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-   -   Panel glue up jig very simple project (http://tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=4436)

Goblu 05-24-2014 11:30 PM

Panel glue up jig/wedges very simple project
 
5 Attachment(s)
This is a very simple project, a jig made to glue up panels from milled wood boards. It consists of a largish piece of melamine with a fixed fence on one side and a moveable fence on the other. In between the moveable fence and the panel are wedges. It is really, really simple to cut these relatively small wedges (6" long) using the EZ system, and harder to do without EZ. I got it from a book by Danny Proulx, "50 shop made jigs and fixtures" and just did my first glue up with it and it works great so far. No more wrangling with clamps this way and that, while the boards slide around because they have glue on them, then come out needing lots of sanding.

This thing gets them flat quite easily. You have to fiddle a bit with the wedges, but maybe that's because I waxed them (duh). I waxed the melamine to repel glue and also the edges of the fences. Probably overkill, but it makes cleanup easier. I'm also going to experiment with different angles on the wedges. I think lesser angles might be better than what the plans called for. But, hey, I still have part of the poplar board I used.

Also, it's cheap. I used an old melamine door (very large size near the 24x30 the plan called for) that I salvaged. For the fences I used a finished shelf board that was also salvaged cut into a 6" piece and a 2" piece. A scrap piece of 3/4" poplar board for the wedges which are 6" long. Plus two 1/4-20 threaded knobs and t nuts. I glued and screwed the fixed fence in place, lotsa screws since it was slightly bowed.

It's highlighted here because of angles needed for the wedges are made simple by the EZ saw system, so it will be simple to experiment and find the right combination of angles, starting with 5 degrees. I have to say that this was the easiest panel I've ever glued up.

Dik Harrison 05-25-2014 12:38 PM

Katie,

I have a bucket full of wedges that I use for all kinds of things. I drilled two counter sunk holes (counter sunk on both sides) in each wedge so I can fasten one of the pair to the bench. I first used them a few years ago to hold together small frames for wine cork trivets that I used for Christmas gifts to the family (made the frames out of wood that held some meaning to the recipient). Since all the frames were the same size, I screwed down wedges to my bench, glued the corners and used the wedges to hold everything in place.

I think that somewhere I saw them called fox wedges, or something like that. Even found a video on using them (can't seem to find it now though).

Goblu 05-25-2014 02:29 PM

Dik, thanks for the info. That idea of attaching them to the bench sounds excellent! When I make some more I plan to use the countersink hole idea. Make a bunch of the holes before I cut the wedges.

Do you have an angle that you find works best for wedges? I think the ones I made had too great an angle. My research shows 4 degrees, but that's for mortise joint tightening.

Tw218 05-25-2014 06:44 PM

Hello all of you on the form it's been kind of quiet lately so I thought I would post a few pictures of my multifunction table cutting some Miters. A chopsaw would have been a lot easier but I wanted to see if I could do it I have a Jig from Rockler that is recessed in the tabletop
http://campl.us/hmURmPDiDJi

philb 05-25-2014 09:01 PM

A quoin ?
 
Katie: I was a printer for 30+ years and I was going to ask if that was your background. We used blocks called "furniture", and wedges called "Quoins" (pronounced -"coins"). The type was locked up in a metal frame called a "chase." Those are old letterpress days. I started in metal type in 1972 setting monotype (one letter at a time) out of a California Job Case. When I saw your set up, I thought for sure you were an old hand at printing.

Lex 05-27-2014 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by philb (Post 35930)
Katie: I was a printer for 30+ years and I was going to ask if that was your background. We used blocks called "furniture", and wedges called "Quoins" (pronounced -"coins"). The type was locked up in a metal frame called a "chase." Those are old letterpress days. I started in metal type in 1972 setting monotype (one letter at a time) out of a California Job Case. When I saw your set up, I thought for sure you were an old hand at printing.

Way back in Junior High, I took a year of graphic arts. It consisted of (among other things) setting lead type manually, pulling them from a California Job Case, and then printing using a hand-operated platen press. We also used the same lead type for making rubber stamps too. Fun times. I also like silk screen printing.

Goblu 05-27-2014 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tw218 (Post 35929)
Hello all of you on the form it's been kind of quiet lately so I thought I would post a few pictures of my multifunction table cutting some Miters. A chopsaw would have been a lot easier but I wanted to see if I could do it I have a Jig from Rockler that is recessed in the tabletop
http://campl.us/hmURmPDiDJi

Hi tw218, That's really neat jig/cutting table. I suggest you post it on the thread about the EZ project table to continue that discussion, Here's the link. Also any comments you have about how you made it, how it works, etc would be great.
http://www.tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=963

Goblu 05-27-2014 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by philb (Post 35930)
Katie: I was a printer for 30+ years and I was going to ask if that was your background. We used blocks called "furniture", and wedges called "Quoins" (pronounced -"coins"). The type was locked up in a metal frame called a "chase." Those are old letterpress days. I started in metal type in 1972 setting monotype (one letter at a time) out of a California Job Case. When I saw your set up, I thought for sure you were an old hand at printing.

Hi Phil, interesting about your background. Some transferrable skills to woodworking, I'd guess. I learned sewing in school, and these skills also transfer some to woodworking. I don't know anything about typesetting, but did see some references to it when I googled information about wedges in woodworking. Because the glueup for this was so easy and troublefree I plan to learn more about using wedges for clamping. Maybe I'll google quoins next and see what they have to say.

philb 05-27-2014 01:41 PM

Simple yet effective.
 
Katie: Quoins will not be any help in your endeavor. I was just curious if you had a printing background since the lock up was very similar to your design.

Yes it is very helpful design and wedges have been used in a variety of trades. It seems like many of our tools today rely on gadgets and electronics. It is nice to see a design that is simple yet effective. A tool that operates on brain power instead of batteries.

I had a table for woodworking in the early 70's. It had holes drilled every 6 inches in a square pattern. The kit for the table included wedges, and cams. It was incredibly flexible in terms of layout and very powerful. The design was so ingenious, and I was very disappointed to have lost the setup many years ago in a move. When I saw your design I thought of my printing years and that woodworking table. I have not seen the table kit offered anywhere, but it sure looks like you have found a reasonable replacement. Good job!

Goblu 05-27-2014 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by philb (Post 35937)
Katie: Quoins will not be any help in your endeavor. I was just curious if you had a printing background since the lock up was very similar to your design.

Yes it is very helpful design and wedges have been used in a variety of trades. It seems like many of our tools today rely on gadgets and electronics. It is nice to see a design that is simple yet effective. A tool that operates on brain power instead of batteries.

I had a table for woodworking in the early 70's. It had holes drilled every 6 inches in a square pattern. The kit for the table included wedges, and cams. It was incredibly flexible in terms of layout and very powerful. The design was so ingenious, and I was very disappointed to have lost the setup many years ago in a move. When I saw your design I thought of my printing years and that woodworking table. I have not seen the table kit offered anywhere, but it sure looks like you have found a reasonable replacement. Good job!

Sounds interesting! I've been thinking of making a tabletop/panel for the EZ One that has a hole pattern similar to what you mention. My woodworking shop space is very small, so I'm going with panels that can be moved in and out of the top of the EZ One. I'll keep my eyes open if I see such a kit, I'll post it here.


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