The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > Track System Power Tools and Dust Collection

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-07-2017, 09:57 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 194
Default Reusing EZ Base on different saw

So I traded out my old Skil saw for an old Makita saw.

I have to get a decent blade, but I also have to reuse the previous EZ Base.

I have some ideas on what to try, but I figure I should ask here first to see anyone who might already have a good technique or some suggestions. Seems like the fin might be a good alignment point, since it doesn't work at all with the one setup with supplied spacers.

I am open to suggestions on the best choice blade. I have seen reference to Diablo 40T and some have said "full kerf" But when I look up DIablo there are different kinds of 40T. COnstruction, Finishing, etc. etc.

I have a relatively new 140 Plywood blade, but I have seen that people here discourage anything over 60T.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-07-2017, 11:16 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,214
Default

Measure from the blade to the slot in the base with a pair of dial calipers, make the numbers the same. Easy.
Some like full thickness blades but they sure make a lot of sawdust. Buy the 40T Diablo at HD, it should work fine. If you don't like it try something else, personal preference. I like the super thin kerf Matsushita but they aren't cheap and don't work well dull.
Isn't the 140T plywood blade you have HS steel instead of carbide? Use carbide.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-07-2017, 11:22 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 194
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Measure from the blade to the slot in the base with a pair of dial calipers, make the numbers the same. Easy.
So it doesn't matter how far as long as it is the same?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Some like full thickness blades but they sure make a lot of sawdust. Buy the 40T Diablo at HD, it should work fine. If you don't like it try something else, personal preference. I like the super thin kerf Matsushita but they aren't cheap and don't work well dull.
Isn't the 140T plywood blade you have HS steel instead of carbide? Use carbide.
Pretty sure the 140 is HSS
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-08-2017, 02:42 AM
philb philb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 153
Default The right blade

Absinthe: I am a self proclaimed blade expert. My daughter and I had a tool sharpening and tool repair business. I recommend Popular Tools saw blades. We no longer sell blades as I have retired. Be advised, the blades are not cheap, but you are not buying Fort Knox either.
In the 7.25" size blade, I would recommend a 40 tooth, full kerf, HATB, carbide blade. The HATB stands for High Alternating Bevel. The bevel is 30deg (which is an acute angle) and has a full flat face The only other option would be a Triple Chip in the same brand. The triple chip is not as smooth a cut as a HATB blade. Popular Tools or Tenryu are my favorites. You will spend $75 plus for the correct blade. Still-- both brands have double the carbide that any other blade has, which means you will get twice the life of any other blade. The blade will be safer to operate, and your quality of cut will be much better. I have the Diablo and they are better than the Irwin lines. Irwin only sells one decent line and that is their top of the line at much higher price of most other blades. Trust me on this. I do not sell blades any more so nothing to gain. The Popular Tools or Tenryu are worth the price and only get the best. Popular Tools has a Professional line that is really a framing blade -- they use them to compete on price and you will not see anything special with the cut as there is nothing special with the line. IF you are cutting stick and framing a house the Professional line is fine. If you are doing cabinet work or building fine furniture DO NOT compromise with a lower grade of blade. Too often we have seen new EZ owners blame the EZ extrusions or say the track system is too hard to use. The problem is the blade and how the blade is mounted.
High quality lumber or plywood needs a blade that can cut without the tearout. The HATB is the only bevel that will cut Melamine particle board, or phenolic Baltic Birch without chip out. Cut yourself once on Melamine or Phenolic and you will wish you forked over the cash for a high quality HATB blade. I can not remember the name of the university, but it is in Iowa, and the college did a study that recorded the temperature of the blades at the point of the cut. The temp was recorded at 900 deg. and up! The thinner the blade and the thinner the carbide the more distorsion you will have to the blade. Also heat is the enemy of metal. Those thin blades will be degraded and warped after cutting big leaf maple. BLM will have dark brown burn at all the cuts. Just imagine what that is doing to your blade! I think you get my points. Buy your blade from a reputable Wood working tool or wood dealer. Popular Tools brand blades, are only sold through sharpeners, tool repair shops, or quality tool dealers.

Please forgive my disjointed post. It has been a long rough day.
__________________
Phillip
Forum Administrator
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-08-2017, 02:37 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,214
Default

Was curious so I took a look at the Popular tools site. Could not find a 7-1/4" blade in HATB only ATB and TCG. Found a 8" melamine in HATB and no 8-1/4" blades at all. The 7-1/4" 40T ATB is $60.70 at Carbide Processors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by philb View Post
Absinthe: I am a self proclaimed blade expert. My daughter and I had a tool sharpening and tool repair business. I recommend Popular Tools saw blades. We no longer sell blades as I have retired. Be advised, the blades are not cheap, but you are not buying Fort Knox either.
In the 7.25" size blade, I would recommend a 40 tooth, full kerf, HATB, carbide blade. The HATB stands for High Alternating Bevel. The bevel is 30deg (which is an acute angle) and has a full flat face The only other option would be a Triple Chip in the same brand. The triple chip is not as smooth a cut as a HATB blade. Popular Tools or Tenryu are my favorites. You will spend $75 plus for the correct blade. Still-- both brands have double the carbide that any other blade has, which means you will get twice the life of any other blade. The blade will be safer to operate, and your quality of cut will be much better. I have the Diablo and they are better than the Irwin lines. Irwin only sells one decent line and that is their top of the line at much higher price of most other blades. Trust me on this. I do not sell blades any more so nothing to gain. The Popular Tools or Tenryu are worth the price and only get the best. Popular Tools has a Professional line that is really a framing blade -- they use them to compete on price and you will not see anything special with the cut as there is nothing special with the line. IF you are cutting stick and framing a house the Professional line is fine. If you are doing cabinet work or building fine furniture DO NOT compromise with a lower grade of blade. Too often we have seen new EZ owners blame the EZ extrusions or say the track system is too hard to use. The problem is the blade and how the blade is mounted.
High quality lumber or plywood needs a blade that can cut without the tearout. The HATB is the only bevel that will cut Melamine particle board, or phenolic Baltic Birch without chip out. Cut yourself once on Melamine or Phenolic and you will wish you forked over the cash for a high quality HATB blade. I can not remember the name of the university, but it is in Iowa, and the college did a study that recorded the temperature of the blades at the point of the cut. The temp was recorded at 900 deg. and up! The thinner the blade and the thinner the carbide the more distorsion you will have to the blade. Also heat is the enemy of metal. Those thin blades will be degraded and warped after cutting big leaf maple. BLM will have dark brown burn at all the cuts. Just imagine what that is doing to your blade! I think you get my points. Buy your blade from a reputable Wood working tool or wood dealer. Popular Tools brand blades, are only sold through sharpeners, tool repair shops, or quality tool dealers.

Please forgive my disjointed post. It has been a long rough day.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-08-2017, 06:44 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 194
Default

Um, ouch.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-08-2017, 11:06 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,214
Default

In my experience the old adage that you get what you pay for is true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Um, ouch.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-08-2017, 11:49 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 194
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
In my experience the old adage that you get what you pay for is true.
Perhaps, but there has to be a happy medium.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 11:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.