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  #21  
Old 03-06-2012, 03:42 AM
Burt Burt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
If it is the one I looked at the other night (why can't these be left bladed), it has some blade mounting issue (thought missing bolt or something). But I am not sure if these are tool less, or what for blade changing.
Allen wrench. Should be on the back of the saw

Burt
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  #22  
Old 03-06-2012, 03:50 AM
spicyguy2005 spicyguy2005 is offline
 
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Burt:

I put in thin kerf Diablo blade. I think you are right. It seems like it need some additional piece to lock the blade in place. I didn't try to find the solution because I think the condition of the saw is pretty rough. With current price may be it would be worth trying to fix it. I think broken base plate may not be an issue after smart base is attached.

Supote
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  #23  
Old 03-06-2012, 10:01 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Thanks for the input, don't think I get it...
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  #24  
Old 03-06-2012, 10:54 AM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Dik, I'd just keep an eye on e-Bay, these saws do seem to come up with some regularity, just do a search for "Hilti Saw" to narrow your results.

A reminder to those interested, we are discussing the Hilti WSC 267-E saw designed specifically for Hilti. There are other Hilti saws out there (WSC-167, WSC-7.25), but these are knock-off Porter Cable and Makita saws, and Do Not have the same level of quality and features of the 267. Just an FYI....
Have a Great Day!!
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Tom
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  #25  
Old 03-06-2012, 11:12 AM
Bruce M Bruce M is offline
 
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Tom, I've enjoyed your posts on the Hilti - thanks for providing all the info. Probably the last I should be spending money on is another saw, but it didn't stop me from looking into the Hilti on-line. There's another one they offer in addition to the ones you mentioned - the WSC 70 - which takes a bigger blade and runs at higher RPM. I don't see any of their saws selling new in the US tho. I'm hoping Dino continues with his plan to offer an EZ-compatible saw that has a lot of the strengths of the Hilti. Bruce
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  #26  
Old 03-06-2012, 11:22 AM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Bruce M View Post
Tom, I've enjoyed your posts on the Hilti - thanks for providing all the info. Probably the last I should be spending money on is another saw, but it didn't stop me from looking into the Hilti on-line. There's another one they offer in addition to the ones you mentioned - the WSC 70 - which takes a bigger blade and runs at higher RPM. I don't see any of their saws selling new in the US tho. I'm hoping Dino continues with his plan to offer an EZ-compatible saw that has a lot of the strengths of the Hilti. Bruce
I very much agree with you Bruce! I'm sure Dino will release some very nice saws. In the mean time, I just wanted to use the best saw available for my EZ tasks, in this case it meant going out and buying a discontinued, $350 circular saw

It's too bad the design of circular saws has deteriorated so much. Not to say the build quality is rubbish. Quite the contrary, the Makita saws for instance are nicely built saws that seem to last a long time, the problem is that they are designed specifically as framing and rafter saws, and are not well suited to track saw use. What attracted me to the Hilti saw is that it was designed from the out set as a track saw, and thus benefits from tighter tolerances and greater stability.

If your current saw is working for you I don't see a reason to change, I just ran into a few situations where the Hilti worked best and so I'm going to stick with it.

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Tom
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  #27  
Old 03-07-2012, 03:40 AM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Are the European models, the same hertz (I think is the term, long day, real tired), or cycles as the US ones?
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  #28  
Old 03-07-2012, 10:34 AM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
Are the European models, the same hertz (I think is the term, long day, real tired), or cycles as the US ones?
I think you meant frequency - looks like my Hilti is 60Hz:

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  #29  
Old 03-07-2012, 01:17 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
Are the European models, the same hertz (I think is the term, long day, real tired), or cycles as the US ones?
Many European tools are 220V versus our North American 110V standard.
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  #30  
Old 03-08-2012, 12:40 AM
Jim Pierson Jim Pierson is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
Are the European models, the same hertz (I think is the term, long day, real tired), or cycles as the US ones?
Randal,

The 267 is an americanized version, hence the 60hz (cycles) if what I understood correctly from previous discussion in this thread. My experience living in Europe and the Middle East is that the 220V stuff is all 50hz. We used a transformer to drop 220V to 110V, and if you modify a plug to go male-to-male, then you can also run a transformer backward to go from 110V to 220V. The source power frequency doesn't change. So what will happen is that a 220V saw run from a backward transformer would run faster in the US. The opposit is true if you run a motor designed for 60hz at 50hz, it runs slower. So it isn't a good idea to plug in a clock that uses an electric motor to operate. This could be a safety problem for saws since the motors on the saws are designed to run at a specific RPM based on the size of the blade it is designed to spin.
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