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Old 01-15-2011, 06:32 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Default Radial arm saws

Another not tracksaw related idle thought. It is dead wood though. I saw on another forum a guy all excited about buying a RAS and a bunch of other posters shared his feelings. I hate RAS's, thought they were really hard to control as the blade rotation sucks it into the material. Haven't used one in probably 35+yrs. Am I missing something?
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  #2  
Old 01-15-2011, 06:37 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Another not tracksaw related idle thought. It is dead wood though. I saw on another forum a guy all excited about buying a RAS and a bunch of other posters shared his feelings. I hate RAS's, thought they were really hard to control as the blade rotation sucks it into the material. Haven't used one in probably 35+yrs. Am I missing something?
sean,
the ras was designed to amputate and cut wood when used perfect.
if you feel like a perfect operator... this tool 4 you...not4me.
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  #3  
Old 01-15-2011, 06:57 PM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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There were much better built saws, and cheaper ones. I have an old DeWalt GWI, that is considered the wanted model. However I don't believe the saw is meant to use just on its own. There is a book that is recommended reading for the RAS, called the Mr. Sawdust work. He shows how to build the proper table (support is key here, like Dino's system), then some jigs and things you use with it to perform the tasks (like keeping and using the antikickback pawls).

I have been debating keeping mine, and incorporating the SME extrusions into the table, for hold downs, etc.
The thing that would make me get rid of it, is when Dino markets his miter/angle attachment.
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Old 01-15-2011, 07:19 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
There were much better built saws, and cheaper ones. I have an old DeWalt GWI, that is considered the wanted model. However I don't believe the saw is meant to use just on its own. There is a book that is recommended reading for the RAS, called the Mr. Sawdust work. He shows how to build the proper table (support is key here, like Dino's system), then some jigs and things you use with it to perform the tasks (like keeping and using the antikickback pawls).

I have been debating keeping mine, and incorporating the SME extrusions into the table, for hold downs, etc.
The thing that would make me get rid of it, is when Dino markets his miter/angle attachment.
Randal, 2012.
After we complete the ez U-turn to basic ez...we will
open the ez Panduras.
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  #5  
Old 01-15-2011, 08:27 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Another not tracksaw related idle thought. It is dead wood though. I saw on another forum a guy all excited about buying a RAS and a bunch of other posters shared his feelings. I hate RAS's, thought they were really hard to control as the blade rotation sucks it into the material. Haven't used one in probably 35+yrs. Am I missing something?
Sean,

A lot of guys are into "old iron" and like Randal said, the older dewalts are the most sought after. These are about as cheap as anything to buy. Most people lock them into a 90 degree cut and they staythere. As such they have a better cross cut capacity better than most items on the market.

The tendancy of a radial arm saw to self-feed really makes it dangerous. A negative rake blade really reduces that but it only takes once to get hurt.

From what I have seen in the forums, the same crowd that love their radial arm saw is the same crowd that only use their track system for plywood.

Before the EZ One and the new cross cut stops that Dino introduced along with it, one of the most used tools in my shop was a EZ cross cutter designed to cut up to about 25" widths. It is safe and very EZ to use. Having the Track going over the keepers, made it perfect for gang cross cuts. At the time Dino came out with the EZ One I was working on unifing one tool to do both cross cuts and rips. All I needed to complete it was Dino's stops.

I think that because of a few Die hards, the radial will always be here. I'm sure that whewn Dino hits with the mitering device a number of the radials will head to the scrap yard.

Burt
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  #6  
Old 01-17-2011, 05:39 PM
Tempest Tempest is offline
 
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I am, apparently, one of the diehards....and I'm not that old. It's my favorite tool in the shop.

Mine is a 12? year old Craftsman made by Emerson (at least the motor is). If you start turning it every which way and doing all kinds of weird setups it will get out of alignment. If you leave it as a dedicated cross cutter, it does well.

I have a Tenryu chop saw blade on mine (5 degree rake) and it literally polishes the end grain of red oak. No saw marks evident. It does take some doing to get it set up this way, but it holds forever. I can also shave off nearly immeasurable amounts of wood with it for a fine fit.

I actually consider it to be one of the safer tools in the shop. It leaves a nice clear line in front of the blade so there is no doubt where the danger is, and the blade is right in front of you (as opposed to a chop saw which comes down). I've had fewer close calls with this machine than most others.

It does want to self feed but I think most people that have a problem slap a steep hook blade on it and are surprised when it comes at them. A dull blade will also want to self feed more.

The induction motor is quiet and no need for start/stop when doing a lot crosscuts.
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  #7  
Old 05-24-2017, 11:07 AM
CharlesLamotte CharlesLamotte is offline
 
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Default Radial arm saws

A radial arm saw is a cutting machine consisting of a circular saw mounted on a sliding horizontal arm. I've had radial arm saw for several years now but never used it. The motor may make odd sounds, or seize up for no seemingly good reason. Radial arm saws are considered a riskier option. The presence of a maneuverable blade raises the probability of accidents.
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  #8  
Old 05-24-2017, 03:31 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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I bought a Radial Arm Saw, oh, maybe 27 years ago as my first big power tool - mostly because I didn't have much space and felt that it might do more with less space.

I used to to finish the inside of a horse barn, and for rough cuts on large 2x's, such as 2x12's it did very good.

Its sat unused for maybe 15 years now, and I'm struggling to come up with a reason to move it when we sell the house and retire in a few years.

Ken K.
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