The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > How-To

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11  
Old 06-08-2017, 01:13 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
If that were my house, the first thing my wife would want to move up there would be the king sized bed.
ROFL..... I feel your pain, Bro.... I feel your pain.... lol
(Methinks it is genetic to the fairer sex... no? )
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-08-2017, 02:08 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 267
Default

Perhaps it is. But that's why we don't have a spiral staircase
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-30-2017, 09:03 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 894
Default

As requested, here is an update on my spiral stair build.

Finally got all of the steps installed, including the first step at the bottom, the spiral steps, two steps at the top, and, the final landing. I had a number of conflicting parameters I had to work around in order to get this thing in the right place, w/steps where they are supposed to be; w/this type of stair, it's got to be right.

As mentioned in the first post of this thread, I used the EZ track as my 'helper' for all treads to hold the outer edge- absolutely made it work!

I am currently looking for someone in my area to bend a handrail for it. Next step is to weld in the pickets that tie adjacent steps together and will serve as the main supports for the curved handrail. Then, it's time to finish priming, and paint it. Once it's painted, I'll install the white oak treads I am making- update on those, soon.
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3496.jpg
Views:	42
Size:	88.6 KB
ID:	7157  
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-30-2017, 09:10 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 894
Default

I decided to do the treads for the spiral stair out of white oak. So, after a 1/2 day trip into the 'big city', and spending lots of money, I overloaded my little puddle-jumper truck with a bunch of rough-sawn white oak (4/4 & 5/4) and limped home. Once I got unloaded, it was time to get organized and get to work.

Doing taper cutting on the EZ One is a breeze. The 'hardest' part is the set-up, but using info from this site- http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ch...ts-d_1870.html, even figuring the set-up was EZ.

First step was to joint the face of all of the tread pieces, then plane them down to ~1 1/4" thick; final thickness would be 1". So, after the jointing/planing, I had a stack of wood, random widths, all of them 1 1/4" thick, and both edges very rough. Normally, I'd stand at the jointer and joint the edges till I had them clean, straight, and square to the face of the board. In this instance, tho, since I would be doing a bit more planing and jointing later, I opted to straight-line rip the boards on the EZ-1- much quicker, and precise enough for this step.

Pic one shows a planed board under the EZ-1 track, ready to be straight-line ripped. I would place a board under the track, position it where I wanted it to be in relation to the indexer on top of the track, and butt a couple of stops against the backside of the board to keep it from drifting while cutting. Make the cut and I have a board w/one straight edge.

Pic two shows the straight-lined edge against a fence, which is held in place by a couple of stops on the right, and has a stop at the far end of the board. Getting this angle set-up correct is crucial; using the aforementioned website was super helpful. After making the first cut, I'd put the cut-off-piece under the track in the 'to-be-cut' position and cut it. Now, out of one board, I have two fan-shaped pieces; each tread needs four of these fan-shaped pieces.

(One area where the EZ-1 shines is in being able to do the straight-line cut and then quickly slide the piece over to do the angle cut- both operations could be done w/out having to undo one set-up to do either one of the cuts. Nice. And fast. Totally precise.)

After cutting the fan shaped pieces (radians), they need to be re-jointed and re-planed. As lumber is cut, it usually relieves internal tension and moves (cup/bow/twist/etc)- this white oak didn't move much during the radian cutting, but it did move a bit. So, after the radians were cut, they were face jointed and planed, bring them to the required 1" thickness. Then, each angled side will be jointed just enough to remove any bow- I want these edges to be tight!! (Pic 3 shows a stack of radians, jointed/planed to 1", awaiting edge-jointing before assembly.)

Pic four shows the 'brains' of this whole tread-making project: the ply in the foreground is the template of the finished tread. On that plywood, I've done the math and lay-out for each radian of the tread. Behind the template are four radians that will overlay the template. The procedure, after cutting the radians, is to place four of the radians in the designated slots on the template. By sliding a radian towards the narrow end, the entire tread grows in width; by sliding towards the 'fat' end, the tread shrinks in width. The goal is to align the radians so that when they are glued together, they will overhang the template by no more than 1/16" on both sides; the ends will run 'wild', but will be trimmed with a jigsaw to the same 1/16" overhang. Once a glued-up tread has been trimmed to the prerequisite 1/16" overhang, it is clamped to the template and a pattern-routing bit is run around the edge, cutting it to the exact shape of the template.

The most tedious part of this whole project is prepping to glue up the radians to make a tread: I'm using 3/8" dowels to align @ piece, and it takes forever to drill for those dowels...... sigh......

But, the end result is worth it! Pic 5 shows one completed tread, stained. Looks beautiful (at least, Mamacita thinks so....) and fits exact-o!

I am having a blast building these, and EZ is a big part of that.
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3492.jpg
Views:	47
Size:	104.1 KB
ID:	7158   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3493.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	103.7 KB
ID:	7159   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3497.jpg
Views:	47
Size:	107.1 KB
ID:	7160   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3494.jpg
Views:	44
Size:	99.7 KB
ID:	7161   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3495.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	103.1 KB
ID:	7162  

Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-30-2017, 09:38 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,226
Default

Very cool. That looks like fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
I decided to do the treads for the spiral stair out of white oak. So, after a 1/2 day trip into the 'big city', and spending lots of money, I overloaded my little puddle-jumper truck with a bunch of rough-sawn white oak (4/4 & 5/4) and limped home. Once I got unloaded, it was time to get organized and get to work.

Doing taper cutting on the EZ One is a breeze. The 'hardest' part is the set-up, but using info from this site- http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ch...ts-d_1870.html, even figuring the set-up was EZ.

First step was to joint the face of all of the tread pieces, then plane them down to ~1 1/4" thick; final thickness would be 1". So, after the jointing/planing, I had a stack of wood, random widths, all of them 1 1/4" thick, and both edges very rough. Normally, I'd stand at the jointer and joint the edges till I had them clean, straight, and square to the face of the board. In this instance, tho, since I would be doing a bit more planing and jointing later, I opted to straight-line rip the boards on the EZ-1- much quicker, and precise enough for this step.

Pic one shows a planed board under the EZ-1 track, ready to be straight-line ripped. I would place a board under the track, position it where I wanted it to be in relation to the indexer on top of the track, and butt a couple of stops against the backside of the board to keep it from drifting while cutting. Make the cut and I have a board w/one straight edge.

Pic two shows the straight-lined edge against a fence, which is held in place by a couple of stops on the right, and has a stop at the far end of the board. Getting this angle set-up correct is crucial; using the aforementioned website was super helpful. After making the first cut, I'd put the cut-off-piece under the track in the 'to-be-cut' position and cut it. Now, out of one board, I have two fan-shaped pieces; each tread needs four of these fan-shaped pieces.

(One area where the EZ-1 shines is in being able to do the straight-line cut and then quickly slide the piece over to do the angle cut- both operations could be done w/out having to undo one set-up to do either one of the cuts. Nice. And fast. Totally precise.)

After cutting the fan shaped pieces (radians), they need to be re-jointed and re-planed. As lumber is cut, it usually relieves internal tension and moves (cup/bow/twist/etc)- this white oak didn't move much during the radian cutting, but it did move a bit. So, after the radians were cut, they were face jointed and planed, bring them to the required 1" thickness. Then, each angled side will be jointed just enough to remove any bow- I want these edges to be tight!! (Pic 3 shows a stack of radians, jointed/planed to 1", awaiting edge-jointing before assembly.)

Pic four shows the 'brains' of this whole tread-making project: the ply in the foreground is the template of the finished tread. On that plywood, I've done the math and lay-out for each radian of the tread. Behind the template are four radians that will overlay the template. The procedure, after cutting the radians, is to place four of the radians in the designated slots on the template. By sliding a radian towards the narrow end, the entire tread grows in width; by sliding towards the 'fat' end, the tread shrinks in width. The goal is to align the radians so that when they are glued together, they will overhang the template by no more than 1/16" on both sides; the ends will run 'wild', but will be trimmed with a jigsaw to the same 1/16" overhang. Once a glued-up tread has been trimmed to the prerequisite 1/16" overhang, it is clamped to the template and a pattern-routing bit is run around the edge, cutting it to the exact shape of the template.

The most tedious part of this whole project is prepping to glue up the radians to make a tread: I'm using 3/8" dowels to align @ piece, and it takes forever to drill for those dowels...... sigh......

But, the end result is worth it! Pic 5 shows one completed tread, stained. Looks beautiful (at least, Mamacita thinks so....) and fits exact-o!

I am having a blast building these, and EZ is a big part of that.
Rick
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-30-2017, 10:52 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Evans, GA
Posts: 1,586
Default

Fantastic Rick. Good thing I don't have any place to put one of those...
__________________
Have fun...

Dik Harrison
Former Consultant to EurekaZone

Blog
YouTube
SketchUp Models
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 01:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.