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Old 12-29-2013, 10:04 PM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
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Default Homemade floors from plywood?

I'm considering making some flooring from plywood for my house. I would purchase a set of repeaters and cut 8" strips ( I will use the leftover for wall cuts ).I plan on using my router to cut tongue and grooves in the wood. I will stain the floors a darker color to hide any inperfections. Any tips or advice?
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:44 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddiecalder View Post
I'm considering making some flooring from plywood for my house. I would purchase a set of repeaters and cut 8" strips ( I will use the leftover for wall cuts ).I plan on using my router to cut tongue and grooves in the wood. I will stain the floors a darker color to hide any inperfections. Any tips or advice?
What kind of plywood? How are you going to attach it or glue it together? Will the outside layer of veneer be thick enough?

Excuse all of the questions. I'm just giving you my first reaction.


Burt
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:50 PM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Burt View Post
What kind of plywood? How are you going to attach it or glue it together? Will the outside layer of veneer be thick enough?

Excuse all of the questions. I'm just giving you my first reaction.


Burt
Planning in nailing and glueing it down. Not really sure what type of ply to use yet.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:19 AM
Jim Pierson Jim Pierson is offline
 
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Default Buy vs makin' your own

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Originally Posted by eddiecalder View Post
Planning in nailing and glueing it down. Not really sure what type of ply to use yet.
Eddie,

Not sure that you can beat the price of pre-fabricated flooring on a per square foot price versus manufacturing your own. There is less than 32 sq ft of flooring per sheet (since you will lose some due to kerfs and such). Lumber Liquidators has a huge sale going on to reduce end of year inventory (read avoiding inventory taxes). I don't have any relationship with Lumber Liquidators but a quick Internet search shows a sale on gunstock Oak flooring for 1.39/sqft. A true hardwood floor can be refinished several times over its life. How does that compare to the cost of plywood? The depth of veneer on plywood would pretty much keep you from refinishing the floor in the future. A pre-engineered wood floor has the same issue of depth of veneer. I would avoid gluing the pre-engineered floor down because you wouldn't be able to replace it easily nor repair any future oops's.

I can absolutely tell you through experience, DO NOT take up an old wood floor then re-lay it. What a terrible experience that was..... The floor ended up being beautimous, but took a lot of effort to wedge each and every board into place... nail it, then have a pro level the floor. I did this when I combined two bedrooms into one, and re-layed the 100 yr old fir floor to cover the missing wall seam.
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Old 12-30-2013, 06:41 PM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Pierson View Post
Eddie,

Not sure that you can beat the price of pre-fabricated flooring on a per square foot price versus manufacturing your own. There is less than 32 sq ft of flooring per sheet (since you will lose some due to kerfs and such). Lumber Liquidators has a huge sale going on to reduce end of year inventory (read avoiding inventory taxes). I don't have any relationship with Lumber Liquidators but a quick Internet search shows a sale on gunstock Oak flooring for 1.39/sqft. A true hardwood floor can be refinished several times over its life. How does that compare to the cost of plywood? The depth of veneer on plywood would pretty much keep you from refinishing the floor in the future. A pre-engineered wood floor has the same issue of depth of veneer. I would avoid gluing the pre-engineered floor down because you wouldn't be able to replace it easily nor repair any future oops's.

I can absolutely tell you through experience, DO NOT take up an old wood floor then re-lay it. What a terrible experience that was..... The floor ended up being beautimous, but took a lot of effort to wedge each and every board into place... nail it, then have a pro level the floor. I did this when I combined two bedrooms into one, and re-layed the 100 yr old fir floor to cover the missing wall seam.
I'll have to check Canadian prices for flooring. If it's not half price for the plywood then I'll go premanufactured.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:43 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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There is no question that the EZ equipment is up to the task of making flooring from plywood. It might even be cheaper but I still question the wisdom of making the flooring from plywood. The veneer is thin and edges may chip easily. I think it would be best to buy pre-made flooring. Now if you want to use solid oak or maple to make the flooring, I'm all for it.


Burt
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:28 PM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
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If I can source maple or oak sheets I will go forward.
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Old 11-17-2016, 06:04 AM
spencermoseley spencermoseley is offline
 
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Is plywood good?
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:32 AM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Don't know if you've moved forward on this but...

Unless your really into the rustic look, you may not be happy with plywood flooring. The veneer is very thin and will wear quickly. It can hold moisture and eventually separate or bubble.

Tongue and groove plywood is often used for underlayment because it's fairly strong and flat but not very aesthetic. Regardless of what you put over it, you need a sealer and moisture barrier on top of it. If left exposed, you'll need several coats of polyurethane or lacquer initially and another coat or two yearly.

Good luck!
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