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Pintail
12-26-2013, 02:37 AM
Sorry if this is in the wrong place. I'm considering the end of year EZ Shop Special. Have never used a track saw system and am fairly new to wood working. I have done some simple projects and a lot of scroll sawing.

Want to make some bookcases, shelving, and built in cabinets at some point in the next couple of years. So I have some questions.

1. Interested in making custom picture frames. Would I need a router table for that using a fixed base or can the EZ system handle that? What type of learning curve am I looking at in learning to use the system?

2. How do the saw and router in the special measure up to the other ones offered on this site?

3. Other than you tube and the web site and the forum is there any other instructional videos or plans?

bumpnstump
12-26-2013, 03:21 PM
Sorry if this is in the wrong place. I'm considering the end of year EZ Shop Special. Have never used a track saw system and am fairly new to wood working. I have done some simple projects and a lot of scroll sawing.

Want to make some bookcases, shelving, and built in cabinets at some point in the next couple of years. So I have some questions.

1. Interested in making custom picture frames. Would I need a router table for that using a fixed base or can the EZ system handle that? What type of learning curve am I looking at in learning to use the system?

Hi, Pintail, welcome to the forum.
Whichever system you choose (router table or EZ system), will require a learning curve. In common, the two methods require: router placement and control; material feed-control. The router table has a fixed router placement (under the table), so you're left with determining the best material feed-control. The EZ system allows you to fix the router in one place (overhead, ie. above the material) and move the material, as well as fix the material in one place and move the router. If you're not already router savvy, I would recommend becoming familiar with them. If you don't have a router, perhaps you can get together w/someone who does, and have them walk you thru the basics; maybe run some simple edge profiles on scrap wood, etc. Whenever I get a new power tool, the first thing I do (after reading the manual) is plug it in and fire it up- just feeling the torque of the motor is educating in itself.

2. How do the saw and router in the special measure up to the other ones offered on this site?

I can't comment specifically on the ones offered in the special, but there is a difference between routers- mainly in the ergonomics dept. Eg. I have two large plunge routers: a Bosch and a Makita. For me, the Bosch is much easier to set up and use, even tho my Makita is a noticeably finer tool. As a result, I gravitate to the Bosch. If you do end up partnering with a friend who already has some routers, have them show you some of the ergonomic differences. Along with ergonomics, horse power is important, but your friend can help you there. With routers, seems that most of us end up with more than one- it's nice to have designated routers for profiles we use often so you don't have to continually change out router bits. (Lazy decadence, I know........ :rolleyes:)

3. Other than you tube and the web site and the forum is there any other instructional videos or plans?

Not sure what else you might be wanting; youtube, the website, and the forum pretty much cover the bases, excepting, perhaps, being able to get together with someone in person to go over procedures. If you're anywhere near the Texas Hill Country, I can be available. Then, also, you can post to the forum with your specific questions/issues/projects, and the folks here will help.

Hope this helps,
Rick

Pintail
12-26-2013, 08:56 PM
Thanks for the nformation Rick. Some of my concerns are what some of the nay sayers are saying. Especially about dust control. Planning on getting the best vac I can afford and connecting to the dust ports on the tools.

The learning curve wasn't so much about the router as it was learning all the different ways you can set the ez system up and doing it in an efficient manner which isn't such a pita it gets stuffed in the attic and my wife keeps telling me how I wasted a lot of money.

Also I am near the hill country (sort of) Leander which is near 1431 and Palmer.
Would you mind sharing your experience with the EZ system and what if anything you would do different?

Thanks again for all the good info.
Arthur

bumpnstump
12-26-2013, 10:49 PM
Thanks for the nformation Rick. Some of my concerns are what some of the nay sayers are saying. Especially about dust control. Planning on getting the best vac I can afford and connecting to the dust ports on the tools.

The learning curve wasn't so much about the router as it was learning all the different ways you can set the ez system up and doing it in an efficient manner which isn't such a pita it gets stuffed in the attic and my wife keeps telling me how I wasted a lot of money.

Also I am near the hill country (sort of) Leander which is near 1431 and Palmer.
Would you mind sharing your experience with the EZ system and what if anything you would do different?

Thanks again for all the good info.
Arthur

Wow, go figure! In Leander! After 40+ years in Austin, we just moved to Kerrville a bit over a year and a half ago. I used to motorcycle out 1431 (other side of 183 from you; sounds like you're not too far from BMC Lumber door mill- I know it well.......): @ Volente, take Lime Creek road till it hits 1431; go left, thru Jonestown and Lago Vista; on into Marble Falls; breakfast at the Bluebonnet Cafe (pie for breakfast, anyone?); return route down 281 to 71. It's so built up out there now, that the 'fun-factor' is almost gone. The explosive growth in the Austin area is one of the main reasons we moved.
Since I'm only down the road from you in Kerrville, perhaps the next time you take the missus to Fredericksburg, you can pop down my way and visit?

Re. EZ stuff: I came from many years of using a table saw; had a need on a job for something like a track saw; did a bit of research of the different brands; chose EZ; did the job; put the track in the corner, forgot about it, and went on with life as usual.
Fast forward some months later; dug the track out and began to think about where I could use it in my work; the 'light came on' as I began to see some of it's possibilities, and I started putting it to work; soon ordered one of the EZ-one work benches w/an SSRK (router kit); also made my own PBB (power bench) with some features the EZ-One didn't offer; in short order, my Delta Unisaw table saw was not being used at all; sold it a year later, after having had it for many, many years- I do not miss it at all; a few years on and I'm still discovering procedures/projects that I couldn't/wouldn't do w/a table saw.

Dust collection w/EZ is something that most guys work at improving. Some of the other tracksaw systems have better 'off-the-shelf' dust collection ability, but w/a bit of work, you can get your dust under control. A quick search on this forum should give you some ideas about what others have done.

Don't know that there's anything I would do differently. I think, in my woodworking journey, moving over to the tracksaw , at the time I did, was right for me. I'd been thinking about moving up to one of the Euro combo saws, but, thankfully, didn't. I like the versatility of the EZ system; the rigidity of the track extrusions lets you do things you couldn't with some of the other tracksaw systems; and the open design of the track allows you, with a bit of creative thinking, to use all 4 sides (something I've done for a few novel projects). Plus, the better safety factor (than a table saw) is great.
But, like anything else, it takes the inner discipline to get the equipment out; go thru the motions of using it; clean up the mess; put it all away. If you're willing to do that, you shouldn't have any problems.

Let me know when you're ready for a visit- any time is fine. :)
Rick

Pintail
12-27-2013, 03:02 AM
If my wife weren't in love with Austin would have a few acres out in the hinterlands. You're right about that route probably not so much fun for a Sunday bike cruise. Southern Basteop county out on 535 and in that area still rural.

Careful,what you wish for, been dying to find an excuse to take my new truck out on the road. Think I'm going o pull the trigger on the EZ system and get a Festool Vac for dust control. Have to check out the bags though. If they really cost 75 apiece will need to rethink that.

Festool is just to expensive and my research, hope it's on track, says that this system is more versitable than the others and a lot easier on the wallet. Somehow I just can't quite drink that green kool-aid.

While it all looks good and simple my pockets are deep enough to became an addict. Hope that makes since to you,

bumpnstump
12-27-2013, 09:27 AM
If my wife weren't in love with Austin would have a few acres out in the hinterlands. You're right about that route probably not so much fun for a Sunday bike cruise. Southern Basteop county out on 535 and in that area still rural.

Careful,what you wish for, been dying to find an excuse to take my new truck out on the road. Think I'm going o pull the trigger on the EZ system and get a Festool Vac for dust control. Have to check out the bags though. If they really cost 75 apiece will need to rethink that.

Festool is just to expensive and my research, hope it's on track, says that this system is more versitable than the others and a lot easier on the wallet. Somehow I just can't quite drink that green kool-aid.

While it all looks good and simple my pockets are deep enough to became an addict. Hope that makes since to you,

Re. vacs, consider one of these: http://www.industrialvacs.com/Attix_50_AS_E_XC_Super_Quiet_Wet_Dry_Vacuum_p/302004235.htm
Get a prefilter/liner, and you don't have to worry about the vac bags. Or, consider the new Makita VC 4710 for less $. Also, I believe Nilfisk makes the Festool vac.
Some think this is the king of the hill: http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=3931A-PB
At this price range, I think they'll all do the job adequately.

Should you decide you want to make the drive to Kerrville, contact me on my personal account. It's a yahoo account, bumpnstump at y....etc.
Rick

eddiecalder
12-27-2013, 10:59 AM
I just picked up a Fein Turbo 2 vacuum for $225 shipped off of Ebay.

bumpnstump
12-27-2013, 11:43 AM
I just picked up a Fein Turbo 2 vacuum for $225 shipped off of Ebay.

eddie, sounds like you got some great Christmas tool-money? I was lucky to get the proverbial lump of coal........ :rolleyes:
Good catch on the vac.
Rick

Burt
12-27-2013, 05:39 PM
The only thing I see missing is some kind of multiform table. The easiest solution is the multiform table plastic kit. That will allow you to use the EZ One as a Multi-form table.

As for the quality of the tools, that could be debated. Some of the fellows on the forum are using the Hitachi saw and prefer it over the Makita.

I've owned a couple of the Hitachi routers and have found them not to be quiet as good as the Bosch 1617. The main difference was the Hitachi had a bit more vibration.


Burt

eddiecalder
12-27-2013, 08:39 PM
eddie, sounds like you got some great Christmas tool-money? I was lucky to get the proverbial lump of coal........ :rolleyes:
Good catch on the vac.
Rick

I'm happy with the purchase but the wife is not.

Pintail
12-30-2013, 09:56 PM
Pulled the trigger tonight. Got the shop package on sale. Hope this is good and works as well as everyone says it does. Got to admit a bit worried about it.

bumpnstump
12-30-2013, 11:21 PM
Pulled the trigger tonight. Got the shop package on sale. Hope this is good and works as well as everyone says it does. Got to admit a bit worried about it.

Well, if you hit any snags, we're here to help.
Rick

Tmyoung
12-31-2013, 04:49 PM
Hi Pintail,

I hope you love the tools. They truly do work great. But please remember as with anything new there is a learning curve. It still takes time and skill to build to exacting spec with wood. The tools are not a short cut. But an aid to help your creativity come to life. These tools do and will allow you build to the highest standards. I was so eager when I got all mine. Ripped it all open and started cutting away. Never taking the time to get to know all the ends and outs. Often going back to my table saw because I am so familiar with it. I have since taken the time to build a fence and use a story stick in my building process with the EZ tools. Not only is my building process a little faster. It is much safer and the results are top of the line.

Pardon the rambling post. I just worked all day with the EZ tools. And I can't believe how happy with the results I am. I am so pleased that I stuck with them. And hope you will be also.

Cheers, Tom

Goblu
12-31-2013, 09:54 PM
I got my EZ stuff when I was pretty new to woodworking. I'd bought a used contractor's saw, radial arm saw, router table with router, each for $50 or less. Never used them once I saw the EZ system. it is a bigger learning curve if you are still learning how to do woodworking, but on the other hand there is less to unlearn. I think of it as thinking how to do things backwards (upside down, really) from the way you'd do it on a table saw or router table. Luckily, I'm not in a hurry to do any of these things, and taking time to figure it out means I understand the principles behind the system better, too. Speeds up the next attempt.

For me, the big thing is the safety of the system, but also there is some amazing flexibility in doing things that cannot be easily done on a table saw.

The members of this forum have been wonderful/patient in helping newbies like me figure out how to do things. Even when my explanations have been obscure (I don't know what I'm doing enough to explain it clearly). Pictures of what you are trying to do often help.

The creativity of many of these folks are inspiring! Reading through the forum is a great help, too.

Pintail
01-01-2014, 04:09 AM
I thank everyone for there support and advice. Now the "long wait" to get the tools so I can start to famaralize myself with them. Just bought a house today with two niches on either side of the fireplace. My goal is to start building some built in cabinets for those spots within the next year or so.

Going to start with some bookcases for the kid's books and some shelving for his toys. If I can get my printer to stop eating paper and print something have a scroll saw project I want to start on tomorrow.

Again thanks for all the support and good advice.

kenk
01-03-2014, 09:06 PM
Pintail,

A fair number of years back I had purchased the very same EZ-ready saw that you have ordered ... and it is a GREAT saw. No concerns at all on my part.

The fact that Dino and his gang pre-assembled the base, so all you need to do is connect the rails (if using two of them), pre-trim the white anti-chip edge (on a scrap ... wear eye protection as the plastic can fly a bit), then clamp lightly on to your target wood and cut away. It is very VERY easy and ohhhh so accurate.

For a cutting base, I use the SmartTable, but for a long time I just used saw horses with a few sacrificial 2x4's. Others suggest using a layer of foam insulation, though I'd think that would get messy.

You won't regret it AT ALL!!

Pintail
01-04-2014, 12:11 AM
Everything soulf be here on the 8th. Looking forward to it. Any suggestions on router bits? Brand and type to get started with?

bumpnstump
01-04-2014, 01:20 AM
Everything soulf be here on the 8th. Looking forward to it. Any suggestions on router bits? Brand and type to get started with?

Arthur, names like Whiteside, Amana, CMT are good brands. In your area, you can get the Whitesides at Fine Lumber and Plywood (off Dungan Lane; superb place to get wood; awesome people), or, if you're in S. Austin, at Weatherfords, near where St. Elmo an Industrial Blvd. converge; Woodcraft (on Hwy. 183)carries the CMT, Whiteside, and Woodcraft brand; Amana can be had from these folks: http://www.toolstoday.com/c-206-router-bits.aspx (good outfit to do business with). I think Brannen's, over on Buell, carries Bosch.
HTH,
Rick

Goblu
01-04-2014, 03:33 PM
Cheaper router bits are useful if it is a specialty bit you are not sure you will use it often. But good ones last a lot longer if it's a bit that is likely to be used for a long time/frequently. Like making a bunch of cabinet doors. Straight bits of various kinds, some edging bits like roundover and cove bits fall into that category for me. Even good brands of straight bits are cheapest and used a lot.

Often Whiteside is not much less money than cheaper router bits and is top-rated. I get mine from Hartville tool, since they have free shipping regardless of the size of the order. They have a 10% holiday discount until the 6th. I don't see many discounts through them, so I got a few bits I predicted I'd need. But mainly with the free shipping I can get a bit when I need it that way. I don't have any good woodworking stores close by. And the gas for a 40 minute drive makes it costly. http://www.hartvilletool.com/category/whiteside

Getting a starter set is ok, but often there are bits in it you won't use. Here's the set I got from Woodcraft their brand Woodriver. I got it on sale for $39 so a good value. http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004091/29236/WoodRiver-10-Piece-Router-Router-Bit-Set-14-Shank.aspx I wouldn't pay much more than that, though. I don't know if the 1/2" shank set goes on sale, but the one reviewer says he likes the set except one of them broke :eek:. So, that might be a better choice. It's also a warning not to push the bits too hard (especially 1/4" shank bits should not be pushed too hard). 1/2" shanks are generally better. More stable, etc. except for trim routing or the router I love to use, the Dewalt 611 with the plunge base which only uses 1/4" shanks.

Rockler sometimes has Freud bits at heavy discounts, but the shipping is a factor. If you are going to spend more than $25 it's often free if you sign up for their email. I do like the Freud quadra-cut bits, they are good for edging and I've had horrible profile-destroying sanding with cheap/dull bits on cherry. From my woodworking class when first learning--I learned that. Very worth it if you are using hardwood that tends to burn.

I like CMT and Woodcraft used to have some good deals on that brand and got a few then. Never used amana.

I'm considering using mill ends instead of spiral upcut bits. They are a better value.

I love spiral upcut bits (I have a 5mm from Whiteside and it is great). But they are usually pricey. I'm looking at getting a 1/4" mill end to use for cabinet shelf pins. Eventually I'll get a 1/2" size. I wonder if anyone has used them and what brand. With the mill ends you have to pay attention to the shaft size, because the shaft is generally the same diameter of the cutting portion. If anyone has used these, I wonder what brand you favor. There was a good post on the green brand forum about using mill end bits. If I find it again, I'll post it.

Goblu
01-04-2014, 04:20 PM
I'm not recommending the MLCS Katana router bits because I've never used them, but someone who does this for a living said they were worth a look. I like their site, because it usually shows clearly what the resulting cut of each profile is. As a new woodworker, it took a while to figure this out, especially with things like panels in cabinet doors. Plus they often have instructions for their bits. They have a great site for information in general. Here's an example of their discussion of straight router bits:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/katana_bits4.htm

I might buy one of the Katana bits if I needed it and it was cost effective, though. Perhaps others know about this brand. Katana is their premium brand. The guy who recommended these said buy the Katana over their standard bits.

They also have free shipping.

Anyone, feel free to chime in if you have used the Katana router bits and do or don't like them.

Pintail
01-04-2014, 11:54 PM
Found a great site called "woodworking for mere mortals" would post a link but currently only have an I Pad as my other computer has issues. Anyway, from all the good advice here and from my research it seems to buy what you need for a project and hopefully they will be useful in other projects.

A couple of things I really want to make are some simple picture frames for posters my son got for Christmas and some a redwood doormat forthehpise. I also have some ideas for a couple of bookcases I want to make. I figure with this in mind will need a round over and something to cut dadoes.

Another tool I'm considering is the Ridgid belt spindle sandsr at HD and am wondering if a belt/disc sander wouldn't be more useful at the present time. Planning on doing boxes on the scrollsaw and a spindle sander is great for that. Application.

The biggest issue is ai only have 1/2 of a two car garage to set up shop in so really need to get creative on tool setup. This is going to be so much fun and I thank all of you for your good advice.

philb
01-05-2014, 04:17 AM
Pintail: I gotta warn you! You sound like you are half a step away from needing a 12 Step Program! I recognize the symptoms because I have been in need of treatment for some time now! Repent before it is too late! If that is not an option, I would buy a variable speed orbital hook and loop sander. The spindle sander is useful for the scroll saw work so buy that too. Park the car in the rain (the wife can wax it so it will not get too damaged. Move the washer and dryer to the patio, then build an awning or carport over the drive for extra maneuvering room (park the car in the street). Buy and extra heavy extension cord that will reach to the curb for those extended projects. Sell the car and buy more wood (you can take a bus and the wife can walk -- just buy her a headband and water bottle so the neighbors won't ask questions). Actually every room needs a bookcase. Build the kid a hobby horse (since he doesn't need to actually go anywhere). Boxes! Women love boxes -- seriously! -- at farmers market the women go nuts over boxes, big, little, fancy and utilitarian, it does not matter. You will avoid high alimony payments if you are always making her something and boxes are a hit.

Just be sure to seek help if you get interested in a lathe ( I had 3 until about 4 months ago). I got a new lathe in Dec. 2012 and I make about 3 to 4 bowls or other projects a week. Which is only exceeded by the number of projects coming off my Epilog Helix 24 laser, that I got last May -- I had to remodel and rewire the room -- it is my new bedroom (without the bed).

Now do you understand why I advise you to seek help? You do not want to end up like me do you?? If that is where you are headed anyway, I have an Excalibur 21 scroll saw and I am always here to share ideas.

Glenn
01-05-2014, 01:42 PM
pintail, I also have half a double garage for my shop. I divided the garage in half with 3/4 inch white melamine board and then every single thing that touches the floor is on casters. I can move anything/everything in and out etc. With the EZ tools it works well even on 4x8 sheets. ( I also rearrange the shop periodically. )

Ivanhoe
01-05-2014, 06:43 PM
I have several Katana bits and they perform great. But, I am only a hobbiest so my use is fairly light.

TooManyToys
01-05-2014, 07:36 PM
..... it seems to buy what you need for a project and hopefully they will be useful in other projects. ..........

And therefore my "TooManyToys" handle.

kenk
01-05-2014, 08:35 PM
The best advice I've read about beginning with router bits is to stick with 1/2" shaft bits, and to buy a lower-cost bit set to start with ... and then replace those that you actually use - or use the most - with higher quality bits.

I started with an MLCS 15-bit set.

For routing, I have both a Bosch benchtop router table (RA1181) for my Bosch 1617EVSPK router and recently purchased the EZ Super Smart Routing Kit. I bought an extra under table router base (Bosch RA1165 - really just a fixed base without the wood handle knobs) for use with the table and an extra plunge router base (RA1166) for the SSRK. Not trying to push Bosch gear here ... just telling you how I set myself up.

On a very different note ... to rip boards - for picture frames - you'd probably want to buy the EZ Smart Clamp System (current price is $90 ... I think that is for two smart clamps) - which will allow you to connect to narrow boards.

Truth be told, I had purchased the upgrade ($30x2=$60), but later decided that I wanted both regular clamps for simplicity, and the Smart clamps for ripping narrow boards ... so I bought two additional regular clamps ($25x2=$50) and upgraded those instead. The total cost is $110 ... of course it would be cheaper to buy the set of two Smart Clamp System for $90.

I have to say, Eurekazone's on-line product manuals (pdf's) have been improved in a MAJOR way in the last year or so. They are very nice now. Thank you Eurekazone!!

Derrell
01-06-2014, 01:18 AM
The Ridgid osc. spindle & belt sander is a great tool. Once you get one you'll use it for all sorts of things. As for working out of 1/2 of the garage, one thing that has worked well for me was to build a bench against the wall tall enough for tools to fit under it while not is use. For example I have my jointer, planer, & router table on wheels. When not is use they go under the bench and I haven't lost any bench space.

Pintail
01-06-2014, 02:29 AM
Kind of tired tonight. Planning on building rolling cabinets for tools and may put in a long work bench along one wall. At least his garage has an expansion joint in the middle which makes it a bit easier to divide.

The two most expensive items I have bought in my life was my first set of golf clubs and an Excaliber 21 scrollsaw. Not sure but I think up to now the golf clubs were more expensive but the scrollsaw is catching up.

I can't get addicted to something cheap like heroin or meth oh no not me. It has to be golf and woodworking two of the most expensive hobbies there is. The worst part is the new house has an usable attic. A fairly large usable attic. It can hold a lot of stuff leaving even more room for expensive stuff.

Crossing my fingers That a lathe doesn't show up sometime this year.

Thanks for all the food advice.

Goblu
01-06-2014, 07:45 PM
I can't get addicted to something cheap like heroin or meth oh no not me. It has to be golf and woodworking two of the most expensive hobbies there is. So now you tell me? Once I'm already committed;) At least I don't play golf. I garden, and even though there was a book about the $10 tomato with home gardening, at least I get some fresh food.

To create more room in shops, I recently saw something where that Ridgid sander was mounted on a piece of plywood, as were some other tools. The guy had built a cabinet to house all of the tools with the attached plywood as slide in shelves. He had two different height worktable that he built and he attached the tool he needed to the top. It's a very cool concept for a small shop that looks quick and fairly easy to make. I'm strongly considering it.

If I do I'll start with the tall unit and the tools can be clamped to sawhorse stands. The EB4424 that he mentions is the Ridgid sander.

Here's his description I made rolling stands one 24" one 36" and a storage cabinet. All my portable machines are on the same size chunk of plywood and both stands have a cutout frame to hold all the tools, there are screws with wooden hold downs on each side to secure the tools. The little drill press has been replaced by a floor model and my EB4424 now resides in that spot.


pictures from this forum: https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/t19201/

TooManyToys
01-06-2014, 09:22 PM
Well Katie, since you need something for that new Dewalt planer .....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgGmebcgvM8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgGmebcgvM8)

Burt
01-06-2014, 09:42 PM
You can use either the MFT or EZ One and a couple smart clamps to hold the tools in place.

Goblu
01-06-2014, 10:46 PM
Well Katie, since you need something for that new Dewalt planer .....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgGmebcgvM8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgGmebcgvM8)

Wow, that really is quality. I like the thought he put into it, the emphasis on repeatability, etc. I've seen those flip stands before, but never that nice. If I were using a miter saw, I'd be tempted by his rig.

I don't like the idea of flipping my brand new planer upside down, though. :eek: I won't get it set up till summer likely, but still, I'll try it right side up for a while, before I do any flipping. :D

Only one problem with that video. He mentions that it's winter and he's wearing a hooded sweatshirt in his garage!!! Well, come to Michigan and won't be in the garage in winter. At least not this winter. If you go outside and dare to smile, your teeth will crack right now.

Goblu
01-06-2014, 10:55 PM
You can use either the MFT or EZ One and a couple smart clamps to hold the tools in place.Sounds like the EZ solution to me. :cool: Even less stuff needed. Minimalist. I like it.

I do like that tall storage unit, and mounting various things on plywood. Even something like my pocket hole jig could be stored there, which mounts nicely in the ez one. It would all be readily available.

I've got some horrible bug right now, so it's a good time to make some plans in my head for later. Plus have chicken soup.

Pintail
01-07-2014, 02:16 AM
Hope you get feeling better soon Katie. My biggest problem isn't so much space right now as it is what else to get to put in that space.

Shop vac Vs. dust collector.

Disc sander and the Ridgid spindle/belt sander or disc /belt sander and using the drill press for spindle type sanding? Or just the Ridgid?

Air compressor 33 Gal oiless at HD for 300 or 30 gal oil for 439? Tho since it will mostly be used for nailing Lowes has the bostich pancake with three nailers for under 300. Really leaning toward the Bostich and if I want to do paint and stain with a sprayer maybe electric? Does anyone make a good HVLP (hope that's right) electric paint/stain sprayer?

Don't have 220 available so it does narrow my choices.

Anyway tomorrow I'm moving the Excaliber scrollsaw which is what started this not to long ago.

philb
01-07-2014, 02:58 AM
I have an Apollo 1050VR HVLP paint system. The Apollo and Fuji are considered the best, but that again is all relative to the task, budget, and amount of use. I think Dik has the Earlex (I may be wrong about that) but finishing is another subject all to itself. Getting the best system will not make your work good, the system will give you tools to do a standard job better, or a difficult task easier. I use some special tools because I have little use of my left arm. the HVLP allows me to spray into corners and tight areas with ease. I hate painting corners. However that is not a great reason to spend $1500 for a paint system. My son's sign company has a ton of finishing and we use it for sign finishes. Also for finishing those darn inside corners.

Dik Harrison
01-07-2014, 06:06 AM
I have the Fuji and love it. I started with the Rockler $99 deal and it was okay until the turbine died. Got another from the warranty, but had already decided to get the Fuji. The second Rockler is still in the box. Guess I should get rid of it as I don't think I'll ever use it.

Goblu
01-07-2014, 10:59 AM
Some people have favorably compared the rockler system to the Harbor Freight one shown here.
http://www.harborfreight.com/20-oz-high-volume-low-pressure-gravity-feed-spray-gun-69705.html

With a 25% off coupon, it is under $25. It would be a good way to experiment before investing more money. Building a spray booth is also part of it. Something I haven't done but may.

For most of my cabinets so far I've used natural Watco Danish oil finish (over cherry). Couldn't be easier, just rub in with a cloth. Most important, first I spend a lot of time sanding properly and making sure the surface is dust free. I like the look as well as the ease, though they are not heavy use items. When I do the kitchen, I'll likely use the spray system, but that is quite a ways in the future. I do plan to try the HF spray gun on smaller projects first. I doubt that I will buy a more expensive system, though.

TooManyToys
01-07-2014, 12:46 PM
12cfm @45psi takes a good compressor behind it.

Pintail
01-07-2014, 11:03 PM
Actually was asking about an ELECTRIC spray gun because otherwise can get by with a compact pancake compressor.

philb
01-08-2014, 03:35 AM
Pintail:
An HVLP is the way to go. Electric will drive you nuts with low quality work and the noise (not volume,it is the type of noise). Most HVLP come with a turbine included The Apollo and Fuji are very similar and they both have 4 turbines and some five turbine units. The turbines force the air, High Volume at Low Pressure.

Having had electric (Wagner) and compressor style (with tank), and HVLP 4 Turbine 1050VR. I will say there is no real adequate comparison with the HVLP to the other units. You will love one and only accept the others as a bad compromise.

HTH

Ivanhoe
01-08-2014, 01:22 PM
The above HVLP are great recommendations if they are in your $$ range. If not, and you go with one of the compressors you mentioned, you can go LVLP. I currently run my 30gal Craftsman oil-less compressor with one of Jeff Jewitt's spray guns and it works fine. http://www.homesteadfinishingproducts.com/

Jeff and his books/dvds have really been a big help to a novice such as myself and with his guidance I have painted several projects using high quality latex paint. (Sherwin Williams Pro Classic on top of Zinnser Bin Shellac based primer) And they blow away any brush applied jobs I did in the past.

Good luck

Rod

TooManyToys
01-08-2014, 03:44 PM
Agree with your choice. He has guns that can work with the 6-8 cfm compressors that many actually have in their shop.

Pintail
01-09-2014, 11:43 PM
Well finally got time to start putting my EZ woodworking center together today and either none of the fences have kerfs on them or I'm just missing something.

Going to call tech support tomorrow and hopefully will be able to cut some wood this weekend. Think I have an old pocket knife somewhere.

Derrell
01-10-2014, 02:22 AM
The fences won't have a kerf until you cut one in them. That's the way the system is currently designed. I suppose the thought is once you get your fences/cross rails in position you will usually always leave them in place. If not them you end up with multiple kerfs in them - which there is really nothing wrong with.

Pintail
01-10-2014, 10:55 AM
Okay. Will call tech support and ask,about it.

Pintail
01-10-2014, 11:13 AM
Though I have to,add if I try to cut metal with a wood blade nothing good will happen. Either I missed something or am missing something.

whitejacket
01-10-2014, 01:07 PM
Aluminum can be easily cut with the same blade you use for wood.

Joe

Goblu
01-10-2014, 01:08 PM
A few thoughts based on my experience. If you square up your table and then do the cut(s) you can then use the cut line to reposition the bridge when you move it. Since you move the bridge for various reasons (like using it with the router) this is quite handy.

Alternatively, you can put a piece of sacrificial plywood on the top in order not to cut through the extrusions.

I wouldn't use a fine high quality wood blade to do this, but instead a cheaper combo blade (24t). It's just a small cut.

The main thing is to avoid cutting too deep. For this, there is the UHMW (black plastic) block that you affix to the rail next to the bridge. This helps you not cut too deep, because you will cut that first (and see a bunch of black plastic bits) and stop before the rail. It's purpose is to help you set the depth of cut. But if you make a mistake, it's cheap to replace.

I'd never cut thru metal parts like this before so I was hesitant. But it really works ok to do this.

Anytime you cut metal it's very important to wear safety equipment, glasses, etc.

Pintail
01-16-2014, 09:27 PM
Well so far done just about everything wrong I could do. On the other hand I think this is a great system for those who are not spatially challenged. I know I've cut to deep into my fences and hope they won't break for a while.

Can't figure out why when I put my UEG together the two nuts and lock washers won't tighten enough to hold the extrusions (rails) at a 90 degree angle. It's a bit of a pia when you need one hand to hold the saw another hand to hold the handle and another hand to get everything square. Anyone got an extra hand or two they aren't using.

There has to be a better way to break down a full sheet of plywood than taking the rail off the bridge making your rip cuts then putting it back on to make the cross cuts.

Using an iPad to watch the videos is less than enlightening. I can't hear very well and it's hard for this old f##t to see much detail. Well as they say don't blame the equipment when the operator ain't operating the equipment as the equipment is designed to be operated.

I will get all this worked out just needed to vent a little.

TooManyToys
01-17-2014, 12:47 AM
Setup the new base locked onto the rails as it would normally be in use, then you can assemble the fence and handle.

Johnson652
04-10-2016, 03:49 AM
If my wife weren't in love with Austin would have a few acres out in the hinterlands. You're right about that route probably not so much fun for a Sunday bike cruise. Southern Basteop county out on 535 and in that area still rural.

Careful,what you wish for, been dying to find an excuse to take my new truck out on the road. Think I'm going o pull the trigger on the EZ system and get a Festool Vac for dust control. Have to check out the bags though. If they really cost 75 apiece will need to rethink that.

Festool is just to expensive and my research, hope it's on track, says that this system is more versitable than the others and a lot easier on the wallet. Somehow I just can't quite drink that green kool-aid.

While it all looks good and simple my pockets are deep enough to became an addict. Hope that makes since to you,:confused::confused: