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Old 05-10-2011, 01:22 AM
davegadgeteer davegadgeteer is offline
 
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Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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Default EZ-one newbie 2nd impressions

I've been using my new EZ-system with great pleasure lately. Smooth! I've moved two table saws out of my garage and moved the EZ system into the freed-up space. I'm glad I upgraded to the Makita 10" saw.

I've especially enjoyed using the SSRK. I've never had such easy control of my router before.

I upgraded to a new DeWalt DW621K router, which was highly recommended, and really works well. My first project was to rout the edges of sliding wood (salvaged old 3/4" cabinet plywood) panels for the EZ-one to fit the SME grooves, with the panels trapped by the lips in the front SMEs but merely supported by tongues in the sliding support SMEs, so they can move away without being trapped. The downside of having the sliding panels installed at last is that I now put stuff on them, which then gets in the way!

I'm getting rid of my old Craftsman saws and routers at a rapid pace.

I added a Oneida Molded DIY Dust Deputy Cyclone to my shop vac, which also is working out well.

I made a stand to hold the Oneida Cyclone above my shop vac, using 4 legs that slope up along the corners of the motor housing on the Sears shop vac and support a plywood piece big enough to hold a 5 gallon bucket above the vac (leaving a couple inches space for the motor-exhaust air).

The legs are 2x4 pieces with a shallow V cut into the 4" side, a 110 degree V. Rather than tilting the saw, which would interfere with the EAC, I crosscut another scrap of 2x4 at 55 degrees (instead of 90) and screwed a 30 inch piece of 2x4 to that sloped end like the top of a T. Then I put the 30 inch piece under the bridge to rip it and adjusted the saw to start cutting about half an inch from the top corner of the 2x4 and going in straight down about to the centerline, the bottom of the V. So the 2x4 is tilted, sitting on its narrow side but tilted 35 degrees and held by the beveled scrap. Then I unscrewed the 30 inch piece, turned it over, screwed it on again, and repeated the other side of the V symmetrically. Had to be careful where I put the screw, of course. Then I chopped the 30 inch piece into 4 to make the rough legs, which I eventually attached to the vac with one screw each right at the corners of the plastic vac motor housing. Didn't hit any wires inside...

Now I had to cut the tops of the sloping legs at very odd angles to make them end in the plane of the horizontal plywood piece. That was tricky, and I tried several things. The method that worked best was to put some blocks on top of the center of the motor area (which is horizontal and flat), and use the router carefully based on those blocks to even up the legs. I found it hard to control a plane well enough, especially given that the plane can only cut a little at a time. But holding the router in alignment wasn't easy, so I'm ordering some more extrusions that I can use to solve similar problems in the future. I'm thinking something like a stiffer version of the dual SSRK, with a sliding perpendicular track crossing two parallel tracks, and the SSRK holding the router near the perpendicular track. I want to be able to choose geometric planes and rout odd things (like the 4 legs above) to fit them. This would be a possible way to flatten a base on an odd-shaped piece of driftwood, too.

The vac with bucket on top and cyclone on top of that was constantly tangling me in the 3 hoses and the cord, so I used some 2" plastic pipe and fittings, just slipped together, to make a nearly rigid connection between the vac and the top center of the cyclone, greatly reducing the space claimed by this monster. A plastic pipe to male thread adapter was just right, with the threads sanded down, to fit a 2.5" vacuum hose socket. Very cheap compared to vacuum cleaner fittings, and anyway I couldn't find 90 degree elbows except for pipe. A $20 Sears vacuum controller turns the vac on when the saw or other tool is turned on, and lets it run a bit after the saw turns off. I still need to do some static electricity grounding, though--I can see static effects inside the bucket and feel them in my hair when I bend down beside it. Don't want a spark to ignite the sawdust.

I'm really impressed with how well the EZ system works, how the pieces support one another and can be used in many combinations. It does take a little practice, one has to learn to think of the cuts upside down, a bit like to be done with a radial saw but a heck of a lot safer.

I'm definitely finished with my table saws already. I'll probably get rid of my radial arm saw soon too. But I'll probably keep my 12" Milwaukee dual bevel miter saw (incredibly dangerous--nibbled a finger once, but grew back OK already). That's so handy with its digital miter readout, and cuts so smoothly--the improvement over my old single bevel 10" Craftsman miter saw was so dramatic that I started searching for an upgrade for my table saws, which is when I discovered EurekaZone, fortunately.

Now I'm going to add more extrusions and clamps to my arsenal. I want to be able to use the SSRK on board edges at odd angles, for example. And I want to try some other ideas for cable drive (just because I got interested in the problem of moving slippery cables with force).

Another thing I want is some kind of caliper that I can use to set spacings between EZ stops. I have a nice digital caliper that I can set to the value I need, but it is very awkward to (i.e. I can't) reach past the clamp knobs etc to get it in the right place to use for setting the SSRK stops. Maybe I can find an old fashioned screw-adjusted inside caliper, kind of like a mechanical drawing compass, that I could use for this. Seems like it should have small balls on its tips, and be able to take a bit of force without its losing its setting.

I'm wondering if the $100 Wixey digital saw fence readout would be adaptable to and useful on the SSRK. I'm constantly having to move over by a bit's radius one way then back by a different bit's radius the other, etc. Being able to measure and reset the zero easily could speed this up.

My very first EZ-one project was making beveled rip cuts in 3/4" thick big, long, chunks of IKEA cabinetry I salvaged, to make a weather housing for my water softener. I joined the beveled edges with biscuits and glue. The laminate is dangerously sharp, and the bevels cut me a few times before I deliberately dulled the corners with a sander. It ended up looking like a speaker's podium, with a sloping hinged top at about 20 degrees. The laminated surface looks like nice wood, so the whole effect is rather bizarre, with this nice speaker's podium standing outdoors next to several trash cans, just hiding/protecting my water softener!

Last edited by davegadgeteer; 05-11-2011 at 03:28 PM. Reason: generalize topic
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  #2  
Old 05-11-2011, 09:15 AM
Dino Dino is offline
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dave, thanks for the real time/real user feedback.
If you can narrow this one down to the ez-one I will post it on a new feedback section on the site.

enjoy your ez-one.
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  #3  
Old 05-11-2011, 09:56 AM
Burt Burt is offline
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Dave,

Excellent write-up!! I thought that I had added comments earlier.


Burt
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  #4  
Old 05-11-2011, 03:26 PM
davegadgeteer davegadgeteer is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 95
Smile EZ-one newbie 2nd impressions

I've been using my new EZ-one with great pleasure lately. Smooth! I've moved two table saws out of my garage and moved the EZ system into the freed-up space. I'm glad I upgraded to the Makita 10" saw.

My latest project was to make the sliding panels, with lips that trap them in the front SMEs but just a tongue that will let the sliding support SMEs support them but not trap them. Used the SSRK for that. The downside of having the sliding panels installed at last is that I now put stuff on them, which then gets in the way!

I'm getting rid of my old Craftsman power tools at a rapid pace. I still like their C3 LiIon battery system, though, and the tools that are compatible with that.

I needed some short legs made of 2x4 pieces with a shallow V cut into the 4" side, a 110 degree V. Rather than tilting the saw, which would interfere with the EAC, I crosscut another scrap of 2x4 at 55 degrees (instead of 90) and screwed a 30 inch piece of 2x4 to that sloped end like the top of a T. Then I put the 30 inch piece under the bridge to rip it and adjusted the saw to start cutting about half an inch from the top corner of the 2x4 and going in straight down about to the centerline, the bottom of the V. So the 2x4 is tilted, sitting on its narrow side but tilted 35 degrees and held by the beveled scrap. Then I unscrewed the 30 inch piece, turned it over, screwed it on again, and repeated the other side of the V symmetrically. (110=180-2*35.) Had to be careful where I put the screw, of course. Then I chopped the 30 inch piece into 4 to make the needed legs with grooves.

I'm really impressed with how well the EZ system works, how the pieces support one another and can be used in many combinations. It does take a little practice; one has to learn to think of the cuts upside down, a bit like to be done with a radial saw but a heck of a lot safer.

I'm definitely finished with my table saws already. I'll probably get rid of my radial arm saw soon too. But I'll probably keep my 12" Milwaukee dual bevel miter saw (incredibly dangerous--nibbled a finger once, but grew back OK already). That's so handy with its digital miter readout, and cuts so smoothly--the improvement over my old single bevel 10" Craftsman miter saw was so dramatic that I started searching for an upgrade for my table saws, which is when I discovered EurekaZone, fortunately.

My very first EZ-one project, before I had received any other components like the SSRK, was making beveled rip cuts in 3/4" thick big, long, chunks of IKEA cabinetry I salvaged, to make a weather housing for my water softener. I joined the beveled edges with biscuits and glue. The laminate is dangerously sharp, and the bevels cut me a few times before I deliberately dulled the corners with a sander. It ended up looking like a speaker's podium, with a sloping hinged top at about 20 degrees. The laminated surface looks like nice wood, so the whole effect is rather bizarre, with this nice speaker's podium standing outdoors next to several trash cans, just hiding/protecting my water softener! I'm tempted to mount a dummy microphone and lamp on it just for effect...
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  #5  
Old 05-11-2011, 03:50 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Location: Edison NJ
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Quote:
I'm definitely finished with my table saws already. I'll probably get rid of my radial arm saw soon too. But I'll probably keep my 12" Milwaukee dual bevel miter saw (incredibly dangerous--nibbled a finger once, but grew back OK already). That's so handy with its digital miter readout, and cuts so smoothly--the improvement over my old single bevel 10" Craftsman miter saw was so dramatic that I started searching for an upgrade for my table saws, which is when I discovered EurekaZone, fortunately.
You too?
last time I use the scms was to cut some aluminum for a prototype...
here goes the sliding door with double glass.
both glasses not just one.

I just finished playing with the new cross cut fences on the ez-one.
I received few pic's from Andy and later from Burt.

The new fences are screaming for digital readouts and I cant wait to see
pic's from Burt and Andy at the forum.
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  #6  
Old 05-11-2011, 05:49 PM
davegadgeteer davegadgeteer is offline
 
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In the early 70's I was putting a suspended ceiling in our converted garage family room, cutting the aluminum tracks with my radial arm saw (the same one I have today, actually). Somehow a piece of the aluminum went flying and cut a gash in the heavy window drapery. I just glued the edges together, and you can still see the scar--it never did heal! Of course, we intended to replace the draperies "soon".

The suspended ceiling was a good idea, though. Later added fiberglas insulation on top of it, but it's been really handy to be able to open it up and snake video, audio, and internet cables across the room. Dad was helping me with that project. I really miss him when I'm working on projects. He could make anything from anything (grew up in the Depression). And he was really efficient--made jigs and organized the work rapidly. Three rooms in our house have at least one full wall and some have 2+ made of elegant built-in cabinets and drawers he made of paneling glued over wood frames. Lots of bevel cuts. He lived to 91, died in 2008. He was a preacher, but often fixed stuff for the members. He even rebuilt parts of the inner workings of the church pneumatic pipe organ!

We're still using the fluorescent ceiling fixtures he salvaged from somewhere, though the ballasts have all been replaced a few times.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:22 PM
toollovingschultz toollovingschultz is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davegadgeteer View Post
In the early 70's I was putting a suspended ceiling in our converted garage family room, cutting the aluminum tracks with my radial arm saw (the same one I have today, actually). Somehow a piece of the aluminum went flying and cut a gash in the heavy window drapery. I just glued the edges together, and you can still see the scar--it never did heal! Of course, we intended to replace the draperies "soon".

The suspended ceiling was a good idea, though. Later added fiberglas insulation on top of it, but it's been really handy to be able to open it up and snake video, audio, and internet cables across the room. Dad was helping me with that project. I really miss him when I'm working on projects. He could make anything from anything (grew up in the Depression). And he was really efficient--made jigs and organized the work rapidly. Three rooms in our house have at least one full wall and some have 2+ made of elegant built-in cabinets and drawers he made of paneling glued over wood frames. Lots of bevel cuts. He lived to 91, died in 2008. He was a preacher, but often fixed stuff for the members. He even rebuilt parts of the inner workings of the church pneumatic pipe organ!

We're still using the fluorescent ceiling fixtures he salvaged from somewhere, though the ballasts have all been replaced a few times.
Dave on this cutting ceiling grid with a radial arm saw I just have one thing to say tin snips
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