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  #1  
Old 01-22-2017, 08:54 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 271
Default Nailers for Woodworking

A few years back I purchased one of those Porter Cable kits that came with an 18 gauge nailer, a 16 gauge nailer, and a crown stapler.

I've been reading about pin nailers and thinking about buying one. The use would be mostly for securing two pieces together while glue dries.

My question is, in your experience, are they worth the $100 or so? Or will the 16 gauge nailer work just fine?
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  #2  
Old 01-22-2017, 09:10 AM
redoleary redoleary is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Battle Creek MI
Posts: 43
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I have no experience with them, but the Harbor Freight pin nailer gets decent reviews and you could buy a new one every time you needed it, and it would still take a while to get to $100.
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  #3  
Old 01-22-2017, 11:47 AM
Jeff Freelove Jeff Freelove is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Round Rock, Texas
Posts: 147
Default Pinners - Availability breeds use

Pin nailers have several advantages:

1. the nail head is amazingly small = less to fill it (if filled at all)
2. unlikely to split small <1/2" trim and other small pieces
3. Easy to cut or put thru pins in a mistake with less marring of the wood
4. Cheap fasteners
5. 1/2" to 2" length
6. great to close up the gap on moldings....angle the pins for more holding power. (Thanks Rick)
7. can be used to lightly tack

Used mine this weekend to clean up door casing corners. Now, they will stay tight. They compliment my brad and trim guns.

Last edited by Jeff Freelove; 01-23-2017 at 12:39 AM. Reason: Rick was right
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  #4  
Old 01-22-2017, 11:49 AM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 245
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I use mine for tacking edge banding in place, stops it from slipping while I "clamp" it with tape. They are good for installing small trim as the pins are very hard to see - good for installing finished trim when installing a kitchen. The small size of the pin works for small sections where a brad nail would split the wood. I get a lot of use out of mine.
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  #5  
Old 01-22-2017, 02:15 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
A few years back I purchased one of those Porter Cable kits that came with an 18 gauge nailer, a 16 gauge nailer, and a crown stapler.

I've been reading about pin nailers and thinking about buying one. The use would be mostly for securing two pieces together while glue dries.

My question is, in your experience, are they worth the $100 or so? Or will the 16 gauge nailer work just fine?
Great responses from the previous posters. I didn't buy one till a few years ago- quickly realized I should have bought it sooner..... I love mine.
The only thing I might add to the other posts is that the pin nails don't draw the pieces being nailed together like the heavier gauge nails do; ie. if you have, say, a 1/8" gap between the piece being nailed and the piece it's being nailed into, shooting off the pin nail probably won't pull that gap tight. So, when you use the nailer, be sure to push the wood together firmly before firing.
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  #6  
Old 01-23-2017, 06:31 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 216
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I have to concur with my colleagues. A pin nailer is a great assembly help to hold the piece together until the glue dries.

Once I got over the fact that most glue is stronger than wood, it really sped up my work, especially with drawers and such. Now, I only use fancy joinery for aesthetics (and charge a premium!).
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  #7  
Old 01-23-2017, 08:42 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 271
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Thanks for all of your replies. It certainly sounds like the 23 gauge nailer is a usefull thing to have.

Now, what are your thoughts on getting a low cost Harbor Freight nailer (or other very low cost nailer) versus spending more $$ for a brand name nailer?
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  #8  
Old 01-23-2017, 11:04 PM
Jeff Freelove Jeff Freelove is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Round Rock, Texas
Posts: 147
Default Which one?

It's all about capacity. It was especially helpful to have 2" pins when I was installing 5 1/2" base on columns with rounded corners. It held the small corner pieces very well. I have a Senco 23lxp

My free advice is buy a well rated pinner with 2" capacity if there is ever a chance you might do crown or base moldings and want to minimize caulking.
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  #9  
Old 01-24-2017, 04:18 PM
Todd Todd is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 15
Default Grex 23 Gauge Pinner

I own a Grex 23 Gauge Nailer. It works extremely well, but was on the pricey side. It takes up to 2" pins.
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  #10  
Old 01-31-2017, 05:40 PM
Derrell Derrell is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 31
Default HF Pin Nailer

I have a pin nailer from HF and have had good luck with it. You don't have much to loose by trying it out - especially with a 20 % off coupon. I'll also add that I have several other nail and staple guns from HF and they have been a good value for me. I add a few drops of oil each time before use and I haven't had any real issues. I wouldn't hesitate to get any of them again, and this is especially true of the pin nailer.

Last edited by Derrell; 01-31-2017 at 05:43 PM. Reason: adding more ingo
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