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  #21  
Old 06-05-2017, 03:22 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Yes, the Parf Dogs are one of those "Why didn't/couldn't I think of that ideas" - and by a fellow Brit too.

I understand the limited disposable income situation completely, believe me. However, a little thinking will show a way around that.

- start with your piece of plywood. Drill (2) holes in line and approx. 90 to the top edge to give a snug fit on two pieces of 3/4" dowel. Install the dowels in the holes.

- take a strip of plywood long enough to act as a fence, add a strip to one edge (good idea to overhang it slightly to provide clearance for sawdust) so you can attach (clamp) a stop block for repetitive cuts.

- set this fence in place approx. 90 to the track. Hold the track tight to the dowels, adjust the location of the fence to be perpendicular to the track and clamp securely to the plywood base sheet.

Now you have a home-grown cutting table with the track held at 90 to the track and can make square cuts all day long. Cost? - you probably have everything needed lying around the shop somewhere.

This was kind of the concept for my PBB - except the track would be on the EZ bridge and the fence was held in place and adjusted in the inset t-tracks
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  #22  
Old 06-05-2017, 09:56 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Tom,
I got your concept- just approached it a bit differently for this jig.

Pic one shows the table set up, ready to cut the rip direction. In the pic, tho, notice: the bolt in the table, near the closest knob; the tiny spacers on the side of the EZ track where the track abuts the bolts in the white board.

Pic two shows the track swung 90˚, ready to cut a square end. To accomplish this, the end of the white piece is pivoted upwards. When it is in this position, the track now abuts the lower bolt (near the black knob) and the bolt in the relocated white board. If you need to revert back to the rip position, merely pivot the white board back into it's original position.

Pics 3 & 4 show the mods to the underside to allow the white board to pivot; the limiters it will hit to ensure it stops in the 'home' position, and at the 90˚ position; and also an option to fine-tune it for 90˚ if it is off a fraction. (ie The bolt in the side of the limiter piece.) The spring clamp is there as a 'back-up' retainer to make sure the white board doesn't move once it's in the desired position.

Pic 5 is a close-up of the spacers- they're used when cutting in the rip position. To use, set the track in place and then set the sliding stops for what you want your final cut to be. Then, when you set your material in place, set the spacers against the bolts for the first cut. What you've done is automatically cut your piece the spacer-width larger than your finished piece will be, but, you've straight-line ripped it. Then, flip the piece so this straight-cut edge is now against the stops; set the actual track against the bolts (w/the spacers not being used); make the final cut. Your piece is cut to width, having only had to set-up for the final cut.

This works great when you need to straight-line rip one edge in order to get a usable reference edge to use in cutting the opposite edge, and don't want to do multiple set-ups to accomplish it.

Rick
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  #23  
Old 06-06-2017, 09:16 AM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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I like it, very ingenious. I see how it works, except for the cross-cutting part - or do the two slotted parts act as fence to hold the material square to the track? If that's the case, what do you do for parts that aren't long enough to reach the second slotted piece?

I've never built the PBB. It was moving up to the top of the list when my wife got sick and I kind of ran out of free time but still needed to keep working on projects. I still have the table saw - got rid of the radial arm a while back - so work is accomplished using the UEG and Cabinet Maker to break down plywood to finished size (or close to and finish up on the TS). The PBB was sized to fit in the space left by the RAS - no extra space in the shop - but I'd wind up having to put it on casters and move it for cutting larger panels so I've been setting up the cutting grid where the m/c usually sits and working off that to cut up parts.
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  #24  
Old 06-06-2017, 09:39 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
I like it, very ingenious. I see how it works, except for the cross-cutting part - or do the two slotted parts act as fence to hold the material square to the track? If that's the case, what do you do for parts that aren't long enough to reach the second slotted piece?
yes, two slotted pieces act as fence. For short parts, one could set a narrow, straight-edge across them to become a solid fence.

In my mind, I've got a # of variations of this cutting table designed, but probably won't get to them- too many other pots boiling on the stove......

As you mentioned in an earlier post, I mainly presented this as an option for those who don't have an EZ-1 or a PBB, but still want to achieve quick, accurate, repeatable cuts. If I were doing lots of cabinets, I would probably tweek this to specifically focus on doing the size of cabinet panels required for my job; should have thought about that before redoing all of the cabinets in my house already...
r
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  #25  
Old 06-06-2017, 11:09 AM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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I continue to be impressed by your innovative ideas in this area.

Having the TS, most of my effort has been towards developing a method for cross-cutting panels to length which is not best done on the TS (unless one has the money for a sliding table version). I've done a lot of looking on YouTube, and am coming to the conclusion that the best answer for me would be some type of top using the ParfDog type of locators - I've contacted a local CNC shop for a quote on an MDF slab with a dog hole pattern that would let me establish perpendiculars with the dogs and tracks. Having just the slab would let me lean it up against the TS at the end of the day and not use up any significant floor space. Another option might be the folding EZ table, but I still struggle with the methodology - EZ might consider a couple of "beginner type" videos that show the basics of using the table for the common operations.
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  #26  
Old 06-06-2017, 11:42 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
I continue to be impressed by your innovative ideas in this area.

Having the TS, most of my effort has been towards developing a method for cross-cutting panels to length which is not best done on the TS (unless one has the money for a sliding table version). I've done a lot of looking on YouTube, and am coming to the conclusion that the best answer for me would be some type of top using the ParfDog type of locators - I've contacted a local CNC shop for a quote on an MDF slab with a dog hole pattern that would let me establish perpendiculars with the dogs and tracks. Having just the slab would let me lean it up against the TS at the end of the day and not use up any significant floor space. Another option might be the folding EZ table, but I still struggle with the methodology - EZ might consider a couple of "beginner type" videos that show the basics of using the table for the common operations.
Tom,
would something like this work for doing crosscuts: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vxxeam3txc...-%205.MOV?dl=0

You wouldn't need to design it to cut miters, necessarily, but could make the support to always cut 90˚. As the video shows, mounting a short piece of track on a rigid support allows the track to not need the rear support. Having seen evidence of your 'figure-it-out' ability, I'm guessing you could come up with something stellar. Pics, please......
Rick
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  #27  
Old 06-06-2017, 12:44 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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This seems like a pretty cool setup for making your own table top. Developed by the same guy who did the Parf dogs. It's about $180 from Lee Valley but then you can make all the tops you want.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWcXSr0GgsQ

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
I continue to be impressed by your innovative ideas in this area.

Having the TS, most of my effort has been towards developing a method for cross-cutting panels to length which is not best done on the TS (unless one has the money for a sliding table version). I've done a lot of looking on YouTube, and am coming to the conclusion that the best answer for me would be some type of top using the ParfDog type of locators - I've contacted a local CNC shop for a quote on an MDF slab with a dog hole pattern that would let me establish perpendiculars with the dogs and tracks. Having just the slab would let me lean it up against the TS at the end of the day and not use up any significant floor space. Another option might be the folding EZ table, but I still struggle with the methodology - EZ might consider a couple of "beginner type" videos that show the basics of using the table for the common operations.
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  #28  
Old 06-06-2017, 01:27 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Tom,
would something like this work for doing crosscuts: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vxxeam3txc...-%205.MOV?dl=0

You wouldn't need to design it to cut miters, necessarily, but could make the support to always cut 90˚. As the video shows, mounting a short piece of track on a rigid support allows the track to not need the rear support. Having seen evidence of your 'figure-it-out' ability, I'm guessing you could come up with something stellar. Pics, please......
Rick
Rick,

That's quite an interesting concept - a little limited in cross-cut capacity though, I think I can cut that much on the sled on my TS.

For the present, I'm thinking the slab with Parf Dogs, sitting on top of my cutting grid is going to meet my needs - at least until I get some of the current projects finished and have time to make "stuff" for my shop. Even though I bought a Bridge from EZ in anticipation of making the PBB - and also using it with the SSRK, I can get by with the slab. And the same setup will work with the SSRK, just have to clamp the track when routing. I may wind up with a hybrid - the slab top with dog holes sitting in a frame, and some SME front and back so I can use the Bridge with the SSRK.
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  #29  
Old 06-06-2017, 01:31 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
This seems like a pretty cool setup for making your own table top. Developed by the same guy who did the Parf dogs. It's about $180 from Lee Valley but then you can make all the tops you want.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWcXSr0GgsQ
Yes, I've looked at that carefully - and I'm sure that it would be great if you needed a lot of tops. However, I've read posts where a CNC shop has made the slab top with the dog hole pattern for less than $100 - including the material. If you were planning on a lot of tops, or had friends that you could make them for, I'm sure that it would be a worthwhile investment.
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  #30  
Old 06-06-2017, 02:39 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Another obvious consideration when considering something like a parf dog or some other pin that the off side of your track pushes up against is that sidewinder CS's overhang the side of the track and might bump into the pin. Not a problem for euro plunge saws and tracks.
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