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Old 07-23-2017, 09:27 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lexington, Ky
Posts: 900
Default straight is good.....

Couple of EZ-solution projects recently.

First one had to do with cleaning up an existing tile edge so I could make a threshold to cover the edge of the tile. (Yes, not my choice of tile color either- it came with the house and I haven't gotten to it to change it out yet.....)

In the pics, you can see how the EZ track helped me cut a straight line. I attached the track as shown in pic one. After lining up the track to the cut-line, I made shallow passes with the saw, using two vacs to keep the dust down. (fwiw: the dust collection on the Hilti in the pic is phenomenal!) When I reached the limits of the saw, I finished it off using a hand-held grinder.

Came out very nice!

Second job has to do with straightening twisted beams. Pic three shows an example of the twist.

These are too cumbersome to feed thru the jointer, so I resorted to the typical method of flattening large pieces of lumber: set up parallel guide ridges on either side of the piece to be flattened and make passes with the router riding on the ridges until the piece being worked on is flat.

I was looking for something I could set up quickly; move from end-to-end since the pieces are longer than my track; maintain consistent results; adapt for different heights of wood; etc.

What I came up with works superbly! Pics four and five show the set-up.

The edges of the tracks are my guide ridges. They sit on the top of my PBB and are held in place as shown in the pics. I made a modified base for my router to make sure the router bit doesn't hit either aluminum track. Once the board to be flattened is positioned against the track/ridge nearest the edge of the PBB, it is shimmed and screwed from underneath to keep it from moving while routing. The second track/ridge is then snugged up against the back side of the wood and held in place by bolts into T-nuts in the PBB top, holding the angle braces. This second track/ridge is not held in place by anything else- it doesn't slide or move during use.

After routing the extent of the usable tracks/ridges, they are slid down to either end. After routing that end, I repeat the process on the other end. I'll do one side, then an adjacent side, and then send them thru the planer. Again, a great EZ solution!
Rick
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  #2  
Old 07-24-2017, 12:05 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,245
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I've done a similar thing to get a flat face on a twisted beam. Except I made a 3 sided box, bottom and 2 sides out of ply that the beam set in. Then put a ply base on my router so it would ride on the edges of my ply box. Put a couple of cleats on the bottom of the ply base so the cutter wouldn't reach the sides of my ply box and then just started pushing the router around. Worked amazingly well. The idea wasn't original, I saw something like it on the cover of a wood working magazine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Couple of EZ-solution projects recently.

First one had to do with cleaning up an existing tile edge so I could make a threshold to cover the edge of the tile. (Yes, not my choice of tile color either- it came with the house and I haven't gotten to it to change it out yet.....)

In the pics, you can see how the EZ track helped me cut a straight line. I attached the track as shown in pic one. After lining up the track to the cut-line, I made shallow passes with the saw, using two vacs to keep the dust down. (fwiw: the dust collection on the Hilti in the pic is phenomenal!) When I reached the limits of the saw, I finished it off using a hand-held grinder.

Came out very nice!

Second job has to do with straightening twisted beams. Pic three shows an example of the twist.

These are too cumbersome to feed thru the jointer, so I resorted to the typical method of flattening large pieces of lumber: set up parallel guide ridges on either side of the piece to be flattened and make passes with the router riding on the ridges until the piece being worked on is flat.

I was looking for something I could set up quickly; move from end-to-end since the pieces are longer than my track; maintain consistent results; adapt for different heights of wood; etc.

What I came up with works superbly! Pics four and five show the set-up.

The edges of the tracks are my guide ridges. They sit on the top of my PBB and are held in place as shown in the pics. I made a modified base for my router to make sure the router bit doesn't hit either aluminum track. Once the board to be flattened is positioned against the track/ridge nearest the edge of the PBB, it is shimmed and screwed from underneath to keep it from moving while routing. The second track/ridge is then snugged up against the back side of the wood and held in place by bolts into T-nuts in the PBB top, holding the angle braces. This second track/ridge is not held in place by anything else- it doesn't slide or move during use.

After routing the extent of the usable tracks/ridges, they are slid down to either end. After routing that end, I repeat the process on the other end. I'll do one side, then an adjacent side, and then send them thru the planer. Again, a great EZ solution!
Rick
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  #3  
Old 07-24-2017, 02:37 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lexington, Ky
Posts: 900
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I've done a similar thing to get a flat face on a twisted beam. Except I made a 3 sided box, bottom and 2 sides out of ply that the beam set in. Then put a ply base on my router so it would ride on the edges of my ply box. Put a couple of cleats on the bottom of the ply base so the cutter wouldn't reach the sides of my ply box and then just started pushing the router around. Worked amazingly well. The idea wasn't original, I saw something like it on the cover of a wood working magazine.
Exactly, Sean; the concept isn't novel or new. What I was enthusing about was how easily/quickly the EZ track enabled me to create that 'box', as well as how the 'box' could "grow/shrink" to meet the demands of longer/shorter material. Add into that the non-need to cut up plywood to make the 'box' and the rapid assembly/disassembly time.

It's working great; 2 beams down, two more to go.
Rick
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