PDA

View Full Version : How to make face frame stock with a track saw


CarlB
06-02-2010, 12:02 AM
Hello all; I've been lurking here for a while and decided to finally post some of my questions. :) I am relatively new to woodworking and am looking for a way to cut wood for cabinet-style projects (bookshelves, dressers, etc.). I really like the idea of a track saw, especially since I have very little room in my "shop" (a one-car garage that my wife wants to park her car in someday, once we clear out all the boxes of junk...). I don't think I can afford a PBB (and not sure I have the space for one, anyway). I've purchased an STK and am wanting to (eventually) get a track saw to go with it.

I'm trying to think how I would use a track saw for various tasks I would need to do in order to make my projects. Some things are obvious, but others, not as much. Like, for example, how can I cut stock to make face frames, all a consistent width? Say, for example, I want to make 2" wide stock, and I have some boards that are of varying widths, from 2 1/4" to 2 3/4". It seems like the cabinetmaker system is a good way to do repetitive cuts. From what I've seen, "normal" use of the repeaters has the stops on the right side of the track. But I don't think that will work in this case, particularly in the case of the hypothetical 2 1/4" stock (not enough stock to clamp, unless I upgrade to super-smart clamps). So, I thought, just put the stops 2" to the left of the cut line, and there you go. But this places the stops under the track. Is this possible? Any other suggestions as to how to accomplish this with a track saw?

When using two repeaters (I think I'd need two for such narrow stock -- right?), how does one ensure that both repeaters are exactly the same distance from the cut line?

I have more questions, but I'll start with these. :)

Thanks!

Carl

Dino
06-02-2010, 12:36 AM
Carl, welcome to the forum.
Look at the site for pictures of the smart clamps and clamping systems.
Many ways to set a stop block 2" from the cutting line and keep cutting.
No repeaters or cabinetmakers for this simple task.

Make two small holes and two small nails to act like a stop?;)

why didnt think of that before:confused::o

CarlB
06-02-2010, 03:37 AM
Hi Dino; thanks for the reply (and the welcome :)). I had assumed I would need the cabinetmaker with at least one repeater for cutting the plywood parts to size, and was thinking that I could somehow re-use it for the face frames. When you say "two small holes and two small nails", do you mean nailed into the bottom of the track? If so, what do you think about tapping holes on the bottom for small bolts, using some sort of jig to ensure they were the same distance from the edge of the track? I could tap a set of holes (2 or 3?) so that there were stops of varying distances from the cut line, then make several of these sets along the track for different lengths of stock. I could insert the bolts as needed, cut off their heads and even screw on different size nuts for finer adjustments. Maybe I'm taking this idea too far (I'm not even sure there is enough space on the bottom of the track for this type of modification), but I'm having fun brainstorming after reading your post. :cool:

Carl

Jeff Freelove
06-02-2010, 05:14 PM
Carl,

Welcome to EZ and lots of techniques to achieve your goals.

You are correct: you could indeed measure and drill two 1/64" holes (in the SGS) from the cut edge of your EAC. Then insert nails to stop the rail or style from moving past that 2" point.
Here's 2 other ideas to get you the same results:
1. In lieu of nails, use wide double sided carpet tape and attach a scrap to the bottom of the SGS for the 2" offset.
2. If you have 4 Smart clamps, you can clamp a scrap for your 2" offset and clamp the stock to be cut with the others. This method will make your SGS fully supported on the "4 legs of the Smart clamps.

Here's one last technique to consider. I stole it from Burt. Instead of ripping all of the stiles and then routing the ends, rout the end profile and then rip to width. This will reduce the normal tear out on the ends.

Cabinets are Burt's business and he has developed some awesome techniques and time savers with Eurekazone products.

Take care,

Jeff Freelove

Joseph N. Myers
06-02-2010, 08:55 PM
Carl,

Just to follow-up on Jeff's response about using the Smart Clamps!

I used the extra clamps to cut the wood to width and then put an angle cut on them to build some of those storage boxes. And because the four clamps acted as its own table, didn't need any other table, i.e., Smart Table.

Regards, Joe

Dino
06-02-2010, 09:59 PM
Carl,

Just to follow-up on Jeff's response about using the Smart Clamps!

I used the extra clamps to cut the wood to width and then put an angle cut on them to build some of those storage boxes. And because the four clamps acted as its own table, didn't need any other table, i.e., Smart Table.

Regards, Joe

Hi Joe.
Nice work and you make it look easy.
I try to call you but...
can you give me a call?

thanks
732-259-9984

Burt
06-02-2010, 11:00 PM
Carl,

Welcome to the EZ forum! I would have responded to your post earlier but when you're talking with Dino - you've got the master.

Joe - I always enjoy your posts on stuff like this. You were using EZ equipment when about all there was, was the rail and clamps. You seem to know all of those little tricks that really make EZ - EZ.

Carl an idea on how to rip the face frame stock. Put a straight edge on a piece of stock and clamp it to your rail so the space left under the rail is 2" or whatever size you need. Then slide a piece of straightlined stock under the rail and make your cut.

Burt

CarlB
06-03-2010, 01:12 AM
Thanks for all of the tips! I really like the idea of the extra smart clamps; that way I can use a straightedge (as Burt suggested) for things like face frames, but also have the ability to use the clamps with other jigs (as Joe's pictures clearly show; very cool stuff). It looks like a very versatile solution.

Carl

Jeff Freelove
06-03-2010, 03:48 AM
Carl,
Burt is a professional cabinetmaker and has shared lots of photos. His write ups are straight to the point. If you have the time, reviewing his photos and comments can be informative and a huge time saver.

Now, if I could just apprentice in his shop for 6 weeks....Promise I won't steal (too many) ideas.;) Only the EZ ones.

Take care,
Jeff Freelove
It's rained all week in Garmisch. The Alps are beautiful even in the fog.:D

staceyw
06-03-2010, 04:10 AM
Could be wrong. But I think dino was talking about putting nails in the table 2" (plus kerf) on right side of track on bridge. Slide your stock under bridge against nails as a stop. Right side of rail is keeper piece. He has a video of same using a flip stop. I don't think he wanted you to drill into your rail as that would not be so ez. But been wrong before.

Joseph N. Myers
06-03-2010, 12:50 PM
Talking about the EZ Clamps......

I was looking through some of my old posts and came across one that deals with "clamping long narrow parts" that I think you might find interesting. Check it out at (post 5):

http://tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=53&highlight=Joseph

Bottom line is that the EZ Clamps can be used in numerous situations --- I'll try to find some of my other posts on some of my uses especially ones dealing with the PBB (power bench/bridge).

HTH, Joe

CarlB
06-04-2010, 01:53 AM
Could be wrong. But I think dino was talking about putting nails in the table 2" (plus kerf) on right side of track on bridge. Slide your stock under bridge against nails as a stop. Right side of rail is keeper piece. He has a video of same using a flip stop. I don't think he wanted you to drill into your rail as that would not be so ez. But been wrong before.

I had thought that at first, but I did mention that I only had an STK and wasn't planning on getting a PBB, so I wasn't certain. I could see putting the nails into the STK's 1x4s, and getting the smart clamp system upgrade (or use the technique Joe posted) to clamp the 1/4" of board (in the 2 1/4" case). I'll have to think more about that...

I just noticed on the EZ site that there is a "short connector extrusion" already available that is tapped and "can be used to build your own fixtures". I bet a couple of those could be part of a jig for cutting face frames as well.


Carl,
Burt is a professional cabinetmaker and has shared lots of photos. His write ups are straight to the point. If you have the time, reviewing his photos and comments can be informative and a huge time saver.

Now, if I could just apprentice in his shop for 6 weeks....Promise I won't steal (too many) ideas.;) Only the EZ ones.

I'll have to make it a point to look through the older posts. This forum is great and has a lot of info, but it can be difficult to find what you are looking for at times (this is just the nature of forums I think). I'd love it if someone wrote a book (or made a video) about track saw basic techniques, also showing how to do specific projects with a track saw. Kreg has some nice videos where they show their pocket hole jig being used to build cabinets, built-ins, etc. I'd love to see something similar from EZ -- a project from start to finish, displaying different techniques and uses for the track saw.

Dino
06-04-2010, 03:33 AM
Could be wrong. But I think dino was talking about putting nails in the table 2" (plus kerf) on right side of track on bridge. Slide your stock under bridge against nails as a stop. Right side of rail is keeper piece. He has a video of same using a flip stop. I don't think he wanted you to drill into your rail as that would not be so ez. But been wrong before.

Stacey.
For narrow cuts on narrow wood you want the good piece under the rail.
Two nails are very easy to drill and use them as stops.
Similar to drilling jigs in the machine shops.
Best part?
$$$$$$.