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  #11  
Old 10-04-2011, 10:44 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Last night I got a chance to put up a few more pieces of ply on the walls and also some more outlets. The walls may look a little on the low class side right now but after placing a bead of caulk on the seams and painting it will look good, can't beat free Last night I figured out a use for the drawers. I do not have enough lower cabs to span the right side wall. Four of these drawers stacked sideways make a perfect cab. PL premium will be used to glue them together, then I will knock out the drawer bottoms, and cut a hole in the front. The result is an instant free and sturdy carcase (5/8" ply). I can always make a face frame to dress them up so that no one but me will know that they are ghetto cabinets. One of these cabs will be made to house a mitre saw and I also will put my cross cutting PBB in this row of cabs (removable of course). It will be nice to have a 20' long surface with my cross cutting tools built in.

In the last pic where the stove can be seen. I stopped the ply 5' short of the left side wall. Cement board will be used (3' X 5') so that there will not be any combustible wall near the stove. In addition to this sheet metal will be placed in an ark behind the stove. This serves as a heat barrier to reflect heat out onto the space and keep the wall from getting to hot.

I still have 2 more full sheets of ply left from the beds. Along with the cement board this will get me about 1/2 way finished with the third wall. So the whole garage will be just about done for free! The only cost will be 6 sheets of cement board and 4 sheets of osb (dirt cheap) to finish the walls.

Latter on I will make a suspended ceiling out of 4 X 8 foam sheets and furring strips to keep the heat from escaping in the winter.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2011-10-04_right wall lowres.jpg (41.5 KB, 66 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-10-04_rear wall lowres.jpg (41.7 KB, 59 views)
File Type: jpg 2011-10-04_Stove lowres.jpg (46.0 KB, 59 views)

Last edited by Ken; 10-04-2011 at 10:53 AM.
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  #12  
Old 10-04-2011, 12:24 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burt View Post
For some time, I have been think of opurchasing a portable building and putting it on the lot with my house so I can sell my current shop and pay off some bills - courtesy of the recession and medical problems. I'm retirement age but need to clear some bills to make life more comfortable.

Burt
I think that is a great idea. With this economy who needs the extra bills and headaches of a commercial space, especially for supplementary income? The inside dimensions of my garage are 21' X 21'. It is a nice size space. The thing that really helps is that the table saw is gone. I think you had 3 at one time. They are such a space hog. Just to cut a sheet of ply you need an infeed table, outfeed table, and side tables. Besides the material support 8' on all sides of the saw is required. To rip an 8' board you need 8' plus standing room in front of the saw, almost 3' for the saw, and 8' on the far side of the saw. This means that I would barely be able to rip plywood in my garage and if I heeded to rip a 10' board I would have to open the door or go diagonal! EZ not only lets us work smart but the space savings means a much cheaper operation with less overhead. Just think of the cost to heat alone considering what utilities are now. Still, organisation is key in any workspace. I am still brewing over some ideas on how to set up my shop. It is nice starting with a clean slate.
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  #13  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:18 AM
jswingchun jswingchun is offline
 
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I think it would be a fun project to design and build a workshop from scratch like you are doing. I will be keeping an eye on this thread.
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  #14  
Old 10-05-2011, 10:34 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Originally Posted by jswingchun View Post
I think it would be a fun project to design and build a workshop from scratch like you are doing. I will be keeping an eye on this thread.
One of the things that I am hoping for in this thread is to get some ideas from others as to what works for them in their shops.

Some ideas so far from this thread and others are.

1. Put everything possible on wheels, thanks Burt

2. A 20' long bench (countertop) along a wall. I have always wanted a convenient place for crosscuting long stock but never had the room.

3. Cabinets above and below the 20' bench to provide the bulk of the storage for my woodworking tools. My garage door is 16' wide and there is about 3' of space to either side of the door. This space is perfect for the long bench.

4. Some of my old short and scrap SME's will go on the 20' bench to provide clamping and also to accept the PBB to STK kit for when very long stock needs to be ripped.

5. Mitre saw and my crosscut PBB will be part of the long bench. They will be removable.


6. In the 3' space on the opposite wall I am thinking about putting some shelving (on the walls above head level so as not to kill precious wall space), a rolling plywood rack, mechanics tools, welder..... Eventually I will run a 6g wire out to the shop and put in a sub panel.

7. In the left rear corner will be the wood stove and some firewood storage.

8. Dust collection for all tools. I use a shop vac and a cyclone for dust collection. Pipes and blast gates will be installed along with auto sensing turn on/off to make it convenient to use on all power tools.

9. Overhead outlets and dust ports for 2 PBB's and the smart table.

10. Lots of lights. I like florescent for their even light and almost no shadows. It's funny but the older I get the more light that I seem to need. 20 years ago I practically had night vision.

11. The main floor space needs to be easily cleared for when I need to work on cars. The only tool I have left over form my "large iron" days is a Shopsmith. It is on wheels and will be staying. It is a great machine. Today I mostly use it as a drill press, sanding station, and bandsaw. One of these days I want to play with it ability to be used as a lathe.

12. No traditional woodworking bench. I have a few assembly/general purpose tables made from 3/4" ply (torsion box) and heavy banquet legs that are portable and easily stored out of the way when not needed. When I need to do something such as use a hand plane it will be done on the 20' bench. Most likely I will convert these 2 tables from banquet legs to rolling tables. I want to use the legs to make the prototype EZ-2 that I described in the PBB thread for off site use.

13. I need to come up with an idea for a hardwood storage rack and a place to put it, not to close to the wood stove during the winter

I would appreciate suggestions on things to incorporate into this all purpose shop. The main focus of it is woodworking based around the EZ system.
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  #15  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:24 PM
vincentvega vincentvega is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
As a side note making cut outs for windows and doors is a pleasure to do with a rail. Plunge cuts are simple on the EZ system unlike they were on the Festool saw and tracks that I had 5 years ago. The potential of a kickback was always in my mind and as a result carpentry was not as fun or safe as it is now.
Can you explain how you are plunge cutting with your EZ tools? Thanks
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  #16  
Old 10-06-2011, 12:14 PM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
One of the things that I am hoping for in this thread is to get some ideas from others as to what works for them in their shops.

Some ideas so far from this thread and others are.

1. Put everything possible on wheels, thanks Burt

2. A 20' long bench (countertop) along a wall. I have always wanted a convenient place for crosscuting long stock but never had the room.

3. Cabinets above and below the 20' bench to provide the bulk of the storage for my woodworking tools. My garage door is 16' wide and there is about 3' of space to either side of the door. This space is perfect for the long bench.

4. Some of my old short and scrap SME's will go on the 20' bench to provide clamping and also to accept the PBB to STK kit for when very long stock needs to be ripped.

5. Mitre saw and my crosscut PBB will be part of the long bench. They will be removable.


6. In the 3' space on the opposite wall I am thinking about putting some shelving (on the walls above head level so as not to kill precious wall space), a rolling plywood rack, mechanics tools, welder..... Eventually I will run a 6g wire out to the shop and put in a sub panel.

7. In the left rear corner will be the wood stove and some firewood storage.

8. Dust collection for all tools. I use a shop vac and a cyclone for dust collection. Pipes and blast gates will be installed along with auto sensing turn on/off to make it convenient to use on all power tools.

9. Overhead outlets and dust ports for 2 PBB's and the smart table.

10. Lots of lights. I like florescent for their even light and almost no shadows. It's funny but the older I get the more light that I seem to need. 20 years ago I practically had night vision.

11. The main floor space needs to be easily cleared for when I need to work on cars. The only tool I have left over form my "large iron" days is a Shopsmith. It is on wheels and will be staying. It is a great machine. Today I mostly use it as a drill press, sanding station, and bandsaw. One of these days I want to play with it ability to be used as a lathe.

12. No traditional woodworking bench. I have a few assembly/general purpose tables made from 3/4" ply (torsion box) and heavy banquet legs that are portable and easily stored out of the way when not needed. When I need to do something such as use a hand plane it will be done on the 20' bench. Most likely I will convert these 2 tables from banquet legs to rolling tables. I want to use the legs to make the prototype EZ-2 that I described in the PBB thread for off site use.
I would look to Dik's blog, at an EZ cut off saw idea he did. (track comes down on hinge if I remember correctly)
With some basic way of mounting a track (SME, T track, etc) on the back wall, you could slide it anywhere on the back bench, and cut off 2" of a 20' long board, or cut the board in half.
I also am against wall cabinets across an entire wall personally. I like the idea of dust free storage, but most cabinets don't have great adjust-ability, nor are they easily removable, if you need to work on a large project on a bench. (remember benches also gather clutter)
I would consider a section of removable shelves as well as making one of your torsion boxes a section of your bench that you could remove. I would prefer stronger legs (with wheels), over the folding legs, as I would probably drill holes in it, and make my own version of a Blum Bench, where you use pipe clamps for vises. (for hand planing or hold downs when working with other power tools) EZ clamps are great, but I choose not to have that as an only option.
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  #17  
Old 10-06-2011, 03:28 PM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
I would look to Dik's blog, at an EZ cut off saw idea he did. (track comes down on hinge if I remember correctly)
With some basic way of mounting a track (SME, T track, etc) on the back wall, you could slide it anywhere on the back bench, and cut off 2" of a 20' long board, or cut the board in half.

I have looked at Dik's hinged crosscutter and have been thinking about it. Your idea about having a sliding mount on the wall is great. I just happen to have a lot of T track that I got dirt cheap on a close out that would be perfect for this. The only thing that would be even better is to also figure out a way to make it swivel for cutting angles. This would allow me to put the mitre saw away and keep it as a portable trim tool only (crown).

I also am against wall cabinets across an entire wall personally. I like the idea of dust free storage, but most cabinets don't have great adjust-ability, nor are they easily removable, if you need to work on a large project on a bench. (remember benches also gather clutter)

Dust free storage is the idea. I will use up the old kitchen cabs that I have to accomplish this and then take your advice and use the 2 torsion box tables in locking wheels to complete the long bench.

I would consider a section of removable shelves as well as making one of your torsion boxes a section of your bench that you could remove.

I also have about 300 adjustable shelves (3/4" ply) and all the mounting hardware/brackets to go with it. These came from the college that I work for. They were going to be thrown away. They were taken out as the dorms were updated with all new furniture. So I will be using a ton of adjustable/removable shelving around the garage.

I would prefer stronger legs (with wheels), over the folding legs, as I would probably drill holes in it, and make my own version of a Blum Bench, where you use pipe clamps for vises. (for hand planing or hold downs when working with other power tools) EZ clamps are great, but I choose not to have that as an only option.

The folding legs will come off of the torsion box tables and be replaced by a 2 X 4 frame with a shelf. Locking castors will be used. These tables were my old style PBB's from a few years ago. They still have SME on them and a top kit so they will be very flexible multi purpose tables. The folding legs are very strong and will be repurposed in to two identical easily portable benches. One gets a bridge and the other is for extra support or expansion. They both will work together for a larger smart table. These are for off site work and to provide additional work surfaces when needed.
Thanks, you gave me some great ideas!
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  #18  
Old 10-06-2011, 04:05 PM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Doing angles could be possible. In 2012 when Dino releases whatever he has come up with for setting angles with the miter square, with short pieces (square slides under the rail). I would think you could play with mounting the rail via a miter gauge, however, personally I would want the cut off device to be fixed at 90 degrees, and just use the rail and square separately.
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  #19  
Old 10-06-2011, 04:14 PM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson: I would look to Dik's blog, at an EZ cut off saw idea he did. (track comes down on hinge if I remember correctly)
With some basic way of mounting a track (SME, T track, etc) on the back wall, you could slide it anywhere on the back bench, and cut off 2" of a 20' long board, or cut the board in half.

Response by Ken: I have looked at Dik's hinged crosscutter and have been thinking about it. Your idea about having a sliding mount on the wall is great. I just happen to have a lot of T track that I got dirt cheap on a close out that would be perfect for this. The only thing that would be even better is to also figure out a way to make it swivel for cutting angles. This would allow me to put the mitre saw away and keep it as a portable trim tool only (crown).



Interesting how several of us are having the same ideas. I have recently worked on a few ideas along these lines. Sent some along to Dino in response to his EZ Design Challenge.

Joe
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  #20  
Old 10-06-2011, 07:39 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Default swiveling cutting table

Ken, I'm loving reading the chronology and thoughts behind your workshop. I only wish I was located nearby so I could come get in your way- I enjoy projects like yours.

I've had some thoughts about how to make a swiveling crosscutting table like you mentioned. I've worked out the thoughts, but haven't had the time to pursue them yet.
What I've come up with looks something like this: design the bench with a rotating section where the crosscut section of track would be. I'd do the rotating with a large lazy susan rotating assembly. (Slewing rings are way too expensive.) Would be easy to build the rotating part to always be in the correct plane as the rest of the workbench. Also, I'd index the table to always be able to quickly set angles like 90, 45, and other angles I might use often, and, design in a quick clamp to keep it locked in.
The track would rotate with the rotating part, fastened to the rotating part using pneumatic cylinders (http://www.automationdirect.com/adc/Home/Home). They are inexpensive, can be easily hooked up to a foot actuated switch, and can be purchased in different length 'throws' so you could get the height under the track that you'd want. Single action cylinders should work ok.
I'd mount the pneumatic cylinders to the rotating part of the workbench so that the rotating part, the cylinders, and the track were all one unit.
Clear so far?
The only downsides that I've thought of go like this:
-say you wanted to crosscut a 2" board that is 3/4" thick. Hit the foot feed, the track goes instantly up; slide the board to the cut line; release the foot feed; the track instantly drops; BUT, in the back of the track, where there is no wood, the cylinder wants to pull the track down to the table, while the front side, where the wood is, is up on top of the 3/4" board. The solution would be to slide a scrap piece of wood under the track at the back, equal to the thickness of the wood you are cutting.
-Plus, with the manual bridge, one can raise the bridge manually, to relieve pressure on the material being cut in order to reposition it ever so slightly if needed. With the pneumatic cylinders, that would be tough.

Anyway, it's the beginning of an idea. Maybe it'll jog your mind into another path that works.

Thanks,
Rick
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