The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > Display Case

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11  
Old 01-27-2014, 01:27 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cut2cut View Post
is your track attached to that sme? I dont see a bridge there????
How is the T track being used?
No, there is not a bridge. Maybe someday but at $265, I would get the SSRK before the bridge. The SME was originally intended to be used with some small pieces of "track connectors" on the underside of the track and some type of UHMW L block (on the SME) so that I could "clamp down" on my work piece". That never really got finished. The T-Track is basically used to hold the 2 front stop UHMW stop blocks in order to get a square cut. I also intend to make a "flip stop" so that I can get consistent lengths when creating "face frame pieces". The back to the EZ track is really just held in place by using a wood screw clamp and use clamping/friction force on top of a piece of 3/4" block to keep the back of the EZ track in place. (I need to tweak this part of the setup)
Really the system works quite well. The major shortcoming is not using a stop block for the "length" to get consistent crosscut lenghts (same problem you have on a miter gauge with a table saw).

Last edited by sdjsdj; 01-27-2014 at 01:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:07 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

sdjsdj,
couple of thoghts:

-I appreciate your approach re. how to do a project EZ-er, and, using only what you have to hand; that resonates with me.

-If I'm seeing/understanding correctly, you've allowed your EZ cutting track to be able to slide to whatever position you want it, yes? When I made a PBB, I made it so that I could also slide the cutting track to any position on the table. Whereas on the EZ-one, you bring the material to the cut-line, on a PBB w/sliding track, you can bring the cut-line to the material. Nice.

-re. routing for the frame-and-panel doors: Since you can slide the EZ track to anywhere on your PBB you want to, consider mounting the material to be routed on the side of your PBB and move the cutting track over to a position where the track is now a guide-edge for the router. (see the pics. Pic 3 shows the SSRK in use, but the principle, w/out the SSRK, is the same).
I use this option often on my PBB (ie. the mounting of stock to be milled, on the side of the PBB), since there's often no other EZ way to do it. If you do a bit of initial lay-out, you'll be able to quickly rout the tongues and grooves. (Since you'll be doing repetitive pieces, make a jig that quickly aligns each piece to be cut.)

-re. 'bridge': Until you can spring for the EZ bridge, consider doing some sort of variation like what I've shown in the pic. All you need is something that is attached to the bottom of the track, that allows you to raise and lower the track, and then clamp the 'raising-guide' snugly. In the pic, you can see that I'm using a milled piece (notice the twin slots) of HDPE for the raising guides, and I've milled another piece of HDPE for the bottom of the track. This 'track' piece is fastened to the raising guide, and is then snugged to the bottom of the track by a couple of screws thru them, pushing against the bottom of the track. You don't have to use HDPE- you can use wood. Instead of using the milled 'track' pieces, you can use a piece of 3/4" x 3/4" wood (screw the wood crossways onto the bottom of the track; screw the raising guides into the wood); or, you could use some 3/4" or 1/2" alum. angle. Also, you can attach your raising-guides w/bolts or screws into wood. (In my case, I'm using EZ track for the sides of my PBB.) Doing something like this still allows you to reposition the track on the top of the PBB, as well as being able to raise the track to account for different thickness materials.

HTH,
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	routing on edge of PBB.jpg
Views:	205
Size:	98.1 KB
ID:	5977   Click image for larger version

Name:	router on EZ track.jpg
Views:	195
Size:	100.6 KB
ID:	5978   Click image for larger version

Name:	PBB-  routing.jpg
Views:	193
Size:	99.7 KB
ID:	5979   Click image for larger version

Name:	bridge-  makeshift.jpg
Views:	219
Size:	93.2 KB
ID:	5980  

Last edited by bumpnstump; 01-27-2014 at 02:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:19 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Rick, thanks for the input. I will consider doing something similar. Part of the other "limitation" of my system, is that I only own one piece of track and it is 32". Hence I am using the UEG for all longer cuts. I do own 48" and a 96" tracks/guides but they are not EZ so nothing is "really trapped along the guide" and that of course tends to lead to inconsistencies.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:37 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

Go ahead and use the router table for the rail and style door. The bits you would need to do the door on the table can also be used with the SSRK. It took me years to totally replace everything with EZ. Make the most of what you have!! You'll find that the EZ equipment compliments traditional woodworking equipment very nicely.


Burt
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-27-2014, 02:48 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Burt View Post
Go ahead and use the router table for the rail and style door. The bits you would need to do the door on the table can also be used with the SSRK. It took me years to totally replace everything with EZ. Make the most of what you have!! You'll find that the EZ equipment compliments traditional woodworking equipment very nicely.


Burt
Doesn't that "disqualify me" from some type of "EZ Sweepstakes"
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-27-2014, 05:03 PM
Evan G Evan G is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 29
Default nice work

It looks like you got nice square repeatable cuts, because your face frame came out nicely. Were you happy with it?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-27-2014, 05:20 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan G View Post
It looks like you got nice square repeatable cuts, because your face frame came out nicely. Were you happy with it?
Yes, I am happy with it. The face frame was about 1/32" out of square, so I can do better next time. I have used pocket holes in the past (it's been about 3 years since I have done any woodworking), and when I assembled one of the corners, I did not line up the pieces properly. In my experience, you kind of only get one shot at the pocket screw assembly, once the holes are drilled there is not really any going back. Also, although all of my pieces were within 1/32" inch tolerance, next time I will use a stop block on my cutting station to give me "perfect length". Lastly making the face frame only 1 1/2" wide presented a bit of a challenge with putting 2 pocket screws next to each other, but I felt 2" was to wide for this small of a cabinet.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-28-2014, 02:13 PM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 298
Default

I hear you on the "one shot at it on the pocket holes" I watched a woodworker on Youtube use some plastic assembly squares along with a face clamp and it looked like a better method than what I have used -

http://www.rockler.com/clamp-it-assembly-square
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-28-2014, 02:22 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Yes, I have an aluminum version of those squares that I got at a woodworking show a few years back. Part of the goals of the whole projects was to "not spend any more money on tools", as well as "re-orienting" myself with the many steps required in woodworking to finish a pretty basic project.

Last edited by sdjsdj; 01-28-2014 at 02:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-28-2014, 02:36 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Upper Midwest
Posts: 32
Default

Project update. I have applied one coat of Minwax Naural Oak stain finish and a few coats of wipe-on poly to the insides and outside of the cabinet. I like the way it looks. I am very glad I did not use a darker stain. I have 2 boxes of Minwax stains that have been laying in the basement for at least 5 years, and they appear to work just fine.

Last night I used my EZ track and cutting station to cut out back panel out of 3/8" baltic birch that I had laying around. I am amazed at what a chip free cut I got when crosscutting and ripping.
Tonight I will paint the cabinet back using "kitchen/bath" semi-gloss white paint. That will allow light to reflect naturally in the cabinet. The back has a 1/8" deep rabbet and will be stapled on. It will also be used to "hang the unit on the wall".

I also priced out a custom piece of "double strength" glass for the door for about $15. So tonight I will be cutting the rails and stiles for the door using the same EZ methods that I used on the face frame. I am going to attempt to use "half lap joints" on for the door frame using a guide and my 18V Ryobi router. I need to rout away 3/8" x 1 1/2" of wood on 8 ends. I will use guides and clamps to "gang up" 4 at a time and will be making multiple passes with the router.

Lastly I need to rout a rabbet in the door for the glass and mortise out the areas for the hinges and install a door catch. I am planning on creating an inset door with about 1/4" clearance all the way around. This will be in a bathroom and although I have wiped on the "poly" I imagine there will be some wood swelling due to moisture.

Last edited by sdjsdj; 01-28-2014 at 02:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 04:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.