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toollovingschultz
03-05-2012, 09:26 AM
I have a good friend who owns a fesstool ts 75 and has owned his track system for years. I talked to him today he is building cabinets and shelving systems for his wife. He told me about the new table saw he bought with a sliding table a used 3 hp unisaw I believe and how he was ripping some plywood had a kickback and now has a 3/4 inch by 14 inch bruise on his belly. I asked him why he was using the table saw his answer repeatable cuts. It makes you appreciate the tool system dino has developed with a square and repeater we can get repeatable cuts all day. Also with this forum we can get the support on how to build things using the dead wood concept. Our woodworking culture has built the Idea that we need a table saw [big iron] or we aren't really a woodworker. I disagree no more kickbacks for me.
Andy

bumpnstump
03-05-2012, 10:34 AM
I have a good friend who owns a fesstool ts 75 and has owned his track system for years. I talked to him today he is building cabinets and shelving systems for his wife. He told me about the new table saw he bought with a sliding table a used 3 hp unisaw I believe and how he was ripping some plywood had a kickback and now has a 3/4 inch by 14 inch bruise on his belly. I asked him why he was using the table saw his answer repeatable cuts. It makes you appreciate the tool system dino has developed with a square and repeater we can get repeatable cuts all day. Also with this forum we can get the support on how to build things using the dead wood concept. Our woodworking culture has built the Idea that we need a table saw [big iron] or we aren't really a woodworker. I disagree no more kickbacks for me.
Andy

I hear you Andy.
Had a guy call re. the Unisaw I recently sold. In the course of conversation, I let him know that when I went to EZ track saw system, I quit using the table saw- faster, safer, many benefits, etc. 4 times in the conversation, I let him know this. Each time, he immediately ignored my remarks and went back to what he wanted to do with the table saw. hmmm.... ok...... whatever....
I have to admit, tho, old ideas die hard, if they die at all. Truth be known, I'm not sure everyone can/should change their way of thinking, even if it's for their benefit. Thinking outside of our comfort zone is hard work; and, if you don't see the goal/benefit/vision, why bother? It took a specific problem for me to search out track saw systems: ie. it was a solution for a specific problem. But, after seeing how it solved the problem (ie. it's function), my mind engaged and I was able to catch onto the principle of what the system was about. Going from function to principle was the moment of my conversion.
I guess we all approach it differently; I'm just glad that I decided to walk down this path- it's making a big difference in my work, and my mindset towards it; fun has returned.
Rick

Tom Gensmer
03-05-2012, 11:11 AM
As a field carpenter, I didn't use a table saw very much anyways, other than for occasionally ripping face frames and narrow strips for shimming walls. For myself, I really was drawn in by the idea of how much more versatile my circular saw became. Now, instead of just cutting lumber, I could use it (particularly with my EZ-1) to cut tiles, aluminum soffit panels, vinyl siding, threaded rod, etc....., it's just a matter of what blade I use and how I set up my table.

Of course, there is always a place for dedicated machines, but it's nice to know that I have a piece of equipment in my van that can serve as a siding saw, tile saw, panel saw, miter saw, etc.....

Have fun and stay safe out there!
Best,
Tom

Goblu
03-06-2012, 12:48 AM
I'm a new woodworker, taking classes for about a year, and have been a DIYer for a long time. So, I never used a table saw, radial arm saw router/shaper, until recently. Though I fell in love with woodworking and think it's very, very fun, I have been quite hesitant about the danger of these tools. I was looking for safer ways, including building jigs, etc. when I ran across the EZ system online. The concept made perfect sense to me. I'd used a track saw in the class and could see how much safer it was for plywood, though limited.

I'm rennovating a wreck of a house as well as doing woodworking, but I was loathe to take the risks involved. Finding out about this was really a !!!Eureka!!! moment for me. Though I'm on a very limited budget, I've invested in putting together a system and see it as the only way to go if I'm going to do these things.

Perhaps someone new, like me, has an easier time seeing the benefit of these systems than the ones who have used them for years. The downside is that I have to train myself to use them and don't have many of the skills that experienced folk take for granted. Since there is no one to teach these skills using EZ in-person, I am poring over the videos and this forum. It is really great to have this to rely on.

For instance, I just now read a post by Burt on how to be safest with EZ. (Use a right-handed saw and stand on the left side using the right hand to guide the saw, leaving about 7" of a safety zone between me and the saw. Also, the saw if it does bind or anything will go away from me, not toward me. Thanks, Burt :) ). Now that seems simple to nearly everyone reading this, but for me it is really useful information. Thanks everyone who has posted such great information.

I do plan to tell my woodworking teacher once I get something setup and working especially with the router. He may be open to it and perhaps his teaching will get EZier :cool: This could be a real benefit to those teaching, take some of the worry out of it for them.

I'll have more to say once I get everything going. It will take a while, since it's a slow process for me.

Katie

Randal Stevenson
03-06-2012, 01:47 AM
One other item Katie, some saws (my Porter Cable does it, and apparently it is a safety feature on some saws, recent post with a question about nut), let the blade spin loose when pinched (still secured but the motor won't turn it), while the other aspect is if the saw pulls away from you, there is a good chance that your finger will be pulled off the blade.


I expect this may get edited as I have a list of forum questions that will probably tick off someone and get me revoked off this board. (expect it may be my last post)

Burt
03-06-2012, 02:16 AM
One other item Katie, some saws (my Porter Cable does it, and apparently it is a safety feature on some saws, recent post with a question about nut), let the blade spin loose when pinched (still secured but the motor won't turn it), while the other aspect is if the saw pulls away from you, there is a good chance that your finger will be pulled off the blade.


I expect this may get edited as I have a list of forum questions that will probably tick off someone and get me revoked off this board. (expect it may be my last post)

Randal,

That is what the washer on about 90% of the saw is suppose to accomplish. I don't think there is anything different in the "No wrench" saws. (By the way I hate that "no wrench" setup.) It is a royal pain. (Now is that a fact or opinion post?)


Burt

Burt
03-06-2012, 02:27 AM
I'll have more to say once I get everything going. It will take a while, since it's a slow process for me.

Katie


Katie,

Don't rush it and don't be afraid to ask questions. It took me 3 or 4 years to completely convert my cabinet shop from traditional tools EZ Tools. Transition as you are comfortable - at your own pace.

You were talking about things we take for granted or don't think of at all.

Earlier today I read the post Tom did on the Hilti. He was talking about how the safety switch involved with the Hilti worked. I found it very interesting. The Hilti has been my main saw since 2006 and I have 3 of them. Infact I had been using a Hilti only minutes earlier. I've used the saw so much I am on auto pilot when I pick it up.

It is kind of scary to think of the things we do like that.


Burt

Mel Beck
03-06-2012, 03:03 AM
Randal,

That is what the washer on about 90% of the saw is suppose to accomplish. I don't think there is anything different in the "No wrench" saws. (By the way I hate that "no wrench" setup.) It is a royal pain. (Now is that a fact or opinion post?)


Burt

In my opinion and a fact it's why I didn't buy that model or should I say saw. (the "no wrench" setup saw)

Goblu
03-06-2012, 07:31 AM
[QUOTE=Randal Stevenson;21799]One other item Katie, some saws (my Porter Cable does it, and apparently it is a safety feature on some saws, recent post with a question about nut), let the blade spin loose when pinched (still secured but the motor won't turn it), while the other aspect is if the saw pulls away from you, there is a good chance that your finger will be pulled off the blade.
QUOTE]

Thank you, Randall. But I'm unclear on what the bolded portion means. Did you mean to say that your finger will be pulled onto the blade or off the saw or the switch? Perhaps it is just visualizing something I'm not familiar with.

bhough56
03-06-2012, 07:59 PM
Katie,

Don't rush it and don't be afraid to ask questions. It took me 3 or 4 years to completely convert my cabinet shop from traditional tools EZ Tools. Transition as you are comfortable - at your own pace.

You were talking about things we take for granted or don't think of at all.

Earlier today I read the post Tom did on the Hilti. He was talking about how the safety switch involved with the Hilti worked. I found it very interesting. The Hilti has been my main saw since 2006 and I have 3 of them. Infact I had been using a Hilti only minutes earlier. I've used the saw so much I am on auto pilot when I pick it up.

It is kind of scary to think of the things we do like that.


Burt

Burt, Burt, Burt,
Are you trying to get hurt? You should know, never, never go on auto pilot when you get near any powered saw! I've learned from day one, the powered saw is the most dangerous tool we use. Always be wary and expect the unexpected when you put your hand on it! The next one is the router table. I don't care if I type with two or three fingers, I want all ten fingers when I'm doing carpentry!

Signed, Ten Fingers!

Burt
03-06-2012, 09:50 PM
Burt, Burt, Burt,
Are you trying to get hurt? You should know, never, never go on auto pilot when you get near any powered saw! I've learned from day one, the powered saw is the most dangerous tool we use. Always be wary and expect the unexpected when you put your hand on it! The next one is the router table. I don't care if I type with two or three fingers, I want all ten fingers when I'm doing carpentry!

Signed, Ten Fingers!

Ok - Bruce.

I had that coming.


Burt

bhough56
03-06-2012, 10:53 PM
Glad to help! Saw Safe!! And "EZ"

P.S. - The end of my left index finger is actually part of my wrist where they grafted a piece to fill the 1/2" radius divot from jamming my finger into the router table! Ooops! Them machines are so unforgiving and I wasn't even on auto pilot!

Randal Stevenson
03-07-2012, 02:29 AM
[QUOTE=Randal Stevenson;21799]One other item Katie, some saws (my Porter Cable does it, and apparently it is a safety feature on some saws, recent post with a question about nut), let the blade spin loose when pinched (still secured but the motor won't turn it), while the other aspect is if the saw pulls away from you, there is a good chance that your finger will be pulled off the blade.
QUOTE]

Thank you, Randall. But I'm unclear on what the bolded portion means. Did you mean to say that your finger will be pulled onto the blade or off the saw or the switch? Perhaps it is just visualizing something I'm not familiar with.

Should have been switch. Fingers can't keep up with my thought process at times. Other times, due to an old monkey wrenching injury, my finger will hit some hot key I still don't know and paste whatever was in my clipboard.

Vondoom88
03-07-2012, 08:14 AM
I have a good friend who owns a fesstool ts 75 and has owned his track system for years. I talked to him today he is building cabinets and shelving systems for his wife. He told me about the new table saw he bought with a sliding table a used 3 hp unisaw I believe and how he was ripping some plywood had a kickback and now has a 3/4 inch by 14 inch bruise on his belly. I asked him why he was using the table saw his answer repeatable cuts. It makes you appreciate the tool system dino has developed with a square and repeater we can get repeatable cuts all day. Also with this forum we can get the support on how to build things using the dead wood concept. Our woodworking culture has built the Idea that we need a table saw or we aren't really a woodworker. I disagree no more kickbacks for me.
Andy
Had a similar instance with a 1/2 sheet of MDF, haven't used my table saw since. That is what brought me to EZ in the first place. After the kickback incident I always felt like [B]its not if but when , something bad was going to happen. I am willing to take some risks in life but using a clearly unsafe machine isn't one of them. Of course the argument could be made that my motorcycle is a "unsafe machine" but the risk is worth the reward to me in that instance.