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Old 01-27-2015, 12:34 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lexington, Ky
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Default dimensioning lumber

While we have a break from cold weather, I've jumped into replacement of my back deck. The main framing is being made out of 2x6 pressure treated. Even tho I'm using #1 grade lumber, the width's vary from 5 1/2" to 5 13/16", w/most being close to 5 5/8"+. Also, some have negligible crown; others have very pronounced crown. I realize that this is typical for off-the-shelf dimensional lumber.

I've found, tho, that I do a better job when all of my material is milled exactly alike. So, I decided to give my lumber the "EZ-treatment".

After sighting each board and marking the crown, I fastened the EZ track to the board w/EZ clamps, using indexing stops on the track for quick alignment. Run the saw; now the board is straight-line ripped on the top side. Then, I removed the track, flipped the board and ripped it with the ripsizer. Now the board is dimensioned. (I wanted 5 1/2" to be my final dimension, so that is what the ripsizer was set to.) Finally, I ran a 1/8" round-over router bit along the cut edges (minimizes splinters) and stacked the board; ready for the next one.

While it sounds like a lot of work, I was surprised at how quickly it went- 3-3.5 minutes, on average, for each board. Initially, I was only going to do the 10 boards that make up the main beams, but they turned out so well that I decided to do all of the joists also. It only took a couple of hours, total, for everything, and the results are beautiful, and much nicer to work with. I've used this technique before for salvaging used lumber, and it always gives me good results. Next, I'll be using it to reclaim the 60+ deck boards that were removed from the original deck. I can't imagine doing this with a table saw?

Here's a short video of the procedure:

http://vid1176.photobucket.com/album...re/ripping.mp4

Rick
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:39 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Rick,

Great little instructional video. Great idea, I too would rather work with uniform lumber, but I never thought to do them all at once.

Looks like you could use a slightly higher set of saw horses. Bending like that would kill my back...
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  #3  
Old 01-27-2015, 02:36 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dik Harrison View Post
Rick,

Great little instructional video. Great idea, I too would rather work with uniform lumber, but I never thought to do them all at once.

Looks like you could use a slightly higher set of saw horses. Bending like that would kill my back...
Thanks, Dik. Sometimes, back to basics is all that's needed.

re. sawhorse height: I actually do have a higher set for when needed. Since I'm vertically challenged, this shorter set (24") works well for me. When I am working with larger, heavier wood, and multiple pieces, I'd rather have the sawhorses lower, so I don't have to lift the wood so high; specially nice if I need to pick up and flip some of them. For my smallish stature and limited strength, it helps me to 'be on top' of the work instead of feeling like the wood is on top of me. I can understand re. the back: when I'm using the sawhorses as a platform for welding (plate steel across them for a worktop), then their shortness does work a number on my back.
Rick
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:15 PM
Tmyoung Tmyoung is offline
 
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Default PT?

it's hard to tell from the vid. but you started post with "The main framing is being made out of 2x6 pressure treated." Is that what you are trimming? If so you just cut off the layer that is pressure treated. Did you re-coat the newly cut parts and also the ends. I often repair decks that have had the treated layer of the lumber cut off. The treated layer is very that deep.
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:14 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Tmyoung View Post
it's hard to tell from the vid. but you started post with "The main framing is being made out of 2x6 pressure treated." Is that what you are trimming? If so you just cut off the layer that is pressure treated. Did you re-coat the newly cut parts and also the ends. I often repair decks that have had the treated layer of the lumber cut off. The treated layer is very that deep.
Good observation.

Couple of things in my favor:

-I'm using ground contact MCA (.15 PCF; some good info: http://fortresswood.com/pdf's/sfpa-p...14-guide.pdf);

-All top surfaces of framing, and, all joist hanger-to-wood surfaces will have Vycor Deck Protector (https://grace.com/construction/en-us...Deck-Protector) This should suffice to protect the tops of boards that were cut;

-The entire deck will have a polycarbonate covering, helping with minimizing/negating moisture at penetrations and end-cuts (http://www.hfmfgcorp.com/multi-wall-panels/);

-Fasteners used are hot-dipped galvanized, stainless, and Splitstop ACQ rated fasteners (https://www.splitstop.com:4433/products/star.asp MCQ is not as caustic as ACQ, so they should do ok).

It seems, w/the 'new' pressure treated woods, it's often not advisable to even build a deck, due to the potential 'pitfalls' of using these newer pressure-treated formulas- I thought long and hard about just pouring concrete.... I'm hoping that my forethought to longevity will pay off (mainly, the Vycor and the deck cover); if not, I'll be pouring concrete sometime in the future..... lol.

Thanks for pointing out the issues with pressure treated lumber- I was so focused on the straight-line ripping and dimensioning, I didn't even think about it.
Rick
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Old 04-29-2015, 12:54 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Nice indexing stops. Did you make them?

Also, thanks for the great video! Very informative.
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Old 04-29-2015, 03:44 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
Nice indexing stops. Did you make them?

Also, thanks for the great video! Very informative.
Thanks, Katie.

The indexing stops are my 'mini-repeaters'. The pic shows one black one (on the left) set up for indexing under the track; the other black one (on the right) is set up for indexing wood that is wider than the track. I used both black ones in the video, set up to index under the track. The white HDPE is the same as the black, showing a 3/4" HDPE routed out 1/2" deep on one edge; this edge is what indexes along the side of the EZ track. The bolt is a 1/4-20 carriage bolt that had it's head modified w/an angle grinder. The 1/2" baltic birch on the edge of the track is a wooden version of the plastic mini-repeater.
Rick
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Old 04-30-2015, 06:06 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Very cool!
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