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Old 02-05-2014, 12:04 AM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Nowheresville, IL
Posts: 273
Default First "real" project with my EZ

I've done numerous things with my EZ equipment but this is the first furniture type thing I've done. A lot of firsts for me with this project shelf pins, edge banding etc.
My daughter needed a shelving unit of some kind for electronics so I started looking for plans & I came across the design confidential website which has a lot of free plans and I found one that I liked but by the time I got the project rolling I changed the plans quite a bit & ended up with something similar but different.
Here is the plans I started with: http://www.thedesignconfidential.com...t-top-bookcase

A single one of those units instead of three. As I was starting to plan the build I realized it would need to be slightly deeper and shorter and ultimately the bin at the bottom would be of little use to my daughter so I modified the plans, kind of just winged it really but I'm happy with the outcome.The top and bottom shelves are adjustable with shelf pins and the center is fixed to help with rigidity.
Unfortunately I didn't take a lot of "in progress" pics wasn't really thinking about that at the time. Here is some pics I do have, just cell phone pics sorry. The first shows some of the pocket holes & shelf pin holes.

The second just a pic of the front:

One of it in place:


It's made of 3/4" oak veneered plywood, oak 1x2's and a 1/4" sheet of ply on the back. There's no finish on it yet but I have very limited space to work right now and I had back surgery on Dec. 9th so I'm still pretty sore. Also ran out of edge banding. I live in Northern IL. & it's flipping freezing out right now!
The plan is to finish it with minwax "deep ocean" water based stain and some minwax polycrylic.
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Northern IL.
SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:09 AM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
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Location: Nowheresville, IL
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Default Minwax Deep Ocean test piece

Here's a picture of the "deep ocean" stain I read that some woods stain kind of blotchy but I have no idea which ones. So using a thinned down sealer I tried a test piece with far left, pre stain stuff center and nothing far right. I was most pleased with the far right since it gave better color absorption. I was worried this would end up looking like paint but the wood grain still shows through so it's not bad. The far right is the only one I put a second coat of stain on & it's got some of the polycrylic too. It looks quite nice in person but I had trouble getting the color to show up good in pictures.

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Mark R.
Northern IL.
SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2014, 01:33 AM
philb philb is offline
 
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Posts: 149
Default Resin is the problem

Wood like pine can be splotchy. The problem is the pitch or resin, in the wood. You can experience big difference with the cut. Quartersawn will take stain a bit differently than plain sawn. The pre stain sealer really helps the most on the end grain, which sucks up the stain and darkens considerably. The pre stain will help more with keeping the stain more even across the different surfaces.

I think that finishing is a whole craft unto itself and I sure have had a tough time getting the finish that I want. So I would say that by no means am I any sort of authority on the subject. The comment above are just what my personal experience has been.

BTW, that is a nice looking case you have crafted.
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Old 02-05-2014, 11:32 AM
Evan G Evan G is offline
 
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Nice job. I've used grain filler for oak, and liked the results. The grain filler can be easily thinned. It doesn't look good unstained, but it takes the stain well. The effect on oak, which is very open-grained is that you will see the grain pattern well, but the surface will be smoother.
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:16 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
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Location: Upper Midwest
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Very nice job. I just finished my first EZ furniture project this last weekend and am very pleased with the results. Just need to save some $$ to buy the SSRK.

Just a note. I created my edge banding using my UEG and Dewalt thickness planer. It was consistently 3/8" thick and I am very pleased with the look. I am not saying "you did it wrong", just saying creating your own edge banding out of solid wood is an option using the EZ system( the thickness planer does help to make a nice flat edge for the gluing surface)

Last edited by sdjsdj; 02-05-2014 at 12:20 PM.
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:17 PM
cut2cut cut2cut is offline
 
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Posts: 28
Default care

I have stained alot with the water based finishes.

Just be aware of the short working time for the water stains on large panels. You have to move real fast to get in on and rubbed off and have it look even.

I think that the water poly is fine for your application as it shouldnt get alot of wear. On high use items like kitchen tables they wear kinda fast.

looks good.
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Old 02-05-2014, 12:39 PM
sdjsdj sdjsdj is offline
 
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Location: Upper Midwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan G View Post
Nice job. I've used grain filler for oak, and liked the results. The grain filler can be easily thinned. It doesn't look good unstained, but it takes the stain well. The effect on oak, which is very open-grained is that you will see the grain pattern well, but the surface will be smoother.
Good tip on the grain filler. I forgot that I used that stuff on projects in my "pre-EZ" days. I mixed some up, thinned it out, put in on with a plastic putty knife and then "scraped it off across the grain". Wait for it to dry and then do a very light sanding. Really helps keep the finish smooth. Thanks for the reminder.
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  #8  
Old 02-05-2014, 09:35 PM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
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Location: Nowheresville, IL
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First I appreciate the kind words. I've really got almost no experience other than building speaker boxes, no shop class & no family members who do woodworking. Just watching youtube videos and Diy network and such. So I'm sure I'm not the most efficient when it comes to layout and going about stuff. I did use the cutlist program to layout my cuts to try & minimize the waste.

In fact I think I have enough left over to make her a cd/dvd stand she can put next to the big one.
I appreciate the tips too! I'm a bit nervous about doing the large panels with the water based stain it only has a 3 min. working time and right now the wood is absorbing it faster than that it almost dries in that time.

Question about the grain filler. Do you skim coat the whole piece?

I couldn't agree more with you Phil about finishing being a craft in & of itself! I'm really nervous about screwing it up lol. At least with speaker cabinets I'm usually doing black & it's usually truck bed liner which covers up a lot of stuff.
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Mark R.
Northern IL.
SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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  #9  
Old 02-05-2014, 10:10 PM
Evan G Evan G is offline
 
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I learned about grain filler in a finishing book that I got from the local library. I've applied it like a drywall skim coat with a plastic scraper, then sand off, then stain. Charles Neil is good at finishing things. A search for charles neil grain filler on youtube brings up this video. He's using a brush and rag to apply it and mixing stain in ahead of time. You might have to experiment with it. I ended up sanding too much off the first time I used it.
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  #10  
Old 02-05-2014, 10:23 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Nicely done project! Thanks for posting.


Burt
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