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  #11  
Old 05-29-2017, 08:13 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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There was already someone that was working on something similar.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUpzSFHR06U

But I take it this never got produced.
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  #12  
Old 05-29-2017, 10:39 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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That was 8 years ago, I never carried it further. It could easily be adapted to fitting into the track edge slot. Here is a blog entry where I used the jig to bore holes for a friend's Christmas star.

Hmmm, I may look into buying a standalone jig to fit to the edge slot.
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  #13  
Old 05-29-2017, 10:53 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
OK, so I'm looking at the SSRK and can imagine the following two attachments that would facilitate 32 mm spacing...
...
...Does this make sense??

Ken K.
I think so.

Here are pics of something similar I did years ago.

Piece of pegboard attached to the ACE edge of EZ track; modification to the SSRK to hold an indexing arm; in this prototype, a drill bit allows for indexing. Similar concept to Dik's approach referenced in the video link above (post #11); almost exactly like Dik's set-up in his link in post #12.

Even tho this works fine, even before refinement, it is much slower than the simple hand-drill jig I bought from Woodhaven many years ago.
Rick

Last edited by bumpnstump; 05-29-2017 at 11:15 AM.
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  #14  
Old 05-29-2017, 11:14 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
Why not forego any attachments and drill holes into the guide rail itself? They're small enough to not compromise the strength of the rail. Making your own attachment might be less expensive but having one guide rail for both​ cutting and drilling/routing seems to fit with the practicality of the SSRK.

Also, took a look at my Kreg shelf pin jig. They are designed so that two or more can be locked together doubling (or more) the capacity.
I tried drilling out a piece of track for indexing a shelf drilling jig. While the concept worked- holes drilled easily in the EZ track; indexing pin in SSRK base worked flawlessly- drilling all those holes in the track changed the tension dynamics of the extruded track and caused it to bow.
Rick
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  #15  
Old 05-29-2017, 11:07 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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[QUOTE=bumpnstump;38914]I tried drilling out a piece of track for indexing a shelf drilling jig. While the concept worked- holes drilled easily in the EZ track; indexing pin in SSRK base worked flawlessly- drilling all those holes in the track changed the tension dynamics of the extruded track and caused it to bow.
Rick[/QUOTE

What length rail did you use? Would placing the indexing holes somewhere else in the rail help? What about smaller holes? The green one is 55" and fairly flexible, especially compared to an EZ rail. I don't suppose you have any pictures.

If drilling indexing holes into the rail makes it too flexible to use for anything else, it would be just another jig competing for my money and shop space which happen to be in short supply.

However, if it worked, it would still be a lot better deal than the green stuff.
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  #16  
Old 05-29-2017, 11:28 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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[QUOTE=Tracedfar;38915]
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
I tried drilling out a piece of track for indexing a shelf drilling jig. While the concept worked- holes drilled easily in the EZ track; indexing pin in SSRK base worked flawlessly- drilling all those holes in the track changed the tension dynamics of the extruded track and caused it to bow.
Rick[/QUOTE

What length rail did you use?

I think it was a 54.

Would placing the indexing holes somewhere else in the rail help?

Don't know.

What about smaller holes?

Don't know that one either.

The green one is 55" and fairly flexible, especially compared to an EZ rail. I don't suppose you have any pictures.

No, sir; no pics.

If drilling indexing holes into the rail makes it too flexible to use for anything else, it would be just another jig competing for my money and shop space which happen to be in short supply.

However, if it worked, it would still be a lot better deal than the green stuff.

If you have extra track, you could do your own experiment(s) to see what might work for you? I'd be interested to see what you come up with.
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  #17  
Old 06-08-2017, 09:03 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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I am just curious, at $112 for a 54" track, how do you get the comfort to drill it out and potentially "ruin it?"

I would like to either have the money to do so, or the blind curiosity to simply say $^%#-it and have at it... Or does one simply have access to the extrusions at a much lower cost in order to try and make new things with them?

I can understand that "in-house" the extrusions are not nearly as costly since there is profit built into what I see on the website. As well, there is an R&D aspect to a business and such expenses are budgeted. But for those just using the product and "hacking" additional solutions with it, it seems like a prohibitively expensive "raw material". As it is, I have even considered simply mounting a piece of 5/8" aluminum flat stock to a 1/2" plywood just to have secondary and tertiary tracks to experiment with.
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  #18  
Old 06-08-2017, 09:49 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
I am just curious, at $112 for a 54" track, how do you get the comfort to drill it out and potentially "ruin it?"

I would like to either have the money to do so, or the blind curiosity to simply say $^%#-it and have at it... Or does one simply have access to the extrusions at a much lower cost in order to try and make new things with them?

I can understand that "in-house" the extrusions are not nearly as costly since there is profit built into what I see on the website. As well, there is an R&D aspect to a business and such expenses are budgeted. But for those just using the product and "hacking" additional solutions with it, it seems like a prohibitively expensive "raw material". As it is, I have even considered simply mounting a piece of 5/8" aluminum flat stock to a 1/2" plywood just to have secondary and tertiary tracks to experiment with.
Can't speak for others, but here's how it happened for me:

-When I first got into EZ, I realized the potential need for additional track and other extrusions. Since I didn't have tons of $, I bided my time, keeping an eye on 'advanced-search, craigslist', now and then. Scored a couple of significant deals on EZ owners who didn't need their equip any longer.

-When Dino was the sole mover-and-shaker of EZ, he sometimes had significant %-off sales. One of those came up when I happened to have a couple of dollars in my pocket, so I bought a bit more extrusions.

Things have changed from then till now:
-I don't have the expendable income I used to have;
-%-off sales don't happen like they used to;
-There are still folks selling their extrusions on craigslist, and doing an 'advanced search' might score you some.

Today, if I were to take the same approach of 'drilling out' a piece of EZ track, I would do it similar to how you suggested:

-"Make" your own track, either w/the 5/8" alum. you mentioned, or:

-Cut a piece of 1/2" baltic birch to ~6" wide; rout a groove, 1/4" deep down the middle, the width of the EZ saw-base groove; insert a piece of the 1/2" baltic into the groove; drill appropriately to allow your pin-jig to drill your shelf-pin holes. While being precise enough for the shelf-pin jig, I would still use the EZ track for cutting and routing.
YMMV,
Rick

Last edited by bumpnstump; 06-08-2017 at 09:52 AM.
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  #19  
Old 06-08-2017, 09:54 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Time to learn to use "Advanced Search" on Craigslist I guess
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  #20  
Old 06-08-2017, 11:23 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Time to learn to use "Advanced Search" on Craigslist I guess
If you do a google search for 'advanced search craigslist', a number of options pop up- some better than others.

The way I prefer:

-Type into google search bar whatever you are looking for; in this case, try "eurekazone";

-when the hits pop up, notice the options above the hits; one of them is called 'settings'- click on this;

-under 'settings', click on 'advanced search';

-it will then open up into the page shown in the pic below, w/"eurekazone" filled in on the top slot;

-scroll down to where it says 'none of these words', and type in 'directory';

-scroll down to where it says 'site or domain' and type in 'craigslist.org';

-hit return and you'll see all of the craigslist listings for your search item across the usa.
Rick
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Last edited by bumpnstump; 06-09-2017 at 11:39 PM.
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