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  #21  
Old 08-21-2016, 01:30 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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My 5007MGA was setup by EZ so it has their dust port and shield. I'd say it's about half as dusty (or maybe a little more) using a vac as it is without. So not at all dust free. I'm using a Fein vac, so a good vacuum. There is still a mess to clean up when you're done. With one side of the blade exposed, so the depth adjustment and blade guard can work, you just are not going to get the dust control that the eurosaws get with their fully enclosed blade.

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Originally Posted by kbaker6253 View Post
You're right. I must have been looking at an archived web site. What is your experience with dust collection on your Makita? Are you using the EZ shield/port or something else? Thanks.
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  #22  
Old 08-21-2016, 03:08 PM
philb philb is offline
 
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Default Blade - saw - issues

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Originally Posted by kbaker6253 View Post
Thanks Ken. I'll likely go with the 5007 unless someone here can convince me I need the bigger 5008. I probably won't be cutting anything thicker than 2x4s, and the 5007 is cheaper (blades too, and I'm "thrifty"). That, a couple of tracks, and the UEG should do to start. Any other suggestions? Thanks again.
I have watched the EZ Forum discussion on the depth of cut and angle depth of cut for a few years now. I do try to track to some degree the number of times depth of cut mattered. I am not a contractor so I do not come across everything imaginable. As a serious amateur for the last 16 years, I have built cabinets, furniture, gifts and a small number of oddball projects. Still, as a woodworker, I have yet to deal with depth of cut that the EZ products will not handle. I am sure with my limited exposure there are some things I miss that professionals will deal with. I would think though that since my first EZ purchase (in 2004 or 2006?), I would have hit at least one or two projects that my EZ tools would not meet the task at hand -- still I have not had one! Next week maybe? I would be interested to know some hard data, that tracks the number of times depth of cut is a big issue. I do have a Bosch 10" Double Bevel Slider saw. So many of my 2X stock is handled on that saw.

All of the above stated my be of limited use due to my narrow scope experience. Still it gives me the question of -- "how many beyond depth of cut tasks are woodworkers required to perform in a year?" If less than 5% of a woodworkers tasks are beyond the depth of cut capacity of the saw, then justification for a larger saw is limited. If 25% are out of capacity then the justifications are greater. I would love to hear more comments positive or negative on the need for greater depth of cut. It seems to me that most of us use the EZ for 2X lumber (1 1/2") or sheet goods 3/4" or thinner.

Can we have some input? This is a frequent question that new members are asking and putting the situation into perspective is certainly relevant.
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  #23  
Old 08-21-2016, 06:01 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Find yourself some kind of sacrificial surface for cutting. I bought the previously available "Smart Table" but find the current offerings kind of expensive for what is needed. Maybe you could just use a few saw horses, a sheet of plywood, and a sheet of thick foam?
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  #24  
Old 08-21-2016, 07:16 PM
kbaker6253 kbaker6253 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
Find yourself some kind of sacrificial surface for cutting. I bought the previously available "Smart Table" but find the current offerings kind of expensive for what is needed. Maybe you could just use a few saw horses, a sheet of plywood, and a sheet of thick foam?
I agree. The retail tables are too expensive for me. What kind of foam are you talking about? Where do you get it? The other thing I've been thinking of is a cross hatch of sacrificial 2x4s. Like a tic tac toe arrangement.
Thanks.
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  #25  
Old 08-22-2016, 12:23 AM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Some of the Festool guys like cutting on a sheet of foam, the 1-1/2" or 2" thick you buy at the home center. They believe that cutting on that solid surface helps with dust collection. Makes sense.
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  #26  
Old 08-22-2016, 11:58 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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After I retire - when I get to build my dream shop - I plan to build some kind of torsion box assembly/work table. I think I'll create some kind of removable sacrificial cross hatch surface for it made out of 3/4" material - either plywood or 1x4's.

Thinking about the joints I suppose you'd have to cut half-overlap slots in the pieces - like they do in cardboard packing inserts. IF the slots are tight enough you wouldn't even need to use nails or screws - just glue and clamp at 90 degrees so it looks decent - which removes concerns about hitting the screws with the blade.

I'm thinking that the 3/4" material would be light enough to lift but heavy enough not to slide easily across the table top.
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  #27  
Old 08-22-2016, 02:15 PM
kbaker6253 kbaker6253 is offline
 
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something like this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmGmMbMveOk
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  #28  
Old 08-22-2016, 09:37 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Here's my cutting grid, made out of strips of 3/4" plywood. I've also used it as an assembly table, building cabinets right on the grid with no tabletop - plenty of access for the clamps.

I've seen torsion box tops made from the same construction, with half-lap joints, but have a couple of articles showing one made with just but joints with the intersections stapled. It's too large to post @ 5.3 MB, if there's any interest I can print and scan the one page and post it.

Tom
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  #29  
Old 08-22-2016, 10:19 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Tom, you can zip it and attach the zip file.
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  #30  
Old 08-23-2016, 08:51 AM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Thanks Dik, great suggestion.

I zipped the file of the original article by Rosario Capotosto in Popular Mechanics back in 1987 because it's smaller, but it still won't let me send - the basic file is 3.38 MB, zipped only reduces to 3.22 MD and the max. allowable file size is 1.92 MB. I'll print out the couple of pages that shows the basic construction method and scan them as pdf and send just that part.

He uses hide glue to attach the skin to the grid, but a thread in another forum uses PL Premium as an alternate.

Tom
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