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  #1  
Old 01-10-2016, 11:35 PM
TheBabyHuey TheBabyHuey is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 8
Default My honest opinion of my EZ setup.

With about 9 months of EZSmart experience, I thought I'd post my experiences.

UEG - Easily the most "No Brainer" EZ purchase you can possibly make. The accuracy of the measuring guides on the rail always surprises me. Of course in true EZ tradition, you'll need to assemble it at least three times because the EZ boys had no clue when they wrote the assembly manual (Please show which size washer goes where without some poor soul combing through the forum for a half day). $50 = great value!

The Saw Base - Quite a slice of genius! The concept works incredibly well as long as you set it up properly. Luckily, Laney recently shot a video on this!
BTW: Don't think for a second that you'll be cutting 45 deg cuts with the second slot. "CAN" YOU? Sure...but throwing wood into a dull rusty blade on a table saw is twice as safe as trying to cut a 45 deg cut with this base on a length of track. You'll find that the saw will constantly try to tip over. (extremely dangerous!) 90 deg cuts however work great! $50 = worth it!

Track - Again, awesome design! Very stout!
But the price is way to high, but you're kind of stuck with having to buy it to really see the beauty of the basic system (and EZ knows it and priced it accordingly) BTW: Buy at least the 64" if you're going to work with much plywood. I bought the 54" because it was on sale and I regret it daily.
$23 per foot = Ouch! Yes, it works very well, but there's no reason to gouge.

EZ Smart Saw = Spend a little more money and get a better brand. The base plate is pretty darn nice, but the blade-height adjustment knob is disgustingly flimsy. The only reason it hasn't broke yet is because I "baby" this thing. There is noticeable side-to-side play in the main saw hinge as indicated by the overly wide cut slots in my saw base inserts. Also, one huge disappointment was that it's advertised as having a brake?!?!?! The blade takes a very long time to wind-down with no noticeable brake action at all.
That being said, EZ's claim that the base/track system can make a crappy saw with a crappy blade cut extremely well IS TRUE!!!! Because this IS a crappy saw with a crappy blade and the cuts are VERY nice!!!
Get something nicer that won't feel like it's going to break every time you adjust the blade height.
EZSmart Saw - $179 (EZ ready) = pretty bad value.

B300 Bridge - Pretty darn cool. Strictly a luxury. Would be a good deal at half the price. $199 = awful value.

Super Smart Routing Package (SSRK) - Simply too much hassle. Theoretically it should be awesome, but in practice it's just a gigantic pain-in-the-rear. I've spent more time with trying to make this work than any tool I've ever bought. It's made from a handful of miscellaneous extrusion bolted together with some high density plastic worth $75 max! Came with 36" of track and a couple stops, but that doesn't justify the outrageously overpriced price tag of $344 = Horrible value.

EZSmart Miter Square - I can't make it stay square and according to the forum, many others can't either.
$15 worth of SME + 3 knobs for $80 = Are they kidding?!?!?!
The handle which makes cutting your out-of-square cuts easier is worth about $25, but sells for $60.

*CONCLUSION*
In my opinion, a basic 64" EZ Smart track system (consisting of any saw except the EZ Smart one) combined with a homemade cutting table is a great value because the actual concept and results are incredibly good and very safe!!!!

But unfortunately, adding some of the most popular additional accessories VERY RAPIDLY throws the bang-for-the-buck value right out the window.
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  #2  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:05 AM
TooManyToys TooManyToys is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Jersey Shore (Not Seaside!)
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Miter Square The original, non-adjustable square was a better alternative, plus you can attach a clamp to it.

SSRK You would have preferred the SRK.

Saw Base I never tried to modify the stock base but it wasn't hard to make a base that incorporated a block on the side opposite the blade that extended to the bottom of the track with a follower dowel in the tracks side groove to stabilize the saw from tipping. Rick may have done this too.

I never understood why EZ never took a well made saw and designed a full replacement base plate as to not have such a loss of cutting depth rather then an add-on base. One of the EZ recommended saws in the past was a PorterCable mag base (I still have left and right versions) and later the Hitachi, both would have been a good choices for this. IMO, this would have made it a more marketable product with its thick track.
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  #3  
Old 01-11-2016, 06:40 PM
Chad_C Chad_C is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
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I am totally with you on the SSRK. I have wasted more time with that thing than I care to admit. It is a very awkward piece of equipment to try to use. I keep it on the shelf in case I ever come up with a brilliant idea on how to use it.

The miter square also is pretty terrible. However, there is a simple fix that makes it very usable. Basically you clamp a small speed square between the rail and the horizontal piece. Works great. There are a couple of threads that show what I mean.
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  #4  
Old 01-11-2016, 06:58 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is online now
 
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I have both the SRK and the SSRK and of the two, I prefer the versatility of the SSRK. I can swap out the track for a longer one if the situation requires, and it is much easier to set stops for the axis perpendicular to the track upon which it rides. Maybe some day when my rebuild of my shop is finished, I'll make some more videos on using the SSRK.
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  #5  
Old 01-12-2016, 01:06 AM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 229
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I have to agree with the conclusions made above, more or less. I have only done dadoes with the SSRK and it has performed well for me but the design is rough. The bridge is the one piece that sets the system apart. It's why I chose EZ over others. The guide rail is sturdy but anything less than 54" is not that useful - to me anyway.

I strongly agree that building your own table is the most cost effective way to use the system. Its the way I went and I'm very happy with my shop set up. For my portable set up, I don't like the clamps. Why not use the clamps from the clamping table? (Why didn't I think of this before?)

Anyway, if I had one wish, it would be for a simple but solid performing miter system. I've adapted an Incra guage and a Shinwa guage but that's another thread. Just let me say that if EZ can sell EZReady saws, I think they could do an EZReady Incra gauge but thats for another thread. As for miter/track systems, I recently saw a video of the new Festool HKS Miter System. Very slick, cordless, and works on 2X material but not available in the US, yet.
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  #6  
Old 01-12-2016, 12:55 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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For those who have abandoned the SSRK ... what are you using instead of the SSRK now?

How are you handling the odd thicknesses of plywood without the SSRK - where there is no straight bit of the exact width? (I think that is one place where the SSRK really shines.) Are you using stacked dado blades on a table saw?

I don't have the Miter Square, I have the older, well, Square - that only provides 90 degree angle cuts. It seems to do me very well, though so far I've only used it on cuts up to 30ish inches long. Its seems to be repeatable with mounting and unmounting of the guide rail.

Am I correct that the problem folks are having with the Miter Square is not so much getting it square in the first place, but keeping it square, correct?

If so, does it stay square through repeated cuts, but not over the long term (with storage and bumping)? Or does it loose the square over the span of just a few cuts - even if not bumped hard?
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  #7  
Old 01-12-2016, 01:46 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,259
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This is the first review I've read of the EZ Saw. Too bad EZ went in that direction.
EZ Square needs to be renamed to " A length of extrusion and a couple of connectors". It's hard to set, doesn't stay set and too much money.
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  #8  
Old 01-12-2016, 02:57 PM
Dustin B Dustin B is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
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The bridge on my Paulk bench is what's really making the system for me. But only because I also have a great fence setup for it with a very accurate measuring system that is very repeatable.

The extrusions cost what they cost. I don't think they are taking a huge profit on them. I doubt their cheap to them either. The EZ extrusions are much more substantial than any of the competitors. Cheaper than Festool and a bit more than the Makita. My biggest issue is that you can't count on the longer extrusions being straight which can cause some big problems.

I think the SSRK has substantial use. But you need to get some setup jigs figured out to speed up the setup. Without those it can be painful to get setup.

I've had no problem keeping the square square. Getting it square was a pain, but now that I have my Paulk bench and I've carefully laid out the bench dog holes just takes 2 bench dogs, butt the rail, put the square tight to the edge, tighten and I know I'm square. Use the 5 cuts method to get it really dialed in, then cut your own nice big square and keep it for setting the square up again. Will agree that given what's in it, it's pretty over priced. Pretty easy to buy the the two extrusions and make your own though if the price is the hurdle and you have time.

A UEG/Cabinet Maker/Smart Table and decent circular saw is less than the cost of a decent contractors saw and would be pretty capable. Two exceptions being setting the repeater on the cabinet maker accurately and repeatably is not easy and the current stop is nearly useless. Come up with a system to set it accurately and replace the stop with something that works and you could do a lot of things and be very portable.
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