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  #11  
Old 12-13-2016, 04:15 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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For demo work I now use a reciprocating saw, and just use the circular saw for cutting junk pieces to size to fit in the car and take them to the dump. In the past, I just grabbed this saw and chewed anything apart that needed to be chewed up. When I changed the blade I noticed the previous one was actually missing some carbide teeth. I honestly couldn't tell when the prior time I changed the blade on it was. That has to mean more than 10 years. I doubt this is an adjustable thing, so as it is this saw is a rather blunt instrument. Probably still good for hacking big wood into little wood for the scrap pile, but definitely not good for accurate work, even with that handy-dandy plywood blade on it (Lipstick on a pig).

The blade was fine (though it may be screwed up now from all the getting stuck) it was brand new last week 140 tooth plywood blade. But what I noticed was, if I laid the saw on the motor with the blade label facing up I could grab 2 sides of the blade and pull up with a definite "clunk" at the end to the tune of almost 1/8". I don't know if this is some kind of play in the gears, or bushing or what. I know it can't be good, but I also know that the new Bosch doesn't have this behavior.
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  #12  
Old 12-13-2016, 10:49 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Okay, I seem to have somewhat of a handle on the track/sawbase/cabinet maker combination.

So, I moved on to the UEG. This is much heavier than I initially thought. Also, laying a board down on my table and trying to run this along it seriously causes the board to slide away. I first tried clamping the board down, but after the first cut, the clamps would have been in the way. I then took a quick few pieces of cut-off scrap and stapled them to my table so that I had 3 points of contact (two opposite the saw, and one in front of the board. I also determined that there is no possible way that the riving knife lines up with the cut, so I removed that. With all that, and a firm hand on the handle I sliced away until I had to put a new panel on and didn't realize it completely overhung the table and at the end of that cut there was a board hitting the floor and the saw bumped up into the piece that was still on the table and a good general bit of heart racing, expletives and profanity followed. No personal injury and just a minor scratch to the wood, no harm no foul.

So how should I be using the UEG, and what is the best way to set this table up? I will generally be dealing with panels that are never any larger than 36x48. I will examine the riving knife tomorrow and see why it doesn't seem to line up.

By the way, if I haven't said it yet, thanks for bearing with me on this journey.
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  #13  
Old 12-14-2016, 08:46 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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So glad that yourself, your gear, and maybe your pride are intact after gravity played a trick on you.

I know several have had to sand down the fin to make it slide nicely through the kerf. Hopefully that alone might have been why the wood was being pushed so bad.

Now I find myself wondering if the fin on my newly attached Smart Base is properly aligned with the blade, but its currently 6 degrees F outside - just too dang cold to go out and check.

What are you using as a cutting surface? Can you take some pictures?

Personally, I enjoy hearing about your journey. Folks here want to help and others - myself included - will learn from your experiences.

Ken K
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  #14  
Old 12-14-2016, 09:31 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Everything is in tact. I assume once I reformat back to track saw mode I will easily enough trim off the bad spot on that piece and all will be fine.

I am using a table without a top.Corner to corner that measures 2'x4'

I took the air-nailer and and quickly stapled a few pieces of scrap to 2 of the cross pieces and one to the very front to hook the panel in so I could complete the cut, but that will not be the final solution, obviously .

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  #15  
Old 12-14-2016, 09:34 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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the quick peek at the fin before I removed it suggested, at least to my eye, that it didn't even come close to where the kerf was. But, I admit now that I was more interested in getting a successful cut than actually analyzing what was going wrong. I just knew that when the fin got to the edge of the plywood it made a serious resounding "clunk" and there was no more forward motion. It seemed to me to be completely outside the kerf, but I will know better with some controlled testing.
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  #16  
Old 12-14-2016, 09:36 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Actually, if one could rig a fin for both the front and the back of the base in line, that along with the blade might be a better way of aligning the base when attaching to the saw. Just a thought.
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  #17  
Old 12-14-2016, 02:33 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Never bothered with the Fin. It's not the same width as the blade anyway. Didn't see the need when cutting sheet goods. Maybe worth it when cutting lumber that might have stress in it but then just use a little shim.
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  #18  
Old 12-14-2016, 03:51 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Depending on what I see tonight, I may have the same attitude.
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  #19  
Old 12-15-2016, 03:44 PM
WatchurFingers WatchurFingers is offline
 
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Your surface is going to be cut on and sometimes into this table, correct?
Then something to consider, is putting a screw at the front side of your plywood, to help keep it from moving forward.
There is also some rubber type "shelf liner/paper" (don't know the real name), in stores that tends to be a colored version of what is sold as a router mat. It might give some grip.

I like the idea of the fin, but I don't see different ones, so how would I get one to match my blade? What happens if the new blade is thicker?
Besides maybe wet wood, how often would one need it? I think for long pieces, I could use an old nail, where the head would keep it from falling through, while the body would part the two pieces. Maybe I could drill the back of the saw for one to go through, if I want it close to the blade.
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  #20  
Old 12-15-2016, 04:20 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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There is a picture of my table about 4 messages back. I took the top off of it and have been cutting on the remaining framework, and yes into the wood as well. I have a top for it which is a double piece of MDF which I may be putting back on because it seems like I am not gaining much with the voids and I don't mind scarring the MDF. I took it off initially because I figured I needed holes like the guys with the grid systems have to allow for the clamps, but I have been trying to do things, like using the "cabinet maker" and the UEG which don't require the clamps, though I have had to use them anyway so there's that.

I thought maybe I needed more support so I actually setup and cut on the edge of the frame which introduced Mr Blade to Mr Screw with some pretty sparks, hopefully that will be ok.

I have finished the book shelf which had to be done last night so my wife could paint it and do her part before taking it up to my daughter, having ultimately go to the table saw to finish one of the pieces because I lost all confidence in the system at hand. Now that I am not under any time pressures I can setup and cut all the test pieces and run whatever test cases necessary to get this thing to cut with some confidence.

First thing I have to do is figure out how to successfully cut the anti-chip strip. I have messed up 2 of them so far and have more on the way. I can't imagine it should be so difficult to do, but I guess if it can be screwed up, I am the one to do it Any suggestions? I seem to get so far through the process when it gets grabbed and ripped by the blade leaving either a not-straight edge or a too small cut edge such that it doesn't rest against the blade when the saw is just sitting on the track resulting in a strip that can't effectively be lined up to a pencil line to cut with.

I am open to all sorts of suggestions, I like the anti-slip matt as well as the screw idea. Anything else would be appreciated. The frustration level is getting high, I am sure the time pressure didn't help matters much either. But now I am under no pressure and I can simply make lots of big wood into little wood in the hopes of tuning this thing and gaining confidence before I undertake a real project that I care about.
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