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  #11  
Old 08-09-2014, 10:27 AM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
So, refer to the plans 4 times, convert to imperial 3 times, measure twice, cut once, or something like that.
Lol , I might be in real trouble then! Thanks for answering about the extensions. I'm looking into getting my EZ stuff more organized. This is one option that appeals to me since it basically folds up and reduces the overall footprint when not in use. Sadly I don't have a "shop" just a very cramped basement.
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SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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  #12  
Old 08-10-2014, 09:37 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vondoom88 View Post
Lol , I might be in real trouble then! Thanks for answering about the extensions. I'm looking into getting my EZ stuff more organized. This is one option that appeals to me since it basically folds up and reduces the overall footprint when not in use. Sadly I don't have a "shop" just a very cramped basement.
Limited shop space is the reason I'm making this, too. I always laugh when I see the articles about "the small shop" in woodworking magazines, then it looks enormous to me. When I think "small shop space" I think something like a converted walk-in closet attached to a bedroom . You know, something like a workbench that folds in and out of the wall like a murphy bed.
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  #13  
Old 08-19-2014, 11:50 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Default Making a somewhat heavier unit works for my situation.

I've gotten much of this done except for the pull-out shelves/drawers. I'm happy with the results. I've used it a bit in its somewhat unfinished state. One thing is that it's high enough that my back immediately felt better. I will post pictures and comment on specifics later, but wanted to note possible changes related to weight while it is fresh in my mind.

Note that I'm not making this to be super light and frequently transportable to various worksites. I wanted something compact, foldable, storable to fit flexibly in a small space. Not too heavy, but lightness was not as important for me as for the designer of the plan.

First, I'd make the legs out of something other than pine. Perhaps poplar or even maple. These legs will get a lot of clamping, folding, etc. and I don't like that they are denting. I used fairly straight grain 2x4's but there is some warp. The pine is very light, of course, but the legs were a lot of work and I want them to hold up. Though the back ones will be simple to switch out in the future. I normally wouldn't use construction grade pine for anything but construction, but I wanted to get started. I'm going to use a spar varnish finish to help protect them.

Second, I find the small shelf that fits underneath to be a bit flimsy. It's made of 1/4" ply with a small frame around it and I'm probably not going to drill holes in it. Too flimsy. When I replace it, I'll just make a shelf with no frame out of a flat piece of 1/2" plywood and make some holes to fit over the tenons (dowels could be used) to hold it and keep the table stable, plus I'll drill some of those dog holes in it. Again, it is nice and lightweight but not necessary for those who aren't doing a lot of transporting.

Third, the drawers. The drawers are just 1/2" ply shelves with low fronts attached and runners for sides. Basically they are pull out shelves with a lip and cutouts in the bottoms. I'm not going to use the cutout pattern for the drawers since they were designed for systainers and I'm using Bosch L-Boxxes and some other containers. I may decide do do some smaller cutouts later if dust buildup is a big problem. But I like the idea of solid drawers because I can use them as extra shelves if that seems convenient and put a pair of pliers or some boxes of screws on them, not possible with the cutouts. This makes them more flexible, though somewhat heavier. I did finish one of the pull-out shelves (photo). This one is not intended to have a case on it, just extra top space to put things if needed (kudos to JGowrie). The others will look like this one but will hold cases.

Non of these changes would make them super heavy and I'm not lugging a bunch of tools onto worksites in them, so it would be fine.
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Last edited by Goblu; 08-20-2014 at 11:10 AM.
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  #14  
Old 08-20-2014, 12:17 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Default A few pitfalls

I thought I'd post a few pitfalls. I'll add to this post if I find more.

The biggest source of these problems for me was changing the dimensions and at the same time converting from imperial to metric. I wanted it to fit the Bosch LBoxx system (instead of the systainers) so I made it wider and I decided to make the tops 4'x8' since this is standard and I had some SME extrusions that were 8' and cutting a few inches off each one seemed a pain and a waste.

Total novice at metric, here. Now I'm a fan, though because it is a far superior system, more exact, easier to add, subtract, etc. But a pain learning while changing dimensions on what, for me, is a complicated plan. The plans come sized for imperial plywood sizes but the actual parts are all metric.

Because things have to fit together and pivot, it's tricky to figure it all out if you change dimensions. Maybe not for an experienced woodworker, but I'm still treading water in the novice end of the pool.

I ended up making my first top too narrow for the carcase. It will become a somewhat narrower extension table with a few additions of parts. Measure carefully and adjust to fit once the carcase is finished, just like you would with drawer widths.

I also made the underneath shelf too wide. It doesn't fit neatly in the space when folded up. No big deal for me, but the shelf won't store properly. Photo one shows where you should measure to fit if you change the overall width of the plan.

Measure the leg connector boards to fit without binding. My first extension table binds slightly. No biggie, though.

For the cart where you make the leg connectors attach to the legs is important I changed the top connector because the mortise for the hinges was too deep and I wanted more wood to hold the top connector (second photo). So instead of the top connector being flush with the outside of the legs, I made it flush with the inside. This worked fine. But, when I did the same with the middle leg connector, it would not fold up completely. So this should be flush with the outside of the legs when the table is set up (third photo). I changed it with not too much stress, though. Just drilled through the dowels and used pocket hole screws to fix it. See pictures below.

For the extension table leg connectors I made the reinforcing boards taller than called for. Again, I thought it would make a stronger table since weight was not a factor. Oops, the taller boards obstructed the legs, so I had to change that. Somewhat ugly fix for this. Luckily I assembled the first one and found my mistake early. The second one was a breeze.

Most of this was easily remedied, but took extra time. A few other pitfalls in other sections, later.
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Last edited by Goblu; 08-20-2014 at 11:03 AM.
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  #15  
Old 08-20-2014, 11:28 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Default Attaching extrusions

Instead of adding an extra piece of 1/4" plywood and insetting conventional t-track as the plans call for, I am using SME extrusions so I can attach a bridge or other EZ accessories. The first photo shows the 24" SME extrusions on the end attached. I haven't bolted on the two side 48" SMEs yet. I want to permanently attach the top first.

The plans call for having a 1/2" lip to fit the 1/2" mdf top into. With my measurements, the SME works perfectly to do that. Photo two shows a piece of 1/2" plywood that is my temporary top.

Here's what I did. I routed a series of 1/4" holes 3/4" from the top of the 3" plywood top frame. I did this before putting the frame together. Then I assembled the frame with pocketholes.

Then I drilled the extrusion in the center to match the holes. Hard to match them up using a marking pen, and one went in at an angle . Photo three shows mismatched holes and crooked bolt. Photo four is a shot of the inside showing the attachment of the frame. So, for the other end, I clamped the extrusion to the frame and just drilled through the wood frame holes to put a divot in the correct place, a good deep divot or even a small hole. Then I drilled through the SME. All these holes were correctly positioned. photo five shows this clamping. The sme is backwards.

Since there is a small groove that runs the length of the inside of the SME, it is perfect to be able to hit the center of the extrusion through the holes in the plywood.

Better method: What I plan to do for the second top is to drill the top ply sides and end as described, then drill the holes in the SMEs before before assembling the plywood top frame. This will be easier.

PS I don't usually use so many pocket holes, but this was badly warped ply (photo 3).
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Last edited by Goblu; 09-01-2014 at 11:39 PM.
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  #16  
Old 08-20-2014, 08:30 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Default SME cutting and drilling

Since this is the defining feature of making this cart in the EZ version, I wanted to give some more photos/details of the process. The bolts are 1/4-20 1 1/2" round head bolts. The nuts are lock nuts for those bolts and 1" fender washers for the wood side only.


First pic shows drilling through the pre-routed hole in the plywood table top to make a divot. These routed holes are spaced 3/4" from the top. If you drill through the center of the SME it gives the right spacing for a 1/2" lip as shown above.

The second pic shows a good sized divot and the center groove in the SME. Third one shows the holes drilled. Coffee can is for aluminum bits. Sharp little devils I try to contain in my workspace.

Next two pics show how I cut the SME's. There was an inquiry about this recently and some good advice was given about safeguards (face mask for eye and face protection, long sleeved shirt, disconnect dust collection to avoid fires when cutting metal, and more). I also wear a good dusk mask because I DON'T want to inhale aluminum dust.

The fourth picture shows cutting the SME using a Rockwell blade Runner. This is a really great solution since the good Bosch aluminum jigsaw blades are cheaper than circ saw blades, etc. I found that this gives a cut identical to the cut on the other end as it arrived from eurekazone. Pic five shows the quality of the cut ends after the cut. This does generate a lot of fine aluminum dust, so I'll repeat the warning about wearing a dust mask. Along with other equipment.

I keep the shirt, face mask and dust mask stored in a handy plastic tub so they are ready to go for cutting metal and no temptation to bypass them. Also aluminum cutting oil for tap and drill operations.

I really like the Bladerunner. On sale about $100 and I use it all the time. For a small shop with no big bandsaw it allows for some of those operations.
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Last edited by Goblu; 08-20-2014 at 08:50 PM.
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  #17  
Old 08-22-2014, 07:43 PM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
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Looking good!! Are you planning on doing the top with holes all in it like the festool ?
I watched a video on those Parf dogs & they seem pretty cool plus the way you can do a quick 90 cut etc. no bridge.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rX8j-eCz5Og
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SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2014, 01:21 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Thanks for the link, Mark. Very handy video to see the many ways to use the table with holes in the top. Those parf dogs are beautiful. I love well-designed and well-machined things like that. They are reasonably priced, too.

I do plan to make the top with the holes in it, but still haven't decided on some of the details. The plans call for 1/2" mdf, but that just seems too flimsy for the dogholes. I'm thinking of making a top with holes for one of the extension tables instead, and using thicker mdf. Also, I was thinking of using 3/4" dog holes, rather than the metric 20mm ones. For one thing, I already have the router bits for that. But the parf dogs are tempting, I'll admit. And MDF does dull the bits, so maybe a dedicated bit makes sense.

Then I want to make a jig that is very exact. I've seen various plans for that, but something I could use with the SSRK would be ideal. Then there's not much to it, but making the jig will take some time. If I make a really good jig, the process is easily repeatable and I won't balk at using it as a sacrificial surface, since MDF is so cheap.

Still thinking it over. For now, that rough plywood top is what I'll use on the cart since I have it. The first one is almost done, still needs a final finish and some drawers, the second one is a bit further behind, but I'm still working out the shop space for it.

ETA, I don't think you could just use them with the ez track and no bridge. The festool track demonstrated has a sticky bottom strip that "holds" it to the workpiece. You'd have to clamp the ez track using smart clamps, but they could be used for alignment. I'm interested in them as stops/for fences, for routing, etc.
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Last edited by Goblu; 08-24-2014 at 01:40 AM.
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  #19  
Old 08-24-2014, 10:29 AM
Vondoom88 Vondoom88 is offline
 
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This may be helpful for converting the metric measurements, I forgot I had this little program. The IT guy at work turned me onto it a few years back. Works with windows I tried to find the guys site but I get a 502 bad gateway error everytime so I busted out the wayback machine & found a snapshot of his site with a working doanload link.

https://web.archive.org/web/20140822...t-for-windows/
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Mark R.
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SGS 64" W/ Miter square. Ripsizer, SSRK, B-100 & STK 36", 24" tracks & a EZ-One ...... so far + a UEG!!
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  #20  
Old 08-25-2014, 12:35 PM
Mad Mac Mad Mac is offline
 
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Default Handyman calculator for Smart Phone

This is a great convertor for mm to inches and a whole lot more to use with your Smart phone.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...mberCalc&hl=en

mac
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