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Old 09-09-2012, 03:36 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Default Bosch Colt on SSRK

Just a quick post about a setup I did this weekend to rout the floor as close as possible to a wall to allow for installation of a flush hearth with a wood border. I bought a Bosch Colt for the job since the only choices I had on hand were several large routers or a Dremel tool that I had made a SSRK mount for. The routers were way too big and the Dremel wouldn't take a 1/4" bit (down cut). I made the base so that it could be mounted from either of two adjacent sides, giving me the ability to have the router mounted in the opposite corner and then be able to mount the whole thing so that the router was on one side or the other.

Here I have the setup mounted so the router will be on the left side.
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Here it is on the right side.
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This is an over view of the area being worked.
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A little closer look at the setup, note that I had just finished routing the far end perpendicular to this cut, so I still had to remount the setup to be on the right side.
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Lastly, a close up of the setup.
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Soon, I'll be posting a write-up of the project on my blog.
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2012, 04:52 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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I have added the first article about this project to my blog.
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  #3  
Old 09-09-2012, 05:42 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Good goin', Dik...... I love it when the good guys win!
Last year, I had to do a similar straight cut, only, in some 1/2" tile. I ended up duct-taping the track to the floor; took a couple of slow, shallow cuts; surprised myself with how well it turned out.
Thanks for posting; it's always helpful to me to see how others take care of their "Goliaths".
Rick
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Old 09-09-2012, 05:46 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Dik,

Nice setup! We're finding more and more reasons to have multiple bases for the SSRK.

I've bought several routers of that class router with the idea of mounting them on a SSRK so I can make multiple cuts and do fancy moldings in one pass. Someday I'll get around to working on it. Work wise I am mostly retired but there is always something demanding immediate attention. I still love your line, "So many ideas: So little time."

Burt

Last edited by Burt; 09-09-2012 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 09-10-2012, 08:20 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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very cool, Dik. Also, your renderings are very cool. It's good to see how many ways the track and ssrk can be used.

Seeing how you kept the track from moving was informative (on your blog). Has anyone done anything like this on a wall? I mean securing a track to a wall in order to make straight cuts?

Here's why: I'm in the (very slow) process of making a cabinet for the bathroom that will fit between the wall studs. I've cut a small opening enough to see that there are no wires back there, etc. But using a rotozip and doing test cuts to make this opening and see if I could get a decent cut, I wasn't able to to get anything very straight. I have been thinking about using a small battery powered track saw, or a rotozip mounted to the ssrk.

I don't know about the wisdom of using it on a vertical surface, though, perhaps affixing it to the wall like you did to the floor.
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Last edited by Goblu; 09-10-2012 at 08:24 PM. Reason: omission
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Old 09-10-2012, 09:13 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
very cool, Dik. Also, your renderings are very cool. It's good to see how many ways the track and ssrk can be used.

Seeing how you kept the track from moving was informative (on your blog). Has anyone done anything like this on a wall? I mean securing a track to a wall in order to make straight cuts?

Here's why: I'm in the (very slow) process of making a cabinet for the bathroom that will fit between the wall studs. I've cut a small opening enough to see that there are no wires back there, etc. But using a rotozip and doing test cuts to make this opening and see if I could get a decent cut, I wasn't able to to get anything very straight. I have been thinking about using a small battery powered track saw, or a rotozip mounted to the ssrk.

I don't know about the wisdom of using it on a vertical surface, though, perhaps affixing it to the wall like you did to the floor.
Katie, I've 'attached' track to walls, vertically, like this:
-In my case, I set my laser up to mark the vertical line where I want the cut to be, or, alternatively, pop a chalk line. Then, I set the track up so the saw will be cutting this line. I hold the track in place by using a couple of pieces of wood, say, eg, a 2'+ of 1 x 4, or whatever. I set one piece of wood horiz., at the bottom of the vertically-standing track, w/one end of the board on the track and the other end on the wall; run a screw thru the wood into the bottom plate, till the wood begins to bow in a bit, thereby 'pinching' the track against the wall. I then repeat w/the other 1 x 4 higher up.
These two boards will hold the track in place.
Place the saw in position on the track, and CAREFULLY plunge cut to start. Cut as far as possible; remove the track, finish the cut by hand. (I usually use a Fein Multimaster for the final finish cut, since my circular saw can't get all the way to the floor, or all the way to the ceiling.)
If this isn't clear, let me know and I'll mock this up and post some pics.
Rick
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:11 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Katie, I've 'attached' track to walls, vertically, like this:
-In my case, I set my laser up to mark the vertical line where I want the cut to be, or, alternatively, pop a chalk line. Then, I set the track up so the saw will be cutting this line. I hold the track in place by using a couple of pieces of wood, say, eg, a 2'+ of 1 x 4, or whatever. I set one piece of wood horiz., at the bottom of the vertically-standing track, w/one end of the board on the track and the other end on the wall; run a screw thru the wood into the bottom plate, till the wood begins to bow in a bit, thereby 'pinching' the track against the wall. I then repeat w/the other 1 x 4 higher up.
These two boards will hold the track in place.
Place the saw in position on the track, and CAREFULLY plunge cut to start. Cut as far as possible; remove the track, finish the cut by hand. (I usually use a Fein Multimaster for the final finish cut, since my circular saw can't get all the way to the floor, or all the way to the ceiling.)
If this isn't clear, let me know and I'll mock this up and post some pics.
Rick
Thanks, Rick! I like this idea, since it does not involve making holes in the track. I'm going to try it and if I have further questions, I'll ask. It sounds like just one screw is used at each end, although I originally envisioned two at each end of the horizontal board, going into the baseplate or further up into the wall at the stud (in my case).

First, I have to attach the small battery operated circular saw to a base. Or I could attach the rotozip to the SSRK base, but I'll try the saw first. I wish I had one of the fancy new bases that are anticipated with all the holes in the bottom predrilled, etc.
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Last edited by Goblu; 09-11-2012 at 01:24 PM. Reason: clarity
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Old 09-11-2012, 02:33 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
Thanks, Rick! I like this idea, since it does not involve making holes in the track. I'm going to try it and if I have further questions, I'll ask. It sounds like just one screw is used at each end, although I originally envisioned two at each end of the horizontal board, going into the baseplate or further up into the wall at the stud (in my case).

First, I have to attach the small battery operated circular saw to a base. Or I could attach the rotozip to the SSRK base, but I'll try the saw first. I wish I had one of the fancy new bases that are anticipated with all the holes in the bottom predrilled, etc.
Katie,
If you do the horiz. boards, one screw, mid-board, is enough to cause the wood to 'pinch' the track to the wall.

Misc. thoughts/observations/tidbits (apologies ahead of time if this is all redundant to you):
-If all you are cutting is sheetrock, we can make this easier. My first main trade, which I did for 13+ years was as a sheetrocker.
Sheet rock is normally cut with a sharp mat knife. When the piece of s/r is being cut before hanging, it is scored (on the face side) with a mat knife, just enough to penetrate the thin paper covering. Then, 'pop' one side of the scored piece of s/r away from you, and it will 'hinge' on the back-side paper. Cut thru that w/the knife, and you have your sized piece. A quick rasp on the cut edge will smooth it up.
-If sheetrock is already in place, you can still cut it with a mat knife. First, just score the line where you want it cut; only cut slightly enough to define the knife mark in the sheet rock; ie, not pressing too hard with the knife. You can do this freehand, or, follow the knife blade against a guide (EZ track edge?) held in place with the other hand. Then, run the blade along this scored line again (guide not needed now), pressing a bit harder. Repeat this a few times, pressing a bit harder @ time, and you'll be thru the rock in no time. Clean the edge up with the rasp.
-If the mat knife is not an option, you can use a skill saw (not recommended, but sometimes required/desired), or, a rotozip.
If using a saw, don't set the blade to cut all the way thru. Leave about 1/16" uncut. Finish the cut with the mat knife. (Wires/pipes are my main concern here.) This method will create an insane mess.
If using a rotozip, use un-piloted bits. Again, don't cut all the way thru- leave just enough to finish off w/the mat knife. (If I'm using my rotozip, I usually go slow and freehand the cut- ie. no guide.)
-The best way I've found, tho, to cut sheet rock that is in my way, is w/the Fein oscillating tool. Sometimes, if I need it really straight, I'll run the Fein blade against a straight edge. I don't try to cut all the way thru in one pass, I usually make one light pass, then finish the cut w/another pass. A # of oscillating tool blade-companies make variations on sheet rock blades. They all work fine.
Using the Fein, w/a straight edge gives the cleanest, straightest cut w/the least mess. And, it's usually the quickest method.
HTH,
Rick

Last edited by bumpnstump; 09-11-2012 at 02:36 PM.
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  #9  
Old 09-11-2012, 05:30 PM
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Philphoto Philphoto is offline
 
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Someone brought up sheet rock some months ago about the time the Ripsizer came out. I kept remembering my rotary paper trimmer for trimming photographs. I took a large pizza cutting wheel and sharpened it, removed the plastic ACE strips and the wheel worked pretty good, cutting a nice score into the sheet. Only made a few cuts but it helped when you have weak wrists and gimpy arm like me. Kinda funny, I know but it worked. Had to switch and cut the last paper "hinge" with a knife but it was only paper by that time and weak wrists did not matter.

Phil
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:15 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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It's sheetrock covered with plaster Kind of strange and hard to find studs in, but I found one stud/metal finder that works very dependably and is reasonable cost. I'm going to try it at another site that is plaster with lath, THEN covered with sheetrock eventually.

I've pounded many rows of nails at both places trying to find studs for various projects. Here it is if anyone is interested: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ls_o06_s00_i00 Way better than the two other products (one of them a different zircon) that the hardware store recommended but didn't work (Hence the rows of nails technique). I can never figure out why they just don't stock the good tool locally.

Thanks for all the input. I'm going to start with the multitool (I have a Rockwell) and do some practice cuts using a straightedge, Rick. I got a chuckle about the pizza cutter idea, Phil. I have a big pizza cutter that I rarely use, so think I'll sharpen it for various cutting uses. Maybe I'll score the plaster before I use the multi-tool or rotozip. Just to test it out.

This is a slow project, due to work and family demands plus some major necessary projects, but I'll post something if it turns out well.

I hope all this is not a hijack of Dik's original post, that is really excellent!
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Last edited by Goblu; 09-11-2012 at 11:19 PM. Reason: clarity
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