. I don't think so, as not from that area.

roy_okc
02-29-2012, 01:00 AM
I have some limited access to higher level tools than I now own in the classes Iím taking. There is a good drill press, bandsaw, planer, jointer, large sanders, grinder, miter saw etc. I may be able to use the appropriate ones for cutting metal. The schoolís other equipment like the radial arm saw, table saw, shaper/router now seem an unnecessary risk. They do have a track saw which is what introduced the idea to me that there was a safer alternative. So, when I saw the EZ it totally made sense to me but went beyond the track saw Iíd tried there. The details still need to become clearer to me as I work with them. I like the EZ heavy extrusions as compared to the track saw at the school.

Katie

Katie,

While metal working tools are better, you can cut aluminum with a woodworking circular saw, especially using the track system, or a miter saw. You'll want a carbide tipped blade, but definitely not an expensive one as cutting aluminum will dull the blade much quicker than wood will. Definitely make sure you have good eye protection; I wear safety glasses and a full face shield. Clamp the aluminum down well, then go slow with the saw. The cuts will quickly heat up, so be careful grabbing them. I've made close to 100 cuts in 80/20 aluminum extrusion and soon to cut up some EZ extrusion I bought during the extrusion sale.

Whatever you decide to build, you definitely want to make sure you plan it well due to the cost of the extrusions as it is awful hard to weld aluminum if you cut it too short. You may want to look at starting with a wood PBB to use to help build a better one from aluminum. My first PBB was about 15" x 24" and maybe 9" tall, but worked well even with a B-300 bridge, and I used it to cut some things prior to building my 80/20-based work cart/PBB. No metal cut to make it, mostly scrap wood, no costly materials wasted.

Welcome to the EZ family.

Roy

Goblu
02-29-2012, 02:35 PM
Thank you, Roy. I have considered getting a face shield and think I'll do so now before cutting any metal.

I'm going to build a simple plywood table first and just attach the SME's that I got the sale. I will probably cut one of them in half since I got the 48" length and am planning a 24" x 48" table. After that I want to find more about what I need before I cut any, since they are so expensive.

bhough56
02-29-2012, 04:36 PM
Katie,
Make sure you wear long sleeves when cutting aluminum as well as clamping down your piece and wearing face/eye protection. Those little pieces of aluminum hurt besides being hot and sharp!
Bruce H.

Goblu
03-06-2012, 02:08 AM
Thank you, Bruce. Another good reminder. Wood like oak can be bad enough when it's chipping and flying on certain cuts (with a table saw, that is). I don't want hot metal flying at me :eek: without some kind of good covering.

Well, the table saw is soon to become a thing of the past. . . I don't own one but used it a lot in my classes. I do have a small used contractor's saw, never used by me, that I plan to sell if possible, or perhaps use for parts (solid base, fence, metal top, etc.). just take the blade out and see how it could be used without it. :D

whitejacket
03-06-2012, 02:35 AM
GoBlu(e)
ShopNotes magazine a few years ago had a shop-made drum sander that they set on top of a table saw, attached a pulley to the saw's arbor, and it powered the drum sander. I think if I still had my contractor saw that is the only thing I could see it being used for.....other than as a place to set down my clamps, etc...

Joe

p.s. another Michigan fan (originally from Toledo, Ohio)

Burt
03-06-2012, 03:32 AM
GoBlu(e)
ShopNotes magazine a few years ago had a shop-made drum sander that they set on top of a table saw, attached a pulley to the saw's arbor, and it powered the drum sander. I think if I still had my contractor saw that is the only thing I could see it being used for.....other than as a place to set down my clamps, etc...

Joe

p.s. another Michigan fan (originally from Toledo, Ohio)

Joe,

At one point I was accused of using my unisaw to display my collection of Makita tools.


Burt

Goblu
03-06-2012, 08:54 AM
GoBlu(e)
ShopNotes magazine a few years ago had a shop-made drum sander that they set on top of a table saw, attached a pulley to the saw's arbor, and it powered the drum sander. I think if I still had my contractor saw that is the only thing I could see it being used for.....other than as a place to set down my clamps, etc...

Joe

p.s. another Michigan fan (originally from Toledo, Ohio)

Joe, I like the sander idea, actually. I could make that a next-winter project since the house I'm rennovating is a three-season project at this point. I can use the never-used by me old radial arm saw as a place to store some clamps. ;) Though I don't have a collection of Makita tools to display at this point like Burt does, I do have a lot of old Craftsman tools. I bought the RAS used and then discovered that there was a recall. That must have been a wicked dangerous tool for Emerson to spend so much on the recall remedy for many many models of Craftsman RAS's. Really, the shipping alone was probably more than the saw was worth on the market.

I'll tell you about the Goblu spelling later today. Time to fly or I'll be late for work.

Bruce M
03-06-2012, 11:04 AM
Katie,
I wanted to chime in since I can strongly identify with your search for ways to effectively use the EZ system. I started the process less than 2 yrs ago - I've become a lot more comfortable with what I'm doing, but feel I still have a way to go.

A major goal for me has been to configure a cutting table (aka DIY PBB) that allows me to make good square cuts quickly and repeatably. I didn't have the space or $ for the EZ-1. I used SME to make a 24" x 48" frame and used phenolic ply for the top surface. The ply is flatter/smoother than regular ply and it works well. It's built on a pair of old steel table legs I had. (The legs were the base of a 40 yr old Craftsman RAS I inhereted from my dad - the most dangerous tool on the planet IMO). I find the B-300 bridge to be an invaluable part of the table. Rigging a fence or stops wasn't a big problem. It's not an open-top design like the EZ1 and it's not as flexible as the EZ1, but it works well for my needs. (I've been making built-in cabinets and drawers, and some shelves so far - certainly not a pro like the guys on the forum who do most of the posts.)

My point is to endorse the bridge as an important way to make life easier in making your cuts. I'm at the point of wishing I could afford a second one, although I'll probably reconfigure my table anyway to make it easier to change the sides I have the bridge set on. Until you have a bridge (either the B-300 or a DIY version) you may not need an elaborate PBB. The track can be used for just about anything with a just couple of clamps. The smart table top is great, but sometimes I just put some plywood strips on a table for quick cuts so I don't cut into the table's surface.

I'm interested to know where or what type of school offers the class you're taking. I'd be interested in that myself to get more exposure to vairous tools and techniques, but haven't come across anything like it in my area. Also, I have ties to both MSU and UM - a bit of a foreigner in OSU-land.

Good luck - it seems you're headed in the right direction.
Bruce

bhough56
03-06-2012, 08:45 PM
Katie,
I wanted to chime in since I can strongly identify with your search for ways to effectively use the EZ system. I started the process less than 2 yrs ago - I've become a lot more comfortable with what I'm doing, but feel I still have a way to go.

A major goal for me has been to configure a cutting table (aka DIY PBB) that allows me to make good square cuts quickly and repeatably. I didn't have the space or $ for the EZ-1. I used SME to make a 24" x 48" frame and used phenolic ply for the top surface. The ply is flatter/smoother than regular ply and it works well. It's built on a pair of old steel table legs I had. (The legs were the base of a 40 yr old Craftsman RAS I inhereted from my dad - the most dangerous tool on the planet IMO). I find the B-300 bridge to be an invaluable part of the table. Rigging a fence or stops wasn't a big problem. It's not an open-top design like the EZ1 and it's not as flexible as the EZ1, but it works well for my needs. (I've been making built-in cabinets and drawers, and some shelves so far - certainly not a pro like the guys on the forum who do most of the posts.)

My point is to endorse the bridge as an important way to make life easier in making your cuts. I'm at the point of wishing I could afford a second one, although I'll probably reconfigure my table anyway to make it easier to change the sides I have the bridge set on. Until you have a bridge (either the B-300 or a DIY version) you may not need an elaborate PBB. The track can be used for just about anything with a just couple of clamps. The smart table top is great, but sometimes I just put some plywood strips on a table for quick cuts so I don't cut into the table's surface.

I'm interested to know where or what type of school offers the class you're taking. I'd be interested in that myself to get more exposure to vairous tools and techniques, but haven't come across anything like it in my area. Also, I have ties to both MSU and UM - a bit of a foreigner in OSU-land.

Good luck - it seems you're headed in the right direction.
Bruce

Bruce,
I'm confused, you say you don't have the space for an EZ1 (27"x51") yet you built a PBB 24"x48"?:confused: And then you used a set of legs that are narrower than the table, thus having the possibility of tipping!:confused: Dino works very hard at trying to maintain safety first. You seem to have circumvented the process at no gain! My apologies if this sounds offensive! I'm just confused by your statement.

Goblu
03-06-2012, 10:10 PM
BruceM, I looked briefly for the type of program that might help you in the Cincinnati area. They have one at the University of Cincinnati in their certificate in Wood Technology. Here's a link:
http://www.ceas.uc.edu/special_programs/Certificates/wood_technology.html

There may be others. Mine is through Adult Education (non-credit) and adult ed can be through your local school system, your parks and rec system, community colleges, etc. Usually cheaper than the credit classes. I've taken some thru adult ed years ago to learn basic carpentry skills and electrical wiring skills since I could not afford to hire it done. These were weeks-long, not the one-day classes for DIY which I don't find that helpful in general. I've also taken a credit class in a certificate program like the one above. It is one way to learn good safety if you have a good teacher.

Katie

Bruce M
03-06-2012, 10:21 PM
Bruce, good questions - thanks for asking. First, I bought my first set of aluminum, etc. and started building my table (PBB) about 2 yrs ago. As I recall it was shortly before or around the time the EZ1 was officially introduced. I liked the idea of the EZ1, but didn't want my initial investment to go to waste. The EZ1 would also have cost me hundreds of dollars more, which was a negative factor even if I hadn't already started on my own design.

But, it's still my understanding that the current EZ1 is more like 50" x 50", not 27" x 50". My thought comes from the dimensions of the top frame kit sold in the DIY EZ1 section of the website. The front SSME, where the driver stands to operate the bridge, looks to be 50", and the depgth of the table behind it is at least 48" (the foam beam is listed at 50"). At that size it would be really inconvenient for me to store.

As for the legs I'm using, they are solidly braced (about 20" x 34"), and have no sway or wiggle in them at all.

All that said, if I could find a way to dedicate more square footage to these toys, and the price of the EZ1 keeps dropping, it's still someting I'd consider as it would most likely give me more versatility. In the meantime I try to keep up with the mods that come along.
Bruce

bhough56
03-06-2012, 10:40 PM
Bruce, good questions - thanks for asking. First, I bought my first set of aluminum, etc. and started building my table (PBB) about 2 yrs ago. As I recall it was shortly before or around the time the EZ1 was officially introduced. I liked the idea of the EZ1, but didn't want my initial investment to go to waste. The EZ1 would also have cost me hundreds of dollars more, which was a negative factor even if I hadn't already started on my own design.

But, it's still my understanding that the current EZ1 is more like 50" x 50", not 27" x 50". My thought comes from the dimensions of the top frame kit sold in the DIY EZ1 section of the website. The front SSME, where the driver stands to operate the bridge, looks to be 50", and the depgth of the table behind it is at least 48" (the foam beam is listed at 50"). At that size it would be really inconvenient for me to store.

As for the legs I'm using, they are solidly braced (about 20" x 34"), and have no sway or wiggle in them at all.

All that said, if I could find a way to dedicate more square footage to these toys, and the price of the EZ1 keeps dropping, it's still someting I'd consider as it would most likely give me more versatility. In the meantime I try to keep up with the mods that come along.
Bruce

Bruce,
I'm sorry, I keep forgetting I picked up an extra SSME 27" long that I keep on my EZ1 thus not having the 50"(48") SSME on the table at all times. This keeps my EZ1 at 27" x 51" most of the time. I have the lower SSME's that I have my B300 mounted to. With the expandability of the SME's I can do most cuts by sliding out my SME's and if needed I slide the 50" SSME in and I have the regular EZ1. Again, I apologize, fingers in motion, brain in neutral!

Goblu
03-06-2012, 10:48 PM
Bruce,
I'm confused, you say you don't have the space for an EZ1 (27"x51") yet you built a PBB 24"x48"?:confused: And then you used a set of legs that are narrower than the table, thus having the possibility of tipping!:confused: Dino works very hard at trying to maintain safety first. You seem to have circumvented the process at no gain! My apologies if this sounds offensive! I'm just confused by your statement.

Bruce (bhough56), I appreciate your comments on legs and safety!

I am planning to make a smart table using a pre-existing table with banquet legs. I got such a table for $8 recently, mainly for the good solid legs. Though the table top is cosmetically damaged, it seems sound, so I thought I'd just keep the table and attach some plywood to the top for the smart table kit (a future order). I will pay close attention to the table construction and make sure it's very stable.

I've been pondering legs for the EZ-one/PBB that I'm going to build next. I just ordered the table ends and some other items (with my projected tax refund :)) to fill in what I had so will have a near EZ-one except I have to build the legs from wood and get/build a B-300 some day. I plan to brace them diagonally as I noted in a post that Dik (I think) did. I got the B-100 for now to get started safely.

Bruce M
03-06-2012, 10:48 PM
Bruce, no problem. I guess what you just did was to show that the size of the EZ1 can be tailored for specific needs pretty easily. I'd be interested to know how big a job it is/how long it takes for you to trade the 27" SSME for the 50".
Bruce

Bruce M
03-06-2012, 11:00 PM
Katie, thanks for the link and your comments about classes. My first preference would be toward the non-credit variety, but I'm inspired to do more research in general into what's available in this area.
Bruce

Goblu
03-06-2012, 11:07 PM
BruceH and BruceM, I'm interested in the concept of a shorter SSME for the top, too. I will be using my EZ1/PBB in two locations, one that is quite limited in space and had thought I could perhaps use a 24" size in that location, since I have that size.

So, for Michigan fans, here's the story of my screen name: There was an official state map of Michigan printed that had two bogus towns listed. One was Goblu and the other was Beatosu. It slipped through and got printed up that way. I liked the funny story and stole the name as a convenient screen name that was not likely in use. My son's the big Michigan fan. I'm not a huge sports fan, but still want them to win, of course. Smart people on tracksaw forum spotted it right away :D.

Katie

bhough56
03-06-2012, 11:50 PM
Bruce, no problem. I guess what you just did was to show that the size of the EZ1 can be tailored for specific needs pretty easily. I'd be interested to know how big a job it is/how long it takes for you to trade the 27" SSME for the 50".
Bruce

Bruce,
While assembling my EZ1 and keeping everything square I noticed that when tightening the inner two(closest to the bridge) of the four connectors that hold the 50" SSME in place, that they were a source of pulling things out of (coplaner)square as opposed to using only the two outer connectors. So mainly I use only the outer two connectors closest to the corners of the EZ Ends(keeping the sides coplanerly square). Thus I only have to loosen the two outer connectors(wrench) after loosening the squaring stops(knobs) and removing the SME's. I slide the 50" SSME in place, tighten the nuts(2)(wrench), and slide the squaring stops with SME's attached back in place and tighten(knobs). I don't use the measuring tapes so no alignment of them is necessary and as stated previously, the B300 is attached to separate SME's. Check for square and I'm good to go.
It looks like I made up some new words! If it's not clear what I was saying let me know and I will try to use words that my spell checker recognizes!:D

Time to make saw dust! My specialty!

Randal Stevenson
03-07-2012, 03:39 AM
How are you planning on using the EZ one? I understand space limitations, but if your using it for Ripping, instead of the Ripsizer, I would say look at a YouTube video on the Spartan. Pretty simple to make, and for portable ripping, consider that, while you could use a square (either EZ's or a roofing square, etc), for crosscutting, and clamps for smaller jobsite parts. (more then one way to do things)
I like the EZ one/PBB, etc for home shop use, but prefer to make things light and portable as much for the go to projects.

Goblu
03-18-2012, 11:54 PM
How are you planning on using the EZ one? I understand space limitations, but if your using it for Ripping, instead of the Ripsizer, I would say look at a YouTube video on the Spartan. Pretty simple to make, and for portable ripping, consider that, while you could use a square (either EZ's or a roofing square, etc), for crosscutting, and clamps for smaller jobsite parts. (more then one way to do things)
I like the EZ one/PBB, etc for home shop use, but prefer to make things light and portable as much for the go to projects.

Randal, I originally thought this comment was for BruceM, but maybe for me, so I'll answer it. I'm planning to use it in at least two ways. First, I'm fixing up a big-time fixer-upper house and my list includes a whole lot of things, including installing Pergo flooring, repairing some oak hardwood flooring, reinforcing an old shed so it doesn't collapse (framing, kind-of), trim work, refacing cabinets, etc. I'm not in a huge hurry and do these things as I can afford them.

I'm also loving making cabinets/furniture. I've always done fixer-upper diy stuff, out of necessity mainly. But this new thing, making pieces of furniture (mainly furniture that's based on a box, no chairs, lathework, etc.) is really, really fun. I've made some drawers using dovetail joints, cope-and-stick doors, etc. It's very new, and someday I'll get good at it, I hope.

I know how to square a board using a planer, table saw and jointer and have been using some rough cut lumber and also recycled lumber which may need squaring as well. I'd like to do some of this using the EZ system with a saw and router, though that's a more advanced thing.

The main thing is that I'm not willing to use tools that are excessively dangerous: radial arm saw, table/contractor saw, some router work, etc. I guess I'll still use the miter saw a bit, though I don't have a sliding miter saw, just an old Craftsman compound miter saw, so it is limited in use. Eventually, I hope to figure out how to do these things with the EZ system.

Dino
03-19-2012, 12:00 AM
Eventually, I hope to figure out how to do these things with the EZ system.

G, Is all about positioning the materials.
The rest are ez.
different mindset and total freedom.

tx

d

Randal Stevenson
03-19-2012, 02:01 PM
I know how to square a board using a planer, table saw and jointer and have been using some rough cut lumber and also recycled lumber which may need squaring as well. I'd like to do some of this using the EZ system with a saw and router, though that's a more advanced thing.

The main thing is that I'm not willing to use tools that are excessively dangerous: radial arm saw, table/contractor saw, some router work, etc. I guess I'll still use the miter saw a bit, though I don't have a sliding miter saw, just an old Craftsman compound miter saw, so it is limited in use. Eventually, I hope to figure out how to do these things with the EZ system.

You might want to look up router sleds on YouTube. They can do larger boards then the jointer for face work (one side then through a planer, or both sides if larger then your planer). A 12" CMS should cover you for 90į of what you think you will need out of a SCMS. With the EZ system I don't see a slider being an advantage, until you need large bevel miter combo's (rent on then or maybe the EZ saw will be here).
The SSRK or SRK could make a planer sled, or you could use your ripsizer to make two identical plywood rails and slide along them. Screw some stops in the front of your board on your smart table and hold the boards in place or secure them with the EZ one.
Simply for speed and amount of wood, this is one area where woodworkers either get their wood unprocessed and do it themselves (buying the joiner and planer) or buy it processed locally (then thickness it to their needs). It is a matter of what you have for suppliers. The EZ stuff comes out way ahead for the average homeowner who wants to get into this stuff without the equipment.:)

Goblu
03-23-2012, 01:06 PM
G, Is all about positioning the materials.
The rest are ez.
different mindset and total freedom.

tx

d
Dino, I will work to figure it out as I go!

I appreciate very, very much that you are trying to make woodworking safe for everyone. The easier the better, it will be even safer, since people will start to do the new ez ways.

There is a learning curve with this mindset. For me, I'm new at it, only about a year of using a tablesaw once or twice a week. I don't have to relearn what I already did for years, I don't have to change my mindset as much. But I do have to learn the basics. In that way, I'm far behind.

Maybe someday everyone will learn deadwood philosophy and these tools from the start. That would be great!

Goblu
03-23-2012, 01:22 PM
You might want to look up router sleds on YouTube. They can do larger boards then the jointer for face work (one side then through a planer, or both sides if larger then your planer). A 12" CMS should cover you for 90į of what you think you will need out of a SCMS. With the EZ system I don't see a slider being an advantage, until you need large bevel miter combo's (rent on then or maybe the EZ saw will be here).
The SSRK or SRK could make a planer sled, or you could use your ripsizer to make two identical plywood rails and slide along them. Screw some stops in the front of your board on your smart table and hold the boards in place or secure them with the EZ one.
Simply for speed and amount of wood, this is one area where woodworkers either get their wood unprocessed and do it themselves (buying the joiner and planer) or buy it processed locally (then thickness it to their needs). It is a matter of what you have for suppliers. The EZ stuff comes out way ahead for the average homeowner who wants to get into this stuff without the equipment.:)

Thank you, Randall. I like some of these planer sleds, very cool stuff. I could probably make one, since I don't have a ripsizer or maybe a UEG, but it is on my wishlist for a birthday or Christmas gift. I like the dual ssrk's very much, too, but again a wishlist item for now. The B-300 is the item for the next year, though. So it's all long term planning.

My main question about using a router for planing is how many bits one would have to buy over time, and how expensive the bits are. Also, which bits? I'm assuming carbide-tipped or solid carbide over HSS.

Burt
03-23-2012, 03:16 PM
Thank you, Randall. I like some of these planer sleds, very cool stuff. I could probably make one, since I don't have a ripsizer or maybe a UEG, but it is on my wishlist for a birthday or Christmas gift. I like the dual ssrk's very much, too, but again a wishlist item for now. The B-300 is the item for the next year, though. So it's all long term planning.

My main question about using a router for planing is how many bits one would have to buy over time, and how expensive the bits are. Also, which bits? I'm assuming carbide-tipped or solid carbide over HSS.

Katie,

I do not think using a router as a routine mode of planing is practical. First you need a very sturdy support for the router. Even the metal dual SSRK I showed recently would need aditional support. I would estimate that router bits (about 2" is the largest I know of) would cost somewhere in the $50 for a decent bit. I have never had a router bit sharpened that I was happy with.

New lunch box planers can be found for al little as $200. Blades are about $30 per set and many of these are double sided. Other blades can be sharpened. Sharpening cost is usually a dollar or two per Ince.


Burt

Goblu
03-23-2012, 03:49 PM
Katie,

I do not think using a router as a routine mode of planing is practical. First you need a very sturdy support for the router. Even the metal dual SSRK I showed recently would need aditional support. I would estimate that router bits (about 2" is the largest I know of) would cost somewhere in the $50 for a decent bit. I have never had a router bit sharpened that I was happy with.

New lunch box planers can be found for al little as $200. Blades are about $30 per set and many of these are double sided. Other blades can be sharpened. Sharpening cost is usually a dollar or two per Ince.


Burt

Thank you, Burt! That's very helpful. I currently have limited access to a planer through my community ed classes, not to mention a large bandsaw, some cool sanders, etc. I can do the routing and sawing at home with the EZ tools.

The cost to me of a class series is less than a relatively inexpensive router bit. Plus someone else sharpens the blades :D. If they discontinue the classes I can always look at a lunchbox planer if I have lots of planing to do.