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  #21  
Old 10-07-2011, 01:45 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vincentvega View Post
Can you explain how you are plunge cutting with your EZ tools? Thanks
http://tracksawforum.com/showthread....7528#post17528
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  #22  
Old 10-07-2011, 02:09 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Anyway, it's the beginning of an idea. Maybe it'll jog your mind into another path that works.

Thanks,
Rick
I got a few ideas while reading you post. The first is to use an Incra miter gauge that I have. Years ago I used it with the tablesaw but this could give it a new lease on life. A hinged rail would be attached to the Incra.

The other idea involves T-Track on the rear wall as Randal suggested to allow the rail to be positioned anywhere on the bench. The T-Track will hold a slotted bracket for easy height adjustment.

I also want to do some research on the bearings that 8020 makes. They have some interesting stuff that may be of use here.

I am just starting to get ideas about this articulating crosscut setup. It will be a while before I get to the point of playing around with this.

Last edited by Ken; 10-07-2011 at 02:21 AM.
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  #23  
Old 10-16-2011, 03:42 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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I have been busy with other work but I did get a chance to do a little more today. I had a bunch of old kitchen cabs to install in the shop but they had some water damage. I used the ply off of the sides of the beds (the free beds I got, pics are in a previous post) to repair the cabs. The tops of the beds are on the walls instead of sheetrock, and today I used the drawers to make 4 more base cabs. All I had to do was cut the lip off of the drawer front with a jig saw and glue them together with construction adhesive. I had enough drawers to make 4 base cabs. Latter I will cut a hole in the front and make a face frame and door for each cab. I even used the side of the beds that had cutouts for the drawers as a temporary work table today to cut cement board with a little hand held 4" wet saw. Nothing is going to waste.
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File Type: jpg Cab from drawers 01.jpg (106.2 KB, 45 views)
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  #24  
Old 10-17-2011, 01:24 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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I had a little bit of time this weekend so I got some of the upper cabinets installed. As you can see in one of the pics these were old cabs that had some water damage. I had to replace the sides on a few of them. The EZ-One and a saw made this task quick and easy. I didn't even bother with a router to cut the dado's. The saw was already on the bench and I had a couple 1/4" dado's made in less time then it would take to set up a router. Extreme precision here was not needed. Cut the board to size, hold it in place, mark for the dado's, cut them a bit oversize, and glue up the assembly with PL Premium. Wood from the sides of the beds were used to do this. By the time I am done I don't think that there will be anything left of the beds and whatever scrap there is will get converted into heat in the wood stove.

I have 2 more uppers left to install but I have to replace the sides on them first.

I am hoping that with this I will finally have enough storage that I can have a few clutter free work surfaces. One of my biggest problems working in a small shop is that there is no place to put stuff. Once the lowers and counter top are in I should be in good shape.

I am thinking about putting a shop vac in one of the lowers and insulating it to deaden the sound. Pipes and blast gates will keep vacuum hoses from laying on the floor all the time and simplify hookups. Combined with a switched outlet by each port to auto turn on/off the vacuum should make for a very convenient to use setup.
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File Type: jpg Upper cab 01.jpg (104.7 KB, 52 views)
File Type: jpg Upper cab 02.jpg (105.6 KB, 45 views)
File Type: jpg Upper cab 03.jpg (107.7 KB, 40 views)

Last edited by Ken; 10-17-2011 at 01:44 PM.
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  #25  
Old 10-17-2011, 02:22 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Ken,

Looking good.

You know the law of stuff; what you have will expand to fill the available space. And the law of workshops; every horizontal surface is a magnet for the stuff that is filling the space.

I inherited a vacuum in a box from my dad and the vacuum died soon after I got it. Make sure you have enough air flow for the motor to be cooled sufficiently.
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  #26  
Old 10-17-2011, 03:26 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Ken,

'don't know what kind of Vac you have but I think the Fein's would be quiet enough with out having to insulate it.

Burt
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  #27  
Old 10-17-2011, 05:31 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dik Harrison View Post
You know the law of stuff; what you have will expand to fill the available space. And the law of workshops; every horizontal surface is a magnet for the stuff that is filling the space.

Very true but I do wish that someone would explain to me just why this happens? For the time being the law of lack of funds means that more stuff will not fill the space....... but then again I will be using the space to generate extra income.


I inherited a vacuum in a box from my dad and the vacuum died soon after I got it. Make sure you have enough air flow for the motor to be cooled sufficiently.

Good point, I will make sure that there is enough ventilation.

Burt,

I have 2 vacuums that I use in the shop. One is a Festool CT33. It is quiet enough, not quite as quiet as a Fein but close. One thing I really like about the Festool is that it has variable speed which very handy for sanding. For sanding the vacuum is set to half speed and is practically inaudible. I made a box that fits on the top of the vacuum and mounted a cyclone on it.

The other vac is a Ridgid, its a screamer, but a powerful one. The Ridgid can be seen in one of the pics in my last post. I paid a little over $30 for it on a close out. It was being replaced by a newer model that had the ability to use a bag. If you look close you can see that I modified the vac so that I can use a bag. The bag works great for things like sanding sheetrock which normally plug up the filter fast. The Ridgid is the one that I want to put in a cab partially for the noise but mostly to get it out of my way (I wear ear plugs when I work). It will get hooked up permanently with tubing run overhead for a couple of benches. Most likely I will make a DIY separator for it.
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  #28  
Old 10-17-2011, 06:50 PM
Mel Beck Mel Beck is offline
 
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Ken
Instead of using a switched outlet I've found that X-10 appliance modules are EZier, handier, more versatile, and cheaper. Plus using the wireless controls are very handy.

They even have 240vac modules.
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Last edited by Mel Beck; 10-17-2011 at 06:52 PM. Reason: Added 240volt
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  #29  
Old 10-17-2011, 07:35 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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I have a lot of X-10 throughout the house and use it for a system similar to what Ken is talking about in the shop. For my big DC system, which was installed long before I got into X-10, I put micro switches on the blast gates and low voltage (12vdc) between them and a relay that switches the 240VAC. Open a blast gate and it comes on, start to close the gate and it goes off.
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  #30  
Old 10-17-2011, 08:49 PM
TheOne TheOne is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel Beck View Post
Ken
Instead of using a switched outlet I've found that X-10 appliance modules are EZier, handier, more versatile, and cheaper. Plus using the wireless controls are very handy.

They even have 240vac modules.
Mel, where do I find the X-10 modules and how much are they.
Thanks, Ed
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