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View Full Version : How do you get wood flat and parallel?


CarlB
06-23-2010, 01:32 AM
I don't have a jointer or thickness planer. When thinking about making face frames, I know it is crucial to have the wood be flat and parallel, as well as a uniform thickness. I'm wondering what people out there do to ensure that this is the case. Even buying S3S wood, it's not guaranteed to be flat, as it may have warped a bit since it was surfaced.

Does everyone have a jointer and planer, or are there other techniques one can use? I've seen posts here about edge jointing using the SSRK and a power hand planer, but I don't think this will work for face jointing (I could be wrong). I'd be interested in possible techniques using the EZ guide system, as well as just general techniques that you use to get wood to be flat.

Thanks,

Carl

Dino
06-23-2010, 01:39 AM
I don't have a jointer or thickness planer. When thinking about making face frames, I know it is crucial to have the wood be flat and parallel, as well as a uniform thickness. I'm wondering what people out there do to ensure that this is the case. Even buying S3S wood, it's not guaranteed to be flat, as it may have warped a bit since it was surfaced.

Does everyone have a jointer and planer, or are there other techniques one can use? I've seen posts here about edge jointing using the SSRK and a power hand planer, but I don't think this will work for face jointing (I could be wrong). I'd be interested in possible techniques using the EZ guide system, as well as just general techniques that you use to get wood to be flat.

Thanks,

Carl

Carl,
Anything can be done with the ez system but some times is better to use a planer.
We will intergrade the hand held planer into the ez system for surface planing but the capacity is limited to 3-1/2".
Waiting for samples of a 6" planer ( yes, made in China) that can increase the capacity.

The SSRK can do a great job for edge and surface planing.
You need to support the SSRK from both sides and use it as a bridge planer.
Like homemade jigs but much easier.

Burt
06-23-2010, 02:28 AM
Carl,

If you are planning to buy s3s stock, the ideal thing would be to have a planer. I have personally used Makita planers for years but they are among the most expensive. Check with Lowes, HD, Amazon, Etc. You should be able to find a cheap planer for the ball park of $200.

With the EZ equipment, you could buy S2S material instead of S3S. The EZ System is a super way to straightline rip material.

Do a little search and see what you can find in using the SRK as a jointer and as a Planer. Also search SSRK. Dik had a illustration on how to plane with the SRK.



Burt

Brian Kincaid
06-23-2010, 12:26 PM
Jointer and planer are tools that will make you very productive if you buy rough sawn lumber or lumber that has a tendency to move a little even after S2S/S3S/etc

My hardwood is all purchased from the sawmill rough. I allow it to dry in the rough then mill boards as they are needed for projects.

When milling I do the following:
1) crosscut to length + 3" or so then straight-line rip or joint an edge (EZ!)
2) rip to width + 1" or so depending on severity of cup (EZ!)
3) joint face then joint straight-line edge again to get it 90deg to face
4) plane opposite face
5) final dimension rip using reference edges from jointer (EZ!)

If I worked with milled lumber I would do things a little different but it would probably require a lot of belt sanding at the end of the process to even things out. I hope this helps a little.

-Brian

Bryan Parlor
06-23-2010, 05:47 PM
I'd be interested in possible techniques using the EZ guide system, as well as just general techniques that you use to get wood to be flat.
Thanks,
Carl

A couple of pictures of re-surfacing some legs for a hall bench using a hand power planer and the EZ system. The legs were originally off an old table.

The workpiece was sitting on the bench trapped by pieces of scrap screwed to the bench on three sides. Trapping avoids the need for clamps which would get in the way of the planer.

The finish was silky smooth.

A picture of the finished bench is attached.

Bryan

sean9c
06-23-2010, 07:05 PM
I also have a Bosch power plane and by coincidence used to today for the first time in a year or so. Using it sure reminded me what a sweet tool it is, nice and smooth and a great finish.

Bryan Parlor
06-23-2010, 11:01 PM
I've seen posts here about edge jointing using the SSRK and a power hand planer, but I don't think this will work for face jointing (I could be wrong). I'd be interested in possible techniques using the EZ guide system, as well as just general techniques that you use to get wood to be flat.
Thanks,
Carl

Using a hand power planer freehand requires a steady hand if you want a good finish. I can't reliably do it but here is a fool proof way to get precise thickness planning.

I needed to plane off the channels on the underside some hardwood flooring so I could use it on a project. I don't have planer and ended up using a hand power planer. It worked out very well - Silky smooth with just 0.1mm of snipe on the end.

The technique is to support the rear shoe of the planer on a reference piece (the same thickness as the final plank). The front shoe is then adjusted (depth of cut) to sit on the uncut workpiece.

A gap between the reference and workpiece allows the plane to startup without touching wood At the end of the cut there is a gap and a scrap piece of flooring to hold the front shoe at the right level until the blades clear the workpiece.

To plane in a single pass, the cut has to be less than the maximum depth of cut on the planer. In my case 3/32 would be the maximum I could cut (All the cuts in the photographs were done at 5/64in with excellent results).

If multiple cuts are needed spacers can be used corresponding to the depth of each cut. To do 1/4in cut in 4 passes use 1/16 in spacers and a 1/16in depth of cut. Assuming a starting thickness of 3/4in the rear shoe (reference piece) would be 1/2in thick and have 3-1/16 spacers. the front shoe (outfeed piece) would be 9/16in with 3-1/16 spacers (or 1/2 in+ 4-1/16 spacers). After each cut a spacer would be removed from each side so that both shoes are always flat and at the correct level.

Since clamps would get in the way of planning I trapped the workpiece by screwing some 1/4in scrap into the workbench and used clamps to prevent any side to side movement.

Bryan

CarlB
06-25-2010, 12:18 AM
Thanks for all of the ideas! I did some searching on the forum (as suggested) and found even more. I'll probably stick with S2S lumber for now (hopefully that will be good enough...), but eventually I'll be wanting to have more options. :)