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  #1  
Old 04-09-2017, 07:05 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 283
Default Cabinet Carcass Back Rabbet

I was watching an online video of someone making a cabinet out of 3/4" plywood. Here is its URL:

https://www.facebook.com/Rockler/vid...5172472702378/

He assembled the sides, top, and bottom using glue and countersunk screws driven from the outside (countersunk holes filled with wood filler later). Just butt joints - nothing fancy

Next was time to add a back.

Instead of cutting the rabbets before assembly, he used a router to cut a rabbet all around the back edges. Of course that left rounded edges in the rabbet at the corners.

I expected him to somehow cut the rabbet corners square, but instead he rounded off the corners of the 1/2" plywood he used as the back. I'd never seen that.

In the commentary he said that he didn't pre-cut rabbets before assembling because rabbets cut across the panels would show from the outside - makes sense. He also said that it was a difficult cut - that he kept his arms straight. Not sure what kind of bit he was using.

Of course using the stops on the SSRK, you could create "blind rabbets" (is that a real term?), but I can see that the post-assembly routing might be faster.

How did he figure out the exact radius (or whatever shape it is) to make the back fit nicely??

I'm curious what the cabinet makers here do. How do you prep the cabinet carcass for the cabinet back?

Thanks! -- Ken
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  #2  
Old 04-09-2017, 08:40 PM
philb philb is offline
 
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Default More than one way

There are several ways to make a cabinet back. If I am not going to have the back side exposed to people I use single strip ply cut to 3/4"X4" running along the top back side and a nailer or two running the same for fastening to the wall. Upper cabinets are where I have made the full back.

I switched to the Sommerfeld Cabinet method about three years ago. Love it and it is easier to do. More costly if you use their tooling but I have yet to make a cabinet or dresser that was out of square, or sub standard. Uses more glue but the product is sound.

this is a set of plans for a kitchen. http://sommerfeldtools.com/woodworki.../cabinet-plans
http://sommerfeldtools.com/woodworki...king-made-easy

They have a YouTube channel and it is the same video in four parts. You can see what Sommerfeld tools do and what it takes.
Just an idea and I do not make cabinets every day so I need all the help I can get. I do need lots of help!
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  #3  
Old 04-09-2017, 11:46 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Posts: 250
Default

I've done that before on smaller cabinets using a rabbeting bit, the trick is to clamp a support for the router to the outside of the cabinet - I use a piece of 2x4 that's been jointed to have adjacent square edges - and do the sides in order working around the cabinet. As far as the back, it's just a matter of using a corner radius template to suit the diameter of the rabbet bit - 5/8" in my case to suit the 1-1/4" diameter cutter. I've used that method for years to make quick doors for shop and utility cabinets.
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  #4  
Old 04-10-2017, 01:14 AM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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Maybe my approach is too simplistic. When a cabinet requires a full back, I usually just cut the back as an inset; no rabbet, no routing. I'll either glue and nail, if painting; or pocket screw the back, if staining. If the back will show, I use either veneer or door panels.

I've looked long and hard at Sommerfelds method. It sounds to me exactly as philb describes. Sommerfeld is a good teacher. One thing he doesn't emphasize is the need for quality plywood. Ever tried cutting a tongue in the cheap stuff? Another thing is to be careful with the glue because it won't take stain. In fact, I learned the hard way to stain my panels before assembly to avoid glue/stain problems. Anyway, what's​ kept me from using his system is the learning curve. If get a chance, I'd like to try it.
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  #5  
Old 01-01-2018, 06:37 AM
Gilad Gilad is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 1
Default Plywood for doors?

He used plywood for long doors. Will they not twist with time?
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  #6  
Old 01-01-2018, 03:54 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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Quality plywood (usually US or European) specifically intended for cabinetry will remain stable. I've seen cabinets from the'50's made from it with no more movement than solid wood

Of course, built and hung properly, most cabinets will last decades barring climate issues, insects and critters, shifting foundation,bad plumbing, playful toddlers, angry teenagers, etc.
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  #7  
Old 01-01-2018, 03:55 PM
Dino Dino is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilad View Post
He used plywood for long doors. Will they not twist with time?
Yes, They will.
I made the same mistake using 5/8" edged glued maple.
Now I will redo them all using 3/4" ply with stiffeners inside.
Like a large x using 1x2" solid Oak strips. Strange looking but is mine and I like it easy. This is a summer project if I can make it.....

tx
d
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  #8  
Old 01-02-2018, 07:20 AM
Dino Dino is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
I was watching an online video of someone making a cabinet out of 3/4" plywood. Here is its URL:

https://www.facebook.com/Rockler/vid...5172472702378/


I'm curious what the cabinet makers here do. How do you prep the cabinet carcass for the cabinet back?

Thanks! -- Ken
Kenk,
I only made 32mm cabinets..for few reasons.
Most important was the full overlap ( Better look )
and much easier to clean. No frames and hidden areas.

I ordered the plywood pre-finished but if not available I use a flat pad. 3-4 coats before cutting the parts. ( water-acrylic)

with a simple guide ( home-made) I did all dados. ( before cutting the parts)
I kept the sides of each cabinet as a pair and from each cut I had 4 wall sides.
,
For the bottom cab's I did the same but instead 34-1/2" I cut them 31"
That saved me the toe-kick and the work to cut it)
Now I had 3 base sides instead of 2.

The best part of my system was the leveling grid on the floor.
using 1x4's I started from the highest point and screwed the 1x4's #2 pine
all around the perimeter. On the end cabinets I stayed 3-1/2" from the end.
That give me a better look with all around recces toekick. ( custom look)

Doors was delivered ( finished) by door companies and life was easy.
I made the drawers ( dado) and all the rest...
Making cabinets is plenty of work and money for all.
If you try to do everything...at the end you lose money and time.
Imagine a $60K custom Cherry cabinet job been made in a garage?
3 guys-3 days was my start to 90 % finish. But we spend 2 more days for the details.
If the customer notice one small mistake...believe me...they will look for mistakes years after you are done.

happy new year
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Last edited by Dino; 01-02-2018 at 07:30 AM.
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  #9  
Old 01-02-2018, 04:42 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 225
Thumbs down

+1 on removing the toe kick from the carcasses and building a leveling grid to set the cabinets on. Saves a lot of time and frustration, especially during installation on bigger jobs and in old houses where nothing is level or square.

Dino is also right about outsourcing doors. It's faster and time is money and the options for finished doors are amazing. But the ordering process can be confusing with some manufacturers.

Aside from finishing the job and getting paid, creating nice raised panels and tongue and groove frames is very satisfying to me. Since I work alone, have the tools for it, and usually only do smaller jobs, it pays okay to do my own. If I took on a $60k job like Dino mentioned, I'd do it like he said, no doubt.

With cabinet carcasses, and most construction, speed is the key to making money. I'm too old and broken down to be fast. In fact, some would say I'm half fast. So, I focus on smaller jobs and higher end repair and restoration - the stuff that big shops can't do. I charge a premium but it's still less than the big shops would have to charge. Where a big shop might need
$500 just to show up, I can usually finish the job in a day for about that or a little more.

That's where the EZ system has been so useful. I can do quality and precision work safely on site. I can set up quickly and easily with solid tools that don't weigh a ton. And it didn't break the bank to get into it.

I've reached a point where I need to make a major upgrade so I'm closely watching for the coming changes at EZ, especially at the overall integration of the system for different tasks: sawing, routing, work holding, assembly, dust collection, and, of course, portability.
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