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Old 03-16-2016, 12:32 PM
jbrewton jbrewton is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Villa Rica, Ga
Posts: 15
Default Drawer Making

Last week I used the SSRK system to route some groves and rabbits for making drawer. I started off by inserting 3/4" ply into the rails. Using the SSRK, I 1/6 inch groove on the right edge of the insert to create a parallel line to the guide. I placed a piece of MDF (about the same length as the insert) along the groove and lined up everything. Set the SSRK up with a 1/8 bit on the guide side edge of MDF and ran one pass to trim edge parallel to the guide.

Using a bunch of scrap piece (same thickness material as the drawers) clamped all the drawer sides together to route the rabbit in multiple passes using a 1/2" bit. Did the same for the drawer bottom groove (paying closer attention to left side and right side), but I could only route 2 sides at a time using 1/4 bit.

All in all the process worked fine for me, but I am wondering how you guys setup for drawer making? Are you using the SSRK, or do you just rip (cit, them move, cut them move...) everything using the CS?

I know there is a video, and i watched it, where a jig was made. Is anyone using that jig?

Please share your thoughts.

John
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Old 03-16-2016, 03:35 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
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Originally Posted by jbrewton View Post
Last week I used the SSRK system to route some groves and rabbits for making drawer. I started off by inserting 3/4" ply into the rails. Using the SSRK, I 1/6 inch groove on the right edge of the insert to create a parallel line to the guide. I placed a piece of MDF (about the same length as the insert) along the groove and lined up everything. Set the SSRK up with a 1/8 bit on the guide side edge of MDF and ran one pass to trim edge parallel to the guide.

Using a bunch of scrap piece (same thickness material as the drawers) clamped all the drawer sides together to route the rabbit in multiple passes using a 1/2" bit. Did the same for the drawer bottom groove (paying closer attention to left side and right side), but I could only route 2 sides at a time using 1/4 bit.

All in all the process worked fine for me, but I am wondering how you guys setup for drawer making? Are you using the SSRK, or do you just rip (cit, them move, cut them move...) everything using the CS?

I know there is a video, and i watched it, where a jig was made. Is anyone using that jig?

Please share your thoughts.

John
My approach generally goes like this:

In the pics, you can see I've put permanent inserts into my EZ-1 table top. This facilitates most of what I use the EZ-1 for. The result is that I can quickly/safely set up for most routing tasks using the SSRK.

In the batch of drawers I'm currently making (pic 1), instead of using the dovetail jig to join the sides/front/back together, I opted for an interlocking joint (pic 2).

Pic 3 shows a setup for routing the 1/4" groove for the drawer bottoms. Material is butted against the track and against a stop on the front of the EZ-1; and then held captive with sliding stops on the front and the open side. Since the reference points for the groove are the track edge where the material is butted, and the track ridge where the SSRK rides, the groove for the drawer bottoms will all be located in the same place on each drawer. Initial setup is fast and easy; change-out from one piece to another is also quick: loosen the knob on the left stop, then the knobs on the front stop, change to a new piece, re-clamp stops, rout. I typically use 1/2" baltic birch ply, and rout the groove 1/4" deep. I rout in two passes- 1/8" each time; using a plunge router is key.

Pic 4 shows routing for the end interlock- similar to routing for the drawer bottom. Once set up, the stop on the end being routed is never moved till all ends are routed: material is fed under the track, pushed against the stops on the front of the EZ-1 and slid up to the 'non-moving-stop', additional sliding stop is also used to keep the material against the table-front-stops, and a longer stop is then used on the far side of the material. Doing it this way ensures that all ends will be done exactly the same since the reference points are: a) the track ridge for the SSRK; b) the front stop that never moves for the pieces being routed- if some pieces are longer/shorter than others, not an issue, since the positioning of the routed end never changes. Normally, when routing the ends, I'll 'gang-rout' them- in the pic, I only have one piece shown. Obviously, the router location for the sides is different than set-up for the ends, but the set-up principle is the same. To make it all work precisely, I utilize a digital caliper, like what's shown in the pic- really takes the guesswork out of the equation.

HTH,
Rick
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  #3  
Old 03-17-2016, 11:31 AM
jbrewton jbrewton is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Villa Rica, Ga
Posts: 15
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bumpnstump,

Thanks you for the details about your setup. Looks a lot like what I did, however your's is much more simple. Any reason why you route on the left side of the guild track? Love your sliding stop. I will need to make myself a few.
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Old 03-17-2016, 01:16 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 899
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Originally Posted by jbrewton View Post
bumpnstump,

Any reason why you route on the left side of the guild track?
I own an earlier model of the EZ-1 than the current model (see pic). The earlier models had a 'beam' that went down the middle of the table, front-to-back. While this allowed the cross-table extrusions to move front-to-back (as the current model does), they couldn't move side-to-side (which the current model can do). For the cross-table extensions, this model came with a short extension and a long extension- personal preference dictated which side of the 'beam' one would install the extensions. I chose short on left/longer on right. Configured this way makes my use of the SSRK easier on the short (ie left) side of the track.

In the pic, you can see I've added a few fixed inserts. I found I never used/needed the sliding cross-extension feature, but do use/appreciate the inserts. To facilitate the use of sliding stops (ie. lateral clamps), I either utilize the EZ extrusion slot, or, use T-nuts inserted into the bottom of the inserts. (A couple of the T-nuts can be seen laying on the table top in pic 3 of my post previous to this one.)

Rick
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