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  #11  
Old 05-22-2017, 09:17 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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This thread is saying that the Anti-Chip Edges (ACE) and the Repeater(s) simply do not work correctly. Those are pretty key EZ product elements, which is kind of disturbing.

So far I haven't had to have the kind of precision to check the performance of the ACE.

I have the repeaters and have used them, but I found them rather awkward to use. Just one of the reasons I invested in the EZ One. Again, so far I haven't had the need for the kind of high precision repeatability such as cabinet/box making, so I didn't measure it and can't comment on it.

But, well, it is disturbing to hear about. Now I need to get out there and do some precision measuring.
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  #12  
Old 05-22-2017, 09:47 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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FWIW, I've had similar concerns building cabinet carcasses but usually only with my portable setup​.

I haven't had the ACE issues others have, or else I'm not bothered by them. However, for repeated cuts I nearly always make a parallel guide jig that butts up against the off cut side of the guide rail. For cabinet carcasses, the UEG is my "go to" tool for the constants (sides, bottom depth, and back height). If I ever do have ACE problems, I'll try attaching some kind of anti-chip piece to the saw base.

Like you, I had issues with cuts being off by as much as an 1/8" when even 1/16" was unacceptable. I also think the repeater seems clunky. There has to be a simpler, more streamlined, and more comprehensive solution for getting accurate angles.

I'm still experimenting but a modified Incra miter guage attached to the off cut side of the guide rail with a sliding stop for cuts up to 32" wide seems promising at the moment.

When in doubt, I still measure twice, make a cut line, measure again, cut once.

As for tear out, I'm with some others in my poor opinion of China birch. If it's going to be seen, I use domestic ply, period. Also while it's probably over kill, I use a cross cut blade (40 tooth or more) even if it might slow me down a little. For me, slow and accurate on the front end makes for faster finishing on the back end.

Let us know how you work things out!
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  #13  
Old 05-22-2017, 10:07 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
So I took a few moments and tried to see what I could knock out quickly. So here is an idea for the cut line indicator. In the picture you can see where it so barely left the feather edge of the pencil line after the cut. Also, using a few more pieces of scrap, I now have an adjustable story stick. Neither are spectacular. but they didn't cost anything, and I am pretty sure they will work quite well. Let's just call them prototypes.
A man after my own heart, Absinthe!! I love it when improv happens... and it works! Well done- please post follow-ups after you've used it a while to let us know how it's working, as well as any mods you make.

Nice!
Rick
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  #14  
Old 05-22-2017, 10:24 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Kerrville, Tx.
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As has been mentioned, it's a bit tricky to hold the fence of the repeater/cabinet maker tightly against the material being cut and not have it slide, or tilt, or move some other way.

One small change I did to my set-up was to ditch the EZ handle, and incorporate a different handle. (see pic)

This handle, which is easily moved from one position to another, changes the hold-in-position leverage dramatically!

While a side-slot handle doesn't have to look like mine, just having something/anything there, as a handle, will greatly improve one's ability to control the track while cutting.
HTH,
Rick
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  #15  
Old 05-23-2017, 03:08 AM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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You've got the sequence correct, or that's the way I'd do it. Use your UEG to end up with 2 panels 32x23-1/4, then the Cabinetmaker to square the ends. I'd cut the panel in half at 24" then flip and cut the first edge to get 23-1/4. Also when squaring cut both edges. In my experience it's really hard to get the Square on the Cabinetmaker to cut perfectly square so the shorter the cut the better. Your 56" track is plenty long to cut the 24" length, so that'd work well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
seanc -

I have both tools. However, I don't really know when to stop using the cabinet maker and start using the UEG...

FWIW, I am still using a very small car. So when I get a sheet of plywood I have them cut to to 32x48 unless I am forced to buy the 24x48 precut partial sheets. When I make cabinet boxes I try to square it up, then cut one size, then cut the other size. I have found that I am not really able to cut the whole length of a 48 with the cabinet maker on the 56". I really do need just a little more length.

So once the cabinet maker is on there and cutting away, when would I want to switch to the UEG?

So here is a thought. Using the factory edge I can square the 32" side. Then I can use the UEG against that side to come up with 23-1/4" panel width, then UEG against that cut and cut the waste off the other end of that panel. I would then have 2 panels of parallel sides cut to width and having unknown lengths. With the cabinet maker I can square off one side first, then cut the other side to final length. That would keep me from needing to cut the whole 48 on the cabinet maker. Does that sound like what you were thinking? I did a lot of dancing the last time I used the UEG, I have some non-slip stuff now that may help with that problem.

Once these cabinets are off to my daughter, I will go back to working on the shop cabinets. Since they are on my time, I can experiment.
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  #16  
Old 05-23-2017, 09:53 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post

While a side-slot handle doesn't have to look like mine, just having something/anything there, as a handle, will greatly improve one's ability to control the track while cutting.
HTH,
Rick
So do you use this instead of the cabinet maker handle? or somehow in addition to it? Does the protractor shaping and such have some purpose too?
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  #17  
Old 05-23-2017, 10:01 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
You've got the sequence correct, or that's the way I'd do it. Use your UEG to end up with 2 panels 32x23-1/4, then the Cabinetmaker to square the ends. I'd cut the panel in half at 24" then flip and cut the first edge to get 23-1/4. Also when squaring cut both edges. In my experience it's really hard to get the Square on the Cabinetmaker to cut perfectly square so the shorter the cut the better. Your 56" track is plenty long to cut the 24" length, so that'd work well.
I will give this a try on the next project. I have an area in the shop that I want to do 67 linear inches of cabinets. So once I am done with my daughter's cabinets I will be cutting likely 6 lower panels for this. I will use this sequence.

At this point, I still don't have the best work surface and perhaps need to come up with something a little better, especially for using the UEG.

So that will be the next order of things, best work surface or simply to just cut over the edge or use the mdf top sacrificially. .
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  #18  
Old 05-23-2017, 01:01 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
So do you use this instead of the cabinet maker handle?

Got rid of the cabinet maker handle. (well.... stuck it in the 'misc. parts' drawer) For me, the leverage required to use the EZ handle was difficult and frustrating. Might be due to my short stature/short reach/small hands/etc.?
Pic one shows both handles installed on the cabinet maker. If you grab and push the EZ handle, you'll do ok at the beginning of the cut, but it requires a bit more finesse towards the end of the cut, not counting that the ergonomics of holding the handle/pushing the saw get more difficult towards the far reach of the cut.
Using the side handle, it's not an issue. Less pressure required to hold the whole affair in place, as well as better control to keep the track from moving. For me, the difference is night and day.


or somehow in addition to it?

Pic two shows a typical set-up. The black plastic on the left of the cabinet maker fence is to keep the fence flush to the top of the table. I could have used a piece of wood instead of the plastic, but had the plastic handy.
Also, note in this pic that I've located the handle towards the further end. In this position, it is very comfortable and stable for me to use my hip/thigh to push against the cabinet maker fence, while at the same time, hold the handle. Also, in this position, pushing the saw across the track is much easier. The end result is a very safe/stable/comfortable cut.

Before switching over to the side handle and using the EZ handle, I had lots of drifting cuts; since going solely to the side handle, I've had none.


Does the protractor shaping and such have some purpose too?
Not really. All you care about is having something attached to the side of the EZ track that allows you to achieve good control when you use it.

In pic three, you can see three variations. The triangular one is held on by the metric half-barrel nuts shown. These are a direct fit into the side track slot and require no modification.

The middle handle is a piece of baltic ply that has been randomly shaped. The bolts act as something to hold onto (or, if you have a studded handle, use that instead); the circular cut-out allows my thumb to hook on to it, if that is easier in a given situation. (I've found, for most cuts, just hooking the cut-out w/my thumb works best.) For 10 mins labor, it works super.
It is held on by #10 machine thread screws that have had their heads slightly filed- just enough to fit into the track side slot. The bolts are then tightened using either #10 nuts, or, the thumb screws.


Finally, on the right, the "D" handles are held in by a bit of aluminum I milled to allow the quickest possible insert/remove into the track. They are held on by the thumb screws.

I get it that some are quite satisfied using the EZ handle- just didn't work for me; hence, my journey to find out what would work- these handles are my answer.
YMMV,
Rick
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