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  #11  
Old 08-15-2017, 12:50 PM
k_graham k_graham is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
Agree - need a movable scale. I have my 6-1/2" Makita cordless attached to my UEG and at times I need to reverse the direction of the saw - so a fixed scale would do me no good.

Mike
I don't understand that, there is a mark directly in front of the blade on the Universal Saw Base. And if not due to being a very old base one should be scribed and painted on. With that mark directly in front of the saw blade then a scale based directly from the fence should be accurate in either direction. Now if there is play in the holes I can see where it might be bumped out of accuracy, I am hoping if they send me a replacement with numbers scribed from edge of the fence it will be accurate. If the holes have play my hope would be to have it positioned and use a stud mount like locktite or an epoxy and then tighten with the unit square.

Ken Graham
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  #12  
Old 08-15-2017, 12:58 PM
k_graham k_graham is offline
 
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Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
The scales on my UEG don't indicate cut width either, they're close but not close enough to be usable. I don't understand why they etched the measuring scales into the arms rather than designing it for the stick on tapes. There is no adjustability. The way it's designed now it requires you to be 100% accurate when attaching the saw to the EZ Base but there is no procedure where you get 100% mounting accuracy when attaching the saw to the Base. It makes no sense.
On the new saw base I received I think installing 2 Anti-kickback fins, one correctly behind and one reversed in front (slot is there for the reversal as it allows for opposite mounted saw) would allow perfect alignment of blade, (assuming blade is perfect 90 degrees to base vertically as otherwise it would vary depending on blade depth). Then with mark on Universal saw base directly in front of blade it should correspond to marks on sides starting at 0 from fence. (of course one would then remove the forward anti-kickback fin after alignment, disassemble and save for use in back when needed. )

Ken Graham
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  #13  
Old 08-15-2017, 01:09 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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http://www.rockler.com/self-adhesive-measuring-tape

Quote:
Originally Posted by k_graham View Post
For a chance of a adhesive rule to work it should be Polyester not stretchable vinyl and clear laminated. My copiers only do this to 17" but I did a quick search and these appear to be right and left reading for just over 4.00 each for a 24" size. in as fine as 1/32" though probably 1/16" might be satisfactory as normally one is shooting for whole numbers like 8, 16, 24.

https://stop-painting.com/adhesive-b...fractional.asp

Ken Graham
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  #14  
Old 08-15-2017, 01:13 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Its always seemed to me that possibly no scale is better than a scale that is anything but dead nuts accurate. Not only for setting the the distance from the blade to the fence, but also to ensure that the blade is perfectly parallel with the fence.

The only way I know of to be sure about this is to extend the blade to full depth, with the UEG upside down lay a metal straight edge across the blade - resting on the saw base, and then measure and set the UEG's end rail lengths so they are identical (and correct for the cut).

Ken K.

Last edited by kenk; 08-15-2017 at 05:05 PM.
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  #15  
Old 08-15-2017, 03:44 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
Its always seemed to me that possibly no scale is better than a scale that is anything bud dead nuts accurate. Not only for setting the the distance from the blade to the fence, but also to ensure that the blade is perfectly parallel with the fence.

The only way I know of to be sure about this is to extend the blade to full depth, with the UEG upside down lay a metal straight edge across the blade - resting on the saw base, and then measure and set the UEG's end rail lengths so they are identical (and correct for the cut).

Ken K.
i use these things with a ruler. From fence to blade on the UEG

i'm not sure my eyes are good enough to get a plastic arrow dead on to 1/32 by looking at a scale.

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  #16  
Old 08-16-2017, 04:03 AM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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How many people would put up with a TS where you had to raise the blade and then measure from the front and back of the blade to the fence in order to square the fence to the blade? No, you unlock the fence move it to where you want while reading the scale or the digital readout. Lock the fence and make your cut and the cut width is just what you expected it to be.
I don't understand why we think we should be content with a tool where you have to flip it over and use a measuring tape or a gage block to figure out your cut width. Knowing the cut width is a basic function of the tool. If it isn't designed to easily and accurately allow you to adjust and know the cut width it's a poorly designed tool.
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  #17  
Old 08-16-2017, 12:03 PM
TooManyToys TooManyToys is offline
 
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http://www.tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=4274
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  #18  
Old 08-16-2017, 03:44 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
How many people would put up with a TS where you had to raise the blade and then measure from the front and back of the blade to the fence in order to square the fence to the blade? No, you unlock the fence move it to where you want while reading the scale or the digital readout. Lock the fence and make your cut and the cut width is just what you expected it to be.
I don't understand why we think we should be content with a tool where you have to flip it over and use a measuring tape or a gage block to figure out your cut width. Knowing the cut width is a basic function of the tool. If it isn't designed to easily and accurately allow you to adjust and know the cut width it's a poorly designed tool.
Can you provide EZ with recommended changes to ensure that the edge is perfectly parallel? I'm not coming up with any ideas that would still keep the entire package light enough to easily manage.

I find the the EZ products are less "automated" than many others, but that lack of automation - that simplicity - also opens the tools up for modification - for uses well beyond the design intent - and the simplicity likely results in higher reliability.
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  #19  
Old 08-16-2017, 05:14 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
How many people would put up with a TS where you had to raise the blade and then measure from the front and back of the blade to the fence in order to square the fence to the blade? No, you unlock the fence move it to where you want while reading the scale or the digital readout. Lock the fence and make your cut and the cut width is just what you expected it to be.
I don't understand why we think we should be content with a tool where you have to flip it over and use a measuring tape or a gage block to figure out your cut width. Knowing the cut width is a basic function of the tool. If it isn't designed to easily and accurately allow you to adjust and know the cut width it's a poorly designed tool.

I can't pick up my table saw with 1 hand and take it with me everywhere. I also can't rip 8ft sheets of plywood with a $100 tablesaw

You could even bring the UEG to home Depot parking lot and break down panels so they fit in a sedan.

Apples and oranges

Besides, all tape measures and rulers seem to be a bit off. If you measure 12" on one ruler, it might be slightly different than on another. When I use my crappy table saw, I always measure fence to blade with the same instrument that I used to measure the wood


I'm sure digital meters, welded joints, and other fancy additions can be put on the UEG. It's just a matter of cost.
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Last edited by tofu; 08-16-2017 at 05:17 PM.
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  #20  
Old 08-16-2017, 05:25 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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I agree with you on all of that but that's no justification for EZ not to provide the UEG with scales that are usable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tofu View Post
I can't pick up my table saw with 1 hand and take it with me everywhere. I also can't rip 8ft sheets of plywood with a $100 tablesaw

You could even bring the UEG to home Depot parking lot and break down panels so they fit in a sedan.

Apples and oranges

Besides, all tape measures and rulers seem to be a bit off. If you measure 12" on one ruler, it might be slightly different than on another. When I use my crappy table saw, I always measure fence to blade with the same instrument that I used to measure the wood


I'm sure digital meters, welded joints, and other fancy additions can be put on the UEG. It's just a matter of cost.
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