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  #21  
Old 11-12-2018, 10:38 PM
MHB MHB is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Jennings, LA
Posts: 19
Default +1 on the Makita

Quote:
Originally Posted by tofu View Post
Go with an actual track saw and matching track. You'll save headache in the long run. I personally use the Makita set, but DeWalt, festool and Bosch (if you import it) are also popular.

EZ may have something great in the pipe line, but with their current offering -- miters always need test cuts or jigs because the cut line will always change, dust collection requires saw modification, track edge always changes depending on how much pressure is on the wood.

Those caveats seem small when you are looking at $150-250 savings by going with a conventional CS, but a real track saw took my projects from "I'll get around to it" to "this will be fun."
+1 on the Makita
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  #22  
Old 11-18-2018, 01:47 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 483
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I like the EZ One with the Makita 5057KB 7-1/4" Fiber-Cement Circular Saw w/ Dust Collection best. It has excellent dust collection built in and is a stable saw that sits nice on the track. I also have the 5008 that I use for deeper cuts, and a 5007 that I got very cheap. Once the brackets come for the ueg, I plan to dedicate it to that. I did a couple of mods to the 5057, and you can find discussions of these on this site. Because dust collection was a priority, it was worth the money to get it, but I also like it better than the other Makitas for other reasons. I'd strongly recommend that whichever saw you get, make sure it has a brake.

I've also used the Makita track saw. European track saws do different things, and have some advantages over the EZ system, especially how easy it is to set the depth compared to the Makita circular saws, dust collection is better, and sometimes the flexible track that sticks to the wood is good. The makita track saw doesn't have a lot of accessories and modifying the system means building jigs for what you need. But mods are limited.

A big advantage with the EZ, is that you are buying into a system that includes many other things, routing possibilities with the SSRk and it is possible to make modifications more easily than with the track saw. Festool is a system, but with very pricey accessories, ridiculously pricey in most cases. I think their MFT is not as good by far as the EZ One. The one thing I do like about it is the hinged track. I like the EZ bridge much better, but it would be great to have an ez hinged track as an option.

There are pros and cons to each system, and you have to figure out your needs, both now and in the future. It's hard to do that when you are just starting out.

ADDED: I didn't make the post about the mods to the 5057, so if you search, I'm not the author.
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Last edited by Goblu; 11-18-2018 at 11:16 PM. Reason: clarification
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  #23  
Old 11-18-2018, 02:00 PM
Dino Dino is online now
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
Posts: 5,152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
There are pros and cons to each system, and you have to figure out your needs, both now and in the future. It's hard to do that when you are just starting out.
good post Katie.
I will take it one step further.

The Circular saw was invented by a lady? to cut sugar canes?
They named it Skill saw due to the fact that Skill was needed to use the saw.
You can easily have an accident and have an overdone
manicure or a main vain due to the kick-back and a guard
that was working at will. ( Nice name btw)
Later they saw the benefits and need for cutting wood and other materials.
+100? years later? they offer the same design to the public without any training or even good instructions.
In my view a 10-15 minutes mandatory training must be done to novices and
even the Pro's. In the Unions they do just that. Why not going to the local union and go over the basics? Like: Let the drop-off piece to drop?
Never cut between supports? Touch the wood and back-off the saw?
Never cut wood that can move? Simple and safe?

We all know the rest. Left blade VS right blade debates...
I was punished by promoting the Right for Right
and LEFT for left. The Tough guys like it their way and they want to see the blade spinning while I was promoting ways that the user don't have to
look at the blade but instead to be aware of space and conditions.
Until today I'm trying to find a better way that anyone can safely cut a 2x4".
I thing I got it now. Make the tool to work right and forget the Skill.
A self squaring-clamping -guiding-sliding ( captive) saw that eliminates most if not all accident scenarios.

The Front Plunge saws on the other hand was flooring saws.
First invented here in US and soon after in EU. Sounds familiar?
For the main reason of cutting the hardwood floors close to the walls.
A huge time saver in floor applications...
that later become the standard in Guide cutting in panels.
The Plunge action was Unique and the retraction of the blade was
marketed as a safer way...with dust collection...who can say not to that?


Limited time....
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  #24  
Old 11-18-2018, 02:39 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,260
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The name came from a woman.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Michel
And other than it has a spinning blade not exactly relevant to the modern CS.
And if you want to see some squirrely use of a CS watch a pro. Pining the guard back, holding wood on your leg to cut, cutting one handed while trying not to fall off a roof.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
good post Katie.
I will take it one step further.

The Circular saw was invented by a lady? to cut sugar canes?
They named it Skill saw due to the fact that Skill was needed to use the saw.
You can easily have an accident and have an overdone
manicure or a main vain due to the kick-back and a guard
that was working at will. ( Nice name btw)
Later they saw the benefits and need for cutting wood and other materials.
+100? years later? they offer the same design to the public without any training or even good instructions.
In my view a 10-15 minutes mandatory training must be done to novices and
even the Pro's. In the Unions they do just that. Why not going to the local union and go over the basics? Like: Let the drop-off piece to drop?
Never cut between supports? Touch the wood and back-off the saw?
Never cut wood that can move? Simple and safe?

We all know the rest. Left blade VS right blade debates...
I was punished by promoting the Right for Right
and LEFT for left. The Tough guys like it their way and they want to see the blade spinning while I was promoting ways that the user don't have to
look at the blade but instead to be aware of space and conditions.
Until today I'm trying to find a better way that anyone can safely cut a 2x4".
I thing I got it now. Make the tool to work right and forget the Skill.
A self squaring-clamping -guiding-sliding ( captive) saw that eliminates most if not all accident scenarios.

The Front Plunge saws on the other hand was flooring saws.
First invented here in US and soon after in EU. Sounds familiar?
For the main reason of cutting the hardwood floors close to the walls.
A huge time saver in floor applications...
that later become the standard in Guide cutting in panels.
The Plunge action was Unique and the retraction of the blade was
marketed as a safer way...with dust collection...who can say not to that?


Limited time....
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2018, 03:53 PM
Dino Dino is online now
Master Carpenter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
Posts: 5,152
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
The name came from a woman.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Michel
And other than it has a spinning blade not exactly relevant to the modern CS.
And if you want to see some squirrely use of a CS watch a pro. Pining the guard back, holding wood on your leg to cut, cutting one handed while trying not to fall off a roof.
Been there...did that. I framed entire buildings in NY ( HUD)
and maybe 15 new houses in NJ. Total rebuild on burn down houses.

Use the weight of the worm drive and the friendly inline handle...it was easy.
Framing....you have to cut the wood in place, Going to the miter saw every time...it cost double. To align for square -straight cuts...
you look at the parallel space at the end of the wood.
The pinning of the guard was only for bevel cuts and eaves.
The only good feature by luck was when you drop the saw with the guard
pinned...the saw actually travels away from your feet.
The bad issue was the dust cutting overhead and in any position.
Why they don't open the guard on the right place?
The answer: they don't have to use it...the designers.

For a Pro...If he can use the Worm drive saw for a full day without accident..
he's good to go. I believe the Boss will see with the first cut.
I end up with minor mod's.
Lift the guard with bicycle parts...( brake ) while lifting 2 pins the same time.
the pins was for squaring the saw in cuts where I wasn't able to hold the saw for long times square. I never looked at the blade.
The cut line indicator and the parallel look at the base and wood was much easier.
Now I have to include the above and more tricks to the base. Easy?

Dust with the left blade saws was hell. In your face.
I open the other side and use duct tape on the left...
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