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  #11  
Old 12-07-2016, 01:04 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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I started off with the original Smart Table with the plastic moldings and was happy with it while I was cutting up partial sheets of plywood, but felt that it didn't provide enough support at the ends when ripping full sheets. I even went as far as buying more of the plastic moldings (all that EZ had left as they had replaced them with the current product) to build a larger table but felt that it still wasn't providing enough support at the ends, plus it was getting difficult to lift and store. I build an open-grid support using strips of plywood and have been very happy with that. Like the Smart Table, it also provides space for clamps when used as an assembly table.

If anyone is interested, I'm thinking about selling the plastic moldings - the complete original set plus another half dozen or so pairs - let me know and we can work out an equitable price.
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  #12  
Old 12-07-2016, 02:05 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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I have a bunch of tables that I made which look like this:



Normally I put a double thickness of MDF on them with a sheet of Masonite on top, perhaps I could simply use it as is, or add something sacrificial, or even your pieces. The top measures 2'x4' (they are pretty easy to knock out so I have a bunch).

I was trying to think of a way, not only to have support, but perhaps even something I could attach the bridge to. (If it works the way I think) But it seems like it needs or should be attached to some kind of extrusion though I am not quite sure.

What am I looking at for those plastic pieces?

Last edited by Absinthe; 12-07-2016 at 02:17 PM. Reason: one more picture try
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  #13  
Old 12-07-2016, 05:55 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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As for using a router on the UEG, I once made a base out of HMWP and did just that. It was nice and stable for really long grooves and dadoes less than 24" from the edge of material but that's about it. I'm my experience, there are better methods. The SSRK and M-Power CRB7 are my favorites.
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  #14  
Old 12-07-2016, 08:54 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Oh, I missed that you wanted to do it on the UEG. I am just not sure why it is $200 t use it on the ez track...
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  #15  
Old 12-07-2016, 10:08 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post

I was trying to think of a way, not only to have support, but perhaps even something I could attach the bridge to. (If it works the way I think) But it seems like it needs or should be attached to some kind of extrusion though I am not quite sure.
Absinthe,
the EZ-bridge parts can be mounted in any way that is convenient; they don't necessarily need a piece of extrusion to mount to. They can be permanently screwed to something, if need be. Mounting them to an extrusion allows for easier removal and for adjusting.

If you make your own bench, you can use one or two rows of commonly available aluminum t-track (eg: http://www.orangealuminum.com/t-slot...s/t-track.html) vs. EZ extrusions. Or, if you're adventurous, make your own t-track out of wood.

Earlier this year, I made an EZ-bridge mounting system to adapt to my inlaw's existing workbench. The workbench was a simple 2 x 4 frame/legs w/a 3/4" ply top, overhanging the 2 x4 frame by ~5" on all sides. They wanted to be able to mount the bridges when needed; be able to mount them across the short dimension of the table sometimes; long dimension other times; and, be able to remove everything when it was not needed and in the way.

To accomplish this, I made a couple of identical, mount-under-the-plywood-top brackets. (Pic 1) I had a bit of extra EZ B2B on hand, so used it for my mounting extrusion. If I hadn't had the B2B, I would have used alum. t-track.

Pic 2 shows one of the mounting brackets clamped to a piece of ply, for mock-up purposes; the other bracket is sitting on top, showing the backside angle braces to keep it square and rigid.

To mount this on their table (sorry, I didn't take pics), I made a drilling jig to drill thru their 3/4" top, into inserts located in my brackets. I used the drilling jig to go all the way around their table top so they could mount these brackets anywhere they wanted to. In addition, by using B2Bs, I can loosen knobs on the backside and slide the B2Bs along the length of their respective brackets. The EZ bridge components easily slide into/out-of the B2Bs when necessary. Works perfectly for their needs.

Not sure if this is helpful in your situation, but thought I'd mention it just in case.
Rick
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  #16  
Old 12-07-2016, 10:43 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Don't underestimate the SSRK. It offers fast, accurate, and repeatable control and adjustment of X and Y axiis while others only give you X and limited, if any, of Y. It's actually a bargain at $200. The only way I could do it better is a CNC for 15x the price and it wouldn't be portable.

The M-Power CRB7 kit is about $130 or so. The time it saved paid for itself in one job.

Before I purchased them, I watched the videos several times. I asked myself, "How often do I need to do what this does?" and "What would it take for me to do it another way and how long?"

If you don't need it, it's definitely not worth it. I did and it was.
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  #17  
Old 12-08-2016, 08:27 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Thank Rick,

That does seem helpful if I get to building a table.

From what I am seeing, most of the videos seem to show work with a table of some sort (ez-1 or pbb etc) but I am not finding a lot that shows working with the cabinet maker (I guess that is just the new name for the square.) It seems like that part becomes extraneous once you have a bridge and some sort of fence (repeatably) squared to it. That may be ultimately the best route but for now I assume I should focus on a work flow using what I bought instead of what I will buy next year or the year after that

Oh, yeah, thanks for the link to OrangeAluminum too that looks like it may be helpful in more ways than just this project in the future.
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  #18  
Old 12-08-2016, 08:37 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
Don't underestimate the SSRK. It offers fast, accurate, and repeatable control and adjustment of X and Y axiis while others only give you X and limited, if any, of Y. It's actually a bargain at $200. The only way I could do it better is a CNC for 15x the price and it wouldn't be portable.

The M-Power CRB7 kit is about $130 or so. The time it saved paid for itself in one job.

Before I purchased them, I watched the videos several times. I asked myself, "How often do I need to do what this does?" and "What would it take for me to do it another way and how long?"

If you don't need it, it's definitely not worth it. I did and it was.
I don't mean to underestimate it, and with some further investigation I see that the SSRK provides quite a bit of axis manipulation. I can see why there might be benefit to all that movement. Of course, for me at present, I want to make a dado at the same distance from the back of my end panels and top and bottom to hold a back panel... I need to be able to do that consistently and repeatably, for the moment, the stacked dado in the tablesaw with the fence seems to be the way to go. Although once the router table is setup, that might become a router table solution instead. But who knows?

My main goal with this system is primarily building cabinets. I saw a video someone had been working on some kind of indexing system so that they could do the line boring but I have not seen more come from it, I think it was perhaps a prototype to something "to come" but I am pretty sure it was from like 2009. Let me see if I can find it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUpzSFHR06U
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  #19  
Old 12-08-2016, 01:58 PM
WatchurFingers WatchurFingers is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
I've been hoping that Eurekazone will come out with a non circular saw EZ Smart Base that would allow mounting of routers and other tools. This would let use use routers and more with the UEG.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Isn't that what the SSRK was supposed to do?
It can do similar, but the SSRK references off a guide rail. The UEG references off an edge of your subject. There are some images of a planer on a SSRK around here, but if it (or a circular saw, or a jig saw, etc) had two mountimg points, like a router, then people would have long ago, done something similar for a parallel edge.
There are many ways to make a edge guide, and there is an old book, available in the library, from someone that made her own Edge guide years ago. (pre Eurekazone) Carol Reed "aka The Router Lady", Router Joinery Workshop. There is also another good router book, or two, by Bill Hylton. I would recommend checking both out.
Also, for uniformly spaced dado's you can find ways of making jigs, via Youtube. Here is one common one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBpluWPMJNQ
The EZ router guides, reference off the rail (and use stops for consistency):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHgFTNnW3mo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
I don't mean to underestimate it, and with some further investigation I see that the SSRK provides quite a bit of axis manipulation. I can see why there might be benefit to all that movement. Of course, for me at present, I want to make a dado at the same distance from the back of my end panels and top and bottom to hold a back panel... I need to be able to do that consistently and repeatably, for the moment, the stacked dado in the tablesaw with the fence seems to be the way to go. Although once the router table is setup, that might become a router table solution instead. But who knows?

My main goal with this system is primarily building cabinets. I saw a video someone had been working on some kind of indexing system so that they could do the line boring but I have not seen more come from it, I think it was perhaps a prototype to something "to come" but I am pretty sure it was from like 2009. Let me see if I can find it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUpzSFHR06U
http://www.tracksawforum.com/showthr...+bridge&page=3
With this homemade track mount, you could use one of your tables, and line up your parts and do them all at once. The limiting factors would be your table size and your guide rail size.

You mentioned the Cabinetmaker, and I don't see any video's on it, but it adds a stop, to the square, so you could do larger panels then you could with the UEG. You could probably add extensions to the UEG, but it appears to have a built in tape measure, so you would not be able to use that past the factory settings. (24" I believe)
The difference I see, is that with a cabinetmaker, you end up with one corner that is at 90, if your square is set for that.
Line boring of holes, what was taught to me was to use a piece of pegboard to drill the holes in plexi/acrylic, plastic you have laying around. Then you put a thin strip on end (have some slots so you can slide spacing), that is tightened with (they used wingnuts, I prefer knobs), so you can adjust your depth.
It depends on what your doing, but I could see the SSRK being more useful, if you do a lot of fluted dado's, then regular. (everyone's needs are not the same)
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  #20  
Old 12-08-2016, 02:00 PM
WatchurFingers WatchurFingers is offline
 
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Default Earlier question on voids

You said you ordered the 54" SYSTEM. The system contains clamps, and the voids give you places for your clamps to go, so your cutoff is supported on the table, not off (what if your keeper is the cutoff).
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