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  #1  
Old 10-09-2017, 03:09 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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Default Because we've always done it this way...

Ever hear the story of the young woman who asked her mother why she cut the end off the end of the roast before baking? Her mother answered, "Because your grandmother always did it that way." So, they ask Grandma who says "My oven was too small for a full size roast."

Anyway, I like to keep up with new innovative tools and such. So, recently I spent a little time watching presentations of the merits of a certain brand of push blocks, tapering jigs, dado jigs, sleds and a couple more on the merits of a sliding table saw.

As I watched I thought of the expenses: $4k for a cabinet saw, $300 for jigs, $300 for a sled, and $7k+ for a sliding table saw.

Frankly, it's a little like trying to make Guttenburg's press more user friendly.

Every cut those jigs are designed to make can be done with less fuss and more safety on the EZ1. And the EZ1 costs less and is portable.

That's my rant for the day.
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  #2  
Old 10-09-2017, 07:21 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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I would LOOOOVE to see a video that shows a series of typical cuts first on a live wood machine, such as a table saw - necessary jigs included, or a router table ...

(I'm thinking about rip cuts, cross cuts, miter cuts, bevel cuts, dados, grooves, rabbets, ... basic stuff .... not sure what non-basic stuff would be useful)

... and then do the same cuts using the EZ Smart tools using rails and/or EZ-One (such as rips using the EZSmart Clamp System, the UEG, and the EZ-One), and the Super Smart Router Kit (SSRK).

It should include short descriptions of the basic setup process for each - to be complete, such as setting stops or measuring for the cuts.

I'm not talking about the super-user stuff that Rick and others do with home-made jigs. That is impressive, but I'm picturing a more basic user skill level.

I've been reading about how video bloggers take the videos using somewhat high end video capable digital SLR's - with remote sound capability. Got some sticker shock when I saw the price for that kind of gear.

Ken K.
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  #3  
Old 10-10-2017, 12:08 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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I've had the same thoughts about the videos. A side by side demonstration would be very effective.

The purpose would not be to intentionally denigrate the table saw. Many have done and continue to do amazing things with them but their time is passing. Like most antiquated technology, they are bulky, heavy, expensive, and dangerous.

As expected, the future is safer, faster, lighter, and less costly, especially for the small shop, on site contractor, one-man operator, and the DIY'er. And I'm not talking about a CNC! Well, not yet, anyway.
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  #4  
Old 10-11-2017, 07:06 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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I don't mean any disrespect but I'm not sure how you figure that the TS's time is passing. Sure tracksaws can do some things a TS can do but there are other things a TS does better. If all you're cutting are panels a tracksaw is great. The portability is great. But I can't cut 4" stock with a tracksaw, I can't set a bevel accurately to 1 degree and make the cut faster than I can write this with a tracksaw. In another thread the OP asked about cutting an 8ft 1x4 into 1" strips. With my TS I'd be set up and done faster than I can write this. Sure I could cut that with EZ but it'd be impractical.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
I've had the same thoughts about the videos. A side by side demonstration would be very effective.

The purpose would not be to intentionally denigrate the table saw. Many have done and continue to do amazing things with them but their time is passing. Like most antiquated technology, they are bulky, heavy, expensive, and dangerous.

As expected, the future is safer, faster, lighter, and less costly, especially for the small shop, on site contractor, one-man operator, and the DIY'er. And I'm not talking about a CNC! Well, not yet, anyway.
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  #5  
Old 10-11-2017, 08:55 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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i don't foresee tablesaws going anywhere until CNC is portable, easily expandable in capacity, affordable, and mainstream enough to end up in big box stores and hobbyist homes. Even then, the tablesaw will be around for specialty cuts.

it's like having a miter saw for chopping up dimensional lumber or boards. Sure, a tablesaw or tracksaw can do it, but it's so much quicker and easier to just throw it on the miter, line it up, pull the trigger, and cut.
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  #6  
Old 10-12-2017, 06:00 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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I'm certainly not "anti table saw". My brother uses one all the time - its his most important woodworking tool, for sure. But my own choice is not to buy a table saw (OK, I have a really old cheap Skil table saw that I've not used for maybe 25 years), and I choose not to use one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I can't cut 4" stock with a tracksaw
Can most table saws cut 4" stock? I honestly don't know, but I thought the cut was typically shallower than that.

It seems that it would be doable using the EZ Smart guide rail - but may not be as fast - to do the cut from two sides IF you're using one of the larger circular saws. I know my saws' depths of cut will not do that on the rail, but that is the ONLY way I will use them - I will not run circular saws off-rail - other than using the UEG - and even that makes me a bit nervouse

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I can't set a bevel accurately to 1 degree and make the cut faster than I can write this with a tracksaw
The guide rails can be used to cut a bevel - most people remove the anti-chip edge and base when doing that, though I myself have not done bevel cuts. I've seen where they do them on the "other" side of the EZ-One guide rail, sacrificing that area of the squaring and sliding rails to these cuts.

I suspect the 1 degree accuracy is only limited by the accuracy of the circular saw's markings and the ability of the user to set the circular saw's bevel to the desired angle as measured by whatever device (which in itself might be a limitation). Again, I have not yet had to make bevel cuts on my EZ-One.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
In another thread the OP asked about cutting an 8ft 1x4 into 1" strips. With my TS I'd be set up and done faster than I can write this. Sure I could cut that with EZ but it'd be impractical.
Yeah, RED's request to be able to cut 8'x1"x1" strips left me noodling the limitations of the EZ Smart tools, but in the end remember that he apparently was badly injured by table saw kickback, so may be very willing to trade speed for safety. That is exactly how I came to use EZ Smart products.

I have to admit that I watch Youtube videos of people who prefer to do most, if not all, the wood cutting by hand. I'm impressed with what they can do, but I can't see me having those kind of skills.

Ken K.

Last edited by kenk; 10-12-2017 at 06:03 PM.
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  #7  
Old 10-12-2017, 10:49 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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No offense taken!
I think the TS will always be around but only for commercial, industrial, and specialty applications. They'll be like sawmills and trains.

Even manufacturers know it. Job site saws are the best selling type of TS on the market because most don't need a 500 lb. cabinet saw any more than they need a Ford F-450 as a daily driver. But as long as enough guys are willing to buy one, I'm sure they'll keep making them.

However, as people become more informed about the expenses, dangers, and liabilities associated with the TS, they are turning to newer, simpler, safer approaches, which is why track saws and plunge saws are so wildly popular. It's telling when pros are willing to drop $1000+ on a track saw system like the EZ1 or Festool MFT when they could get a decent job site TS for half the price.

Carpentry and woodworking is my livelihood, face frame cabinetry, decks, furniture, and more. I haven't used a table saw on a paying job since I went with EZ. I've drooled at the Sawstop PCS but there's just no need. I may use the TS to build an entry door for my in-laws... or not.
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