The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > Woodworking Philosophies

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-28-2011, 01:48 PM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 529
Default Drum Sander Question

This question is not related to EZ, but I have been wanting to get a drum sander for a while. Someone nearby has a Ryobi WDS1600 16-32 open end drum sander available on Craigslist. He is asking $250 for it and it comes with extra sanding rolls and a mobile stand. I have bought other things from the guy and a brief glance at the tool (when he had it listed for $500 -- and could definitely not afford that) showed it to be in decent shape (though very dusty). I know he is really wanting to unload this sander due to having moved and his health causing him to sell off much of his equipment.

Does anyone have experience with this sander? I know Ryobi does not make this anymore and some of Ryobi's older tools may have been suspect. I think TAMA in Australia currently sells an identical sander. I just don't know if $250 is good price for this.

I would appreciate any thoughts.

Joe
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-28-2011, 03:20 PM
Philphoto's Avatar
Philphoto Philphoto is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Nehalem, Oregon
Posts: 627
Default Grizzly

Like this one from Grizzly?
http://www.grizzly.com/products/18-1...m-Sander/G0458

The sanding rolls can be a bunch of $$$ as well.

I do not have one though looking. I have a good friend that has almost every tool you could dream of. He really likes his sander like you are looking at. (I think it is a Delta, not sure). Some times all you want is a sander not a planer or other surfacing tool.

Just posting so you can get an idea on the prices.
Phil
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-28-2011, 04:14 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 629
Default

I have a Performax 16-32 - picked it up used locally. Once I bought decent paper from Klingspor I love it. I only use 120 or 150 grit (can't remember). On the Ryobi, the only bad thing I have seen is that the paper is a pain to change - but it's a pain to change on my Performax too.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-28-2011, 05:27 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

Joe,

No experience with this model ryobi. If memory serves me correct they sold for somewhere in the $400 ball park. They were not highly respected.

As for a drum sander with saw dust on it, that wouldn't bother me. No saw dust is cause for alarm. This one tool where dust colloection is a MUST.

I'm currently using my 4th Drum sander. I started out with a wood master and for some reason I never made friends with it. Since then I have owned the Performax 16-32, Performac 22-44 and currently have a Jet 10-20. (Jet bought Performax a few years ago.) The performax/Jet sanders I have used have been very good tools. I use mine a lot. If you purchase one, expect it to take a little while to get use to it.

Mike talked about using 150 and 120 grit. I don't use 150 and seldom use 120. Most of the time I use 100. Actually the grit you can use depends on the wood. I use a lot of maple and that burns easily. Oak works liike a dream with a drum sander. Soft wood like pine tends to gum up the paper.

Paper for drum sanders is a science in its self. The stuff sold by Jet, Delts, etc is just simply to expensive. Sometimes, I find ends of rolls at Flee Markets and cut that to size. Cloth backed sandpaper will normally tear straaight (I think women refer to it as ripping on the bias.) I just cut a half inch or so where I want to rip it and then have fun. A utility knife is nice to shape the ends with. Besides the grit, try nto match the weight of the paper on what the mfg sells.

Burt
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-28-2011, 06:12 PM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 529
Default

Burt,
That is interesting that you have a 10-20 sander. I guess I would have expected a larger sander since you do a lot of cabinets. I had been thinking about the new Grizzly 10-20 (G0716 http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Drum-Sander/G0716) which sells for under $450 shipped. Your choice of sanders has me thinking about the Grizzly again because I don't do very many things that would require the 32" capacity of the 16-32, much less even 24". Oh man, the choices.

Joe
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-28-2011, 07:18 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 629
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by whitejacket View Post
Burt,
That is interesting that you have a 10-20 sander. I guess I would have expected a larger sander since you do a lot of cabinets. I had been thinking about the new Grizzly 10-20 (G0716 http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Drum-Sander/G0716) which sells for under $450 shipped. Your choice of sanders has me thinking about the Grizzly again because I don't do very many things that would require the 32" capacity of the 16-32, much less even 24". Oh man, the choices.

Joe
I started with a Performax 10-20 before I found the 16/32. Even for my hobby shop use the 10-20 was too small.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-28-2011, 07:31 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

I think the choice of sanders depends on what you are doing. Mine is being used primarily for narrow, hardwood stock. I also use it for raised panel doors.

Another factor - I'm in a slow down phase before going into total retirement.

If you aren't experienced with using drum sanders, they can be totally frustrating. There is a knack to using them successfully.


Burt
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-03-2016, 08:21 AM
makita makita is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Default

A drum sander is used to sand a wood floor. I think you may be looking for a "planer" instead? I see the Yankee Workshop guy using those - it shaves off the surface of an old board. I did not see those in the Home Depot website, but the floor-sander Drum Sander is in there.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-05-2016, 02:02 AM
RJS1948 RJS1948 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 65
Default V-Drum/Flatmaster Drum Sander

I purchased a Flatmaster Drum sander from stockroom supply. As the sandpaper literally floats above the drum, sawdust does not adhere to the sandpaper. There are some videos on the site and youtube. Option1: buy the completed drum sander. Option2: Buy just the drum mechanism, a motor and build your own outer case.

Mine works well... Caution, keep your fingers above the roller... My one finger got japped and I lost a my fingernail... ouch. Today, I use a rubber base paddle to feed my lumber thru.

http://stockroomsupply.ca/shop/drum-sanders.html

Rob
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 12:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.