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  #1  
Old 02-20-2018, 07:20 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 271
Default Using the UEG without a Guide Rail

I was thinking about the big picture of the process to use the EZSMART tools to cut down plywood to the necessary size for, say, cabinetry.

I have a pickup truck, so I'm bringing full 4x8 foot plywood sheets home, and not planning on doing an initial cut down to an easier to handle size - for example, into 4x4 foot sheets, or similar.

The EZSMART Universal Edge Guide (UEG) is used to rip down plywood to the needed width.

Then the EZSMART Miter Square is then used to crosscut the plywood to the required lengths. To ensure repeatability in those cut lengths I'd tend to recommend use of the EZSMART Cabinet Maker.

For me, since I have the EZ-One, I'd be using that to create VERY repeatable length cuts.

My question is, if someone is trying to minimize the total EZSMART cost investment, do you think that they could NOT purchase EZSMART Guide Rail(s) that would be necessary to make an initial rip along one edge of the plywood to ensure that edge is perfectly straight?
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Old 02-20-2018, 10:02 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 216
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I think you'll always need a reliable way to square up your material. Aside from being rough and ugly, I don't trust a factory edge. So, it will have to be EZ (or similar) or a table saw. The UEG with cabinet maker set wins hands down for safety, cost, portability, and speed.

If you go with the EZ1, then a system like Festool's MFT and one of their saws starts looking more reasonable. Either way, the UEG stays.

Point is the table saw is by no means the best way to break down sheet goods.
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  #3  
Old 02-24-2018, 04:01 PM
Dino Dino is offline
Master Carpenter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
Posts: 5,090
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
I was thinking about the big picture of the process to use the EZSMART tools to cut down plywood to the necessary size for, say, cabinetry.?
Kenk,
If you only have one ez track and the ez base....
the entire system is based on the track....unlimited functionality and very easy friendly to modify and adapt.

We're at the cross roads of the new woodworking.
Why I don't think of that before?.....is going to come up unlimited times.

The ez goal was to do it all with only few tools.
But people like me and you are laez and we want everything ready.
we believe that a factory tool is always better.
I believe that a new and simple way can outperform all tools.

The new ez will get a touch of this. the hybrid ez...
You want better square cuts or better squares?
do you think a perfect square will give you a perfect cut? we tried that.
To many variables ...
( Extrusions, holes, drill bits, boring bits, special washers, CNC's,
$1500.00 Vices, fly-cutters ...to prep one piece of aluminum
and square it to the best extrusion.
include the human factor, the edge of the panel...the heavy hands...
and you guarantee to have a non square cut with the best square.

Here is the new ez square. Eliminate all variables...even the square.
welcome to ez again and again.

tx
d
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  #4  
Old 03-05-2018, 10:55 AM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 245
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
I think you'll always need a reliable way to square up your material. Aside from being rough and ugly, I don't trust a factory edge. So, it will have to be EZ (or similar) or a table saw. The UEG with cabinet maker set wins hands down for safety, cost, portability, and speed.

If you go with the EZ1, then a system like Festool's MFT and one of their saws starts looking more reasonable. Either way, the UEG stays.

Point is the table saw is by no means the best way to break down sheet goods.
Couldn't agree more. I have a lot of difficulty any more handling a whole sheet of plywood on the table saw, so would agree that the UEG is indispensable when it comes to the initial breakdown of a sheet of plywood. With the long fence able to bridge minor low spots, I find it isn't necessary to make an initial pass with a track to remove the factory edge - I just work the edge with a coarse sanding block to knock off any high spots, and cut the first piece about 1/4" wider than finished width so I can trim the factory edge off on the second pass.
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  #5  
Old 03-05-2018, 01:45 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 642
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
Couldn't agree more. I have a lot of difficulty any more handling a whole sheet of plywood on the table saw, so would agree that the UEG is indispensable when it comes to the initial breakdown of a sheet of plywood. With the long fence able to bridge minor low spots, I find it isn't necessary to make an initial pass with a track to remove the factory edge - I just work the edge with a coarse sanding block to knock off any high spots, and cut the first piece about 1/4" wider than finished width so I can trim the factory edge off on the second pass.
Over 10 years ago stalling a sheet of ply on my 3HP Uni convinced me I needed a track system and that's how I stumbled on EZ. With ply it's been my experience and based on others that the long sides are very reliable - thus the value in the UEG. My HUGE EZ herd has been reduced to UEG and Square.
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