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  #11  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:08 AM
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Default Brian Kincaid

Wow that's some great information. It's so cool to get great information from both users and the inventor. This will help me make a decision in the future.

Brian
  #12  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:09 AM
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Default Gabe Olsen

If you want to spend more money by the festool, Makita, Dewalt. You will have a better system with the EZ rails and the Makita 5008mga. Have not seen the Festool but have seen the Makita, Dewalt. The rails don't come close to the EZ. The plunge saw seems awkward to use. The primary advantage to these seems to be the beveling system.

Dino, I would love to see this system on the shelf at the local building supply yards.....
  #13  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:10 AM
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Default Dino Makropoulos

Gabe,
The Plunge saws was designed for flooring applications.
I think, not 100% sure, before the panel technology was invented.
They can cut very close to the walls ( 1/2") and the baseboard covers the space. A real time saver for the flooring guys.
But not without the usual problems ( Plunge saws only ) of the saws jumbing of the rails if you hit a nail, step on the cord, not enough pressure applied, trying to cut far with one hand, and few other cases.

When the panels ( Plywood ) come to the market it was good to use the rail and saw to cut them into smaller pieces.

Today's circular saws are very strong, accurate and reliable.
With the right base ( smart base ) you have the power, guidance and the best anti chip protection as well as ergonomics and ease of use.
The best thing about the ez system is that you can use your saw on and off the rails without splintering and without special blades.

The beveling system is better on the plunge saws but again, not without the usual problems. I have no idea how you can have accurate bevel cuts with the saw sliding on flexible guide rails.
The beveling is something that we're working and we hope to have it solved in few days.
If someone needs to do many bevel cuts ( production) the ez system offers few ways for truly accurate and safe bevel cuts.
One thing to keep in mind is that we're making " One of a kind" systems for special applications. The latest ez-custom system was delivered few days ago. The price tag was $7.500.00 and the daily savings for the buyer are $1.500.00

Enjoy the weekend.
  #14  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:11 AM
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Default Gabe Olsen

Ok Dino,
So I am not a flooring guy so cutting close to the wall is not important to me as well as about 99.9% of saw users out there. If I need to cut close to the wall a Fein tool or a Sawzall will get much closer than 1/2". A jamb saw would also do that. Also about 99.9% of circular saw jobs don't require "plunging". I wouldn't use rails for plunge cuts anyway, there are better methods for stopped cuts. I don't know any flooring guys who use plunge saws. The extra money spent on them would be better spent elsewhere. I think most of the market share for plunge saws are the hobbyist not the professional.
  #15  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:11 AM
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Default Gabe Olsen

Oh yeah,
And for bevel cuts I don't think the table saw can be beat. Except for the safety issue. Sawstop anyone...
  #16  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:12 AM
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Default Dino Makropoulos

Gabe,
Having the ability to do accurate plunge cuts on the floor is very good feature for the pro's. Think about borders and inlays.
When the plunge saws first hit the US market they first targeted the right buyers. The flooring guys.
I first saw the plunge saws in Hoboken Flooring. A major flooring distributor in N. East.
  #17  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:13 AM
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Default Dino Makropoulos

For safe and accurate bevel cuts we need a very stable platform and
a base designed to keep the saw from tilting.

The Saw Stop is my favor invention but not the answer to bevel cuts.


Take a look at the photo gallery for few ideas.

http://eurekazone.com/gallery/search.php

The best one is here:
Total safety, accuracy and stability.
http://eurekazone.com/gallery/The-EZ-Worx

Here you can see the benefits of the Dead Wood Concept and the ez twins.
You can make tapered bevel cuts in small and large pieces without the usual problems.
http://eurekazone.com/gallery/The-EZ...th_ez_Worx_021
  #18  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:14 AM
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Default Gabe Olsen

Another way to stabilize your angle cuts would be to simply bolt on a 1/2" melamine plate to the outside edge. That would eliminate the second rail. I have a melamine copy of the smart base on my siding saw with a 1/2" plate on the right and it works pretty good. Set to the center of the blade and plunge in also makes a splinter guard without contacting the pvc edge.
Precision tools made from scraps!
Gabe
  #19  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:15 AM
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Default Dino Makropoulos

Not only you have anti splintering protection but total safety.
The cutoff piece is under pressure by the 1/2" shoe and there is no way to have flying bullets on narrow and short pieces.

The AC-2 was first designed for the stability and safety.
The anti splintering protection was a nice bonus.
We trim and cut many extrusions.
The 1/2" shoe is bolted on all our saws.
  #20  
Old 08-22-2009, 08:15 AM
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Default Burt Waddell

The front handle design has a huge effect on bevel cuts. A lot of the guys were talking about having problems with bevels. I was using the Hilti 267E and having no problem at all. The difference is the front handle on the Hilti is made on the base of the saw and does not tilt when the saw is set for a bevel cut. How about a third handle that could be attached to a saw when doing bevel cuts.
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