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Old 09-27-2011, 11:54 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 403
Default New Workshop

I am finally getting started on making a shop out of my detached garage. For the last year I have been using a bedroom (15' X 15') in my house as a workshop. I had remodelled the entire house stripping it down to the studs, new electric, new plumbing, moving a couple of walls, and putting it all back together. During the remodel the bedroom was used to do all the work including a kitchen. All work was done with the EZ system except for some of the trim where a mitre saw was used, yes you can do a whole house from start to finish without a table saw. The point has now come that I need the bedroom as a bedroom.

The garage is 21' X 21' so it will be a much nicer space to work in. It has a gravel floor so first on the list of things to do is poor a slab. I am starting with 1/2 of the garage right now because the price of concrete is high. I will do the other side in the spring. The slab will be 6" thick. It needs to be strong enough for working on cars. I have a small tractor which helped with the digging but I had to use a pic to dig out about 1/3 of the floor. I live in the mountains and hit rock I would have left the rock but that would mean that the slab would only be about an 1" thick in spots and that is no good. At least I have a good base that will not settle. The cement is being delivered at 1:00 this afternoon

The next step will be a wall covering. I am going as cheap as possible with this project and will be using reclaimed bunk beds. The collage that I work for just put all new furniture in the dorms and I am taking the old bunk beds which were considered scrap. They are made out of 3/4" ply. The EZ rails will be used to cut the large peices of ply from the beds and used on the walls. This is ideal for a shop. No need to find studs to mount shelves or to hang things up. Screws or nails can be put anywhere. Also part of this phase will be installing outlets and 2 separate circuits. I like to keep lighting and power tools on different circuits. I hate the feeling of popping a breaker and being left in the dark holding tools that are still spinning.

The next step is installing an old wood stove that I got dirt cheap. I have a few acres with plenty of dead trees to cut down. Plus the stove is a great way to get rid of all my scrap and I have a shed full of it left over from remodelling the house.

I will also be installing the original kitchen cabinets that I took out of the house, both uppers and lowers. They will provide much needed storage and a nice long workbench that will have a mitre saw and a EZ crosscutter incorporated into it.

Bellow is a picture of the site formed out and ready for cement.
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File Type: jpg 2011-09-25_Shop Floor 01.jpg (51.9 KB, 121 views)
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  #2  
Old 09-27-2011, 12:02 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Location: West Virginia
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Design recommendations and tips are welcome. Please post suggestions about what things you would like to see in a new shop put together around the EZ system?

Last edited by Ken; 09-27-2011 at 11:57 PM.
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  #3  
Old 09-27-2011, 12:03 PM
bigjohn1 bigjohn1 is offline
 
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Default Ken

What a great setup to have I would love to have the space keep us posted with update pics as you go if you have time.
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Old 09-27-2011, 01:31 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Location: Evans, GA
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Ken,

Sounds great. Looks like you have most everything covered. Good luck.
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  #5  
Old 09-27-2011, 03:41 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Location: Sumter, SC
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Ken,

It looks like you are on your way to a nice shop.

For some time, I have been think of opurchasing a portable building and putting it on the lot with my house so I can sell my current shop and pay off some bills - courtesy of the recession and medical problems. I'm retirement age but need to clear some bills to make life more comfortable.

Anyway, I've been building some cabinets for my shop that are a bit different. All are on wheels. The largest is about 30" wide, has 10 drawers - full ext glides - 1/2" dwr bottoms, etc. Above a work surface it has 2 shelves divided for drills and impact drivers. The lower of the two shelves is set for makita 18 volt stuff - 3 impacts, 5 drills. the upper shelf is set for 10 of the makita 10.8 or 12 volt tools. currently it is holding 5 impacts and 5 drills. (I hit some super deals or I wouldn't have nearly as many tools. The drawers hold a bit of anything: tape measures, utility knives, screw drivers, wrenches, tap and dye, ice grips, pliers, squares, etc. On the ends I have mounted yard sticks, hammers, more screwdriver, square, quick clamp, etc. It is all mounted on a lowes moving cart (Carpet covered, 4 wheel, $20 something. Thus far it is a life saver. Above all, one very simple piece of advice - if you have it- put it on wheels. Sooner or later it will need to move.

Burt
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Old 09-27-2011, 05:02 PM
Bill Griggs Bill Griggs is offline
 
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You might want to check your insurance before you put a wood stove in a wood shop.

Bill
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:26 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Location: West Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Griggs View Post
You might want to check your insurance before you put a wood stove in a wood shop.

Bill
I know what you are saying but I am not worried about it, I have already checked about a stove in a garage but didn't specify the use. Things like this are very common here in W.V. There is a lot of wood heat in the state, I burn wood in my house to. As long as I do the installation according to code it will be fine. I use water based finishes and dust collection on all tools so I am not worried about combustibles. Actually the fluids for use with mechanical work are more flammable then the woodworking that I do. A little common sense goes a long way!
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Old 09-27-2011, 10:41 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Location: West Virginia
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Burt,

Good idea to put everything on wheels. I have some shelving that will be on wheels and also plan to build a movable wood cart. About 5 years ago I sold all of my "big iron". Stationary tools are to much of a hassle when moving which I did a few times since then. Plus they can't be taken to a job site, brought in a house, or taken outside on a nice day. The only stationary tool that I still own is a Shopsmith and it is on wheels. I don't know if it really should be considered stationary since I can carry it around by myself. The Shopsmith is my drill press, band saw, and sanding station. I have a joiner for it to but have not used it in a few years since it is much easier and safer to straight line rip an edge on the PBB. The only reason that I keep the joiner is for when I work with rough lumber. EZ has taken over and pushed everything else out. The result is that the fun is back in woodworking now that the dangerous tools have been put out to pasture.
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Old 09-27-2011, 11:10 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Location: West Virginia
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I poured the slab today. It looks a little blotchy in the pictures because it is still green. It has been several years since I have worked with cement. I forgot just how much work it is especially when the shoot doesn't reach. I did have 1 grunt for a helper. 3 people is even better. With 3 people 2 can screed and the 3rd can push more mud or pull back the excess.

The stove will go in the back left hand corner roughly where it is sitting in the pictures. Behind the stove I will put cement board on the wall and also a heat shield. Triple wall pipe will be used through the roof. The stove will sit it on some blocks for now to keep it off of the gravel until I finish the cement in that half of the garage.

Next I will start on some wiring. I like to have lots of outlets. I completely stripped and rewired my house as part of the remodel so I have a whole house worth of scrap wire. It will be more then enough to complete this small project. I think I will put in a few overhead outlets next to overhead hose connections/blast gates. This will keep the cord and hose suspended over the PBB and more importantly out of my way. The overhead outlets will run to the dust collectors power sensing receptacle. There is a 220 line in the garage that comes from the house. The line is only 12 gauge and will have to do for now. Later it will be replaced with 8 gauge.

This weekend I will be picking up the bunk beds and start breaking them down to cover the interior walls.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2011-09-27_19-22-04_890.jpg (105.9 KB, 87 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-09-27_19-22-15_462.jpg (104.1 KB, 92 views)

Last edited by Ken; 09-29-2011 at 01:49 PM.
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  #10  
Old 10-03-2011, 04:59 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: West Virginia
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I started some of the electrical work in the garage. I also picked up a dozen of the old beds from the college dorm, took them apart, and started using the ply to cover the walls. I do not have a picture of this yet but will post one tonight. The goal is to do this as cheap as possible (the beds were free). The boards that you see on the lower part of the walls are left over from a sub floor. The dimensions worked out perfect without any cutting required. The floor cut off on the bottom and 2 sheets of ply from the beds laid horizontally over that adds up to 8' tall. I have enough wood to do 2 of the three walls like this. The 4th wall is mostly 1 large garage door.

As a side note making cut outs for windows and doors is a pleasure to do with a rail. Plunge cuts are simple on the EZ system unlike they were on the Festool saw and tracks that I had 5 years ago. The potential of a kickback was always in my mind and as a result carpentry was not as fun or safe as it is now.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2011-09-30_Beds 1 lowres.jpg (91.3 KB, 87 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-09-30_Beds 2 lowres.jpg (86.4 KB, 77 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-10-02_Electric 1 lowres.jpg (107.2 KB, 78 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-10-02_Electric 2 lowres.jpg (103.1 KB, 78 views)
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