The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > Display Case

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-14-2016, 10:45 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default scrap wood table

Had a stack of reclaimed D-YP (D-grade; Yellow Pine) 1 x's that weren't really good for much, other than burning, or tossing in the trash, so I decided to 're-purpose' them into something useful: a 'scrap-wood-table'.

Due to the amount of wood and the lengths available, making a straight-plank top wasn't going to work, so I decided to try my hand at a round top, made up of radians. Since this was not really intended to be a show-piece of furniture, I wasn't worried if it came out less than 'perfect'.

Next was to figure out how many radians I needed. In this instance, 24 radians, @ 15˚ seemed best. (To figure the degrees of each radian, divide the 360˚ of the circle by the # of radians: 360˚ 24 = 15˚) A quick setup on the EZ-1 to cut the radians, and I was off to the races.

After all of the pieces were cut, I used the biscuit joiner to cut biscuit slots for biscuits to align the radians, and drilled pocket holes to hold it together. (Pics 1 & 2.)

After joining all of the radians, I set up to rout the circle. In the pics, you can see that the center of the radians is not the center of the table- that is by design, and due to the lengths of available wood (we'll call it an 'artistic element'......).

Using the SSRK for circular routing is really nice. Because my radius was a bit longer than the SSRK track portion allowed, I joined another small piece of track to it. (Pics one and two) In the first pic, you can see I joined the extra track using, a) a piece of EZ connector in the middle of the track; b) an 8mm alum. dowel in the track side groove. The alum. dowel is tapped for allen screws to hold it in place and help stiffen the two tracks. Pic two shows the beginning of the routing process.

Pic three shows a 'stiffener' that I added near the outer edge of the table top. After I glued, nailed, and screwed it in place, I routed it using the SSRK to allow the table top to overhang 1/2". Pic 4 shows where I've gotten to at this point: top is routed w/outer edge stiffener attached and routed; I still need to install center stiffening, as well as add legs.

It might be a while before I finish the base/legs portion: other projects are demanding my time. But, I think you get the idea. Overall, I'm pleased at how this 'scrap-wood-table' is shaping up; I'd rather something like this instead of tossing the wood in the trash bin.
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2995.jpg
Views:	192
Size:	103.9 KB
ID:	6849   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2996.jpg
Views:	203
Size:	102.8 KB
ID:	6850   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2997.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	103.7 KB
ID:	6851   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2998.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	99.8 KB
ID:	6852  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-15-2016, 09:16 AM
redoleary redoleary is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Battle Creek MI
Posts: 43
Default

Brilliant! That came out really nice, thanks for sharing.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-15-2016, 01:02 PM
roy_okc roy_okc is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Moore, OK
Posts: 247
Default

Rick,

That is a really nice table. I like how the 'center is not the center'.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-15-2016, 01:10 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is online now
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Evans, GA
Posts: 1,601
Default

Rick,

I really like it. I have some reclaimed pine that was made into flooring, that I have been using to make casings and trim for the rooms in which I was going to use it as flooring until I gave it closer inspection and found I really didn't have enough. I'll keep this in mind for when I have finished the rooms, if I have any left over.
__________________
Have fun...

Dik Harrison
Former Consultant to EurekaZone

Blog
YouTube
SketchUp Models
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-15-2016, 07:01 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Thanks, guys! It's all fun. The EZ equipment makes doing this sort of project straightforward: one setup on the EZ-1 to cut all of the tapered pieces, and the SSRK for circular routing. I spent part of today milling the legs from an ancient pine beam I had in the shed- the UEG really paid for itself.
I'll post a finished pic when I complete it.
Rick
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-16-2016, 07:04 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 224
Default

Very cool! Anxious to see the finished product. Biscuits and pocket holes? It's not going to fall apart on you.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-16-2016, 09:32 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
Very cool! Anxious to see the finished product. Biscuits and pocket holes? It's not going to fall apart on you.
Well, I couldn't think of any other way to hold it together w/out spending tons of unnecessary time (think: dowels or splines).

Pic one shows the legs and apron; pic two shows the underside of the table top. The ply piece does a couple of things: a) screwing thru the ply into each radian helps hold everything in place. The radians are not glued to each other- since this table might end up on the covered deck, it will be affected by humidity, and I wanted it to be able to expand/contract easily; b) the ply is cut to snugly fit into the leg/apron space. When the legs are set in place, the ply helps support the legs; c) on the top side (pic 3), I plan on insetting another ~5" diam. circle, right where the radians come together. It's almost impossible to have 24 pointy pieces of wood meet exactly at a center point. To 'cover' this, I could have drilled out the center and put in a dowel, but that seemed a bit too pathetic, even for me... . Instead, I'll make a contrasting circle to go there, held up underneath by the ply. (I thought about using tile or glass, but.... not this time.) Having the ply on the underside will give me a platform to hold this 5" insert.
....progress.....
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3003.jpg
Views:	163
Size:	107.4 KB
ID:	6853   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3007.jpg
Views:	172
Size:	99.7 KB
ID:	6854   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3011.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	101.9 KB
ID:	6855  

Last edited by bumpnstump; 05-16-2016 at 09:42 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-17-2016, 08:50 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 224
Default

Well, I really like the pie pieces! Most of us would have made a square top or joined the boards straight, then cut a circle out of them. Very imaginative!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-17-2016, 09:09 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
Well, I really like the pie pieces! Most of us would have made a square top or joined the boards straight, then cut a circle out of them. Very imaginative!
Thanks! It is so simple to set up the EZ-1 to do this kind of work, I may incorporate this theme in other pieces. I'm learning a lot while building this; my wife is already talking about a 'nice' one that could go in the house....

I was inspired to try this a couple of months ago when I happened into an art gallery. In the foyer was a stunningly beautiful, rectangular table made of reclaimed long leaf pine. Even tho the table was rectangular, the craftsman had made the top out of radian pieces, w/the center of the radians off-center to the table top, and incorporating well-placed circular, and narrow-but-straight, inlays for accents. A real jaw dropper. As I was looking at it, I was calculating the amount of work he must have put into making the radians and inlays..... lots; so, I thought about going thru the motions to build this 'scrap-wood' version. Glad I did- it's taken a bit of the mystique out of the process.
Rick
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-27-2016, 11:13 PM
Jeff Freelove Jeff Freelove is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Round Rock, Texas
Posts: 147
Default Thanks for sharing

Rick,

Very nice! Excellent use of scrap pine.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 04:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.