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Old 12-10-2016, 03:08 PM
WatchurFingers WatchurFingers is offline
 
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Posts: 27
Default Not EZ ready, EZ-saw

In this post: http://tracksawforum.com/showthread.php?t=2578
There is a picture of what is now called the EZ smart circular saw. Is this the same thing?
The picture appears to be, but I don't see anything in the description about the base working on others tracks, that the thread states? Found a piece of a Grizzly track for their tracksaw, cheap, and I thought this could work for a skylight project that is coming up (screw it to the ceiling, and only have to worry about holding the saw). I am not fond of ladders and working overhead.
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  #2  
Old 12-10-2016, 05:10 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Austin, Tx.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WatchurFingers View Post
a skylight project that is coming up (screw it to the ceiling, and only have to worry about holding the saw). I am not fond of ladders and working overhead.
Thru the years, I've put in tons of skylights for folks. Easiest/fastest/cleanest way I've found to cut in skylight openings in existing sheetrock ceilings is to use a rough-cut blade on an oscillating tool in one hand, vac hose in the other, at the cutting blade, and cut along a marked line on the desired sheetrock opening. (Using high speed on the oscillating saw works better than low speed when cutting.)

Goes plenty quick w/great accuracy and minimal dust from sawing. Using a circular saw blade makes the max. dust possible. To maintain 'control', I'd cut out the opening and leave ~1" uncut at each corner (assuming a small-ish opening); ditch the oscillating saw and vac; support the S/R w/one hand; finish the corner cuts w/keyhole saw; lower S/R; done.

If you're cutting out a large section of ceiling, do it in sections.

HTH,
Rick
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  #3  
Old 12-10-2016, 06:49 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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That EZ Saw hasn't been on their website for a long time. I doubt if it is available. I'm not sure it was ever available, I don't remember anyone on this forum buying one and reviewing it and you'd think someone here would be an early adopter. As I remember, it was intended to mount on the EZ Base anyway, it didn't have a track groove in its base and couldn't take anti-chip inserts.
As Rick mentioned, a CS is about the dustiest way to cut drywall.
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  #4  
Old 12-10-2016, 06:59 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Hey, I was wrong. The EZ Saw is back on their website. Still looks like it requires an EZ Base
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  #5  
Old 12-13-2016, 01:48 AM
WatchurFingers WatchurFingers is offline
 
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I didn't even consider an oscillating tool. Although this isn't through sheetrock, but an older home, with plaster ceilings that have had a metal ceiling paneling over them. (my fear is that was put over cracking plaster)
So my thought was score the metal, peel back, score the plaster and chip that out then cut the lathe underneath. Any other thoughts or experience is appreciated.
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  #6  
Old 12-13-2016, 10:31 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WatchurFingers View Post
I didn't even consider an oscillating tool. Although this isn't through sheetrock, but an older home, with plaster ceilings that have had a metal ceiling paneling over them. (my fear is that was put over cracking plaster)
So my thought was score the metal, peel back, score the plaster and chip that out then cut the lathe underneath. Any other thoughts or experience is appreciated.
Fun.

The way I approached plaster ceilings usually went like this:

First, put up some of these, or similar: http://www.zipwall.com/xcart/ As well as cover the floor with cheap plywood, just in case the plaster gives way and crashes to the floor.

Then, I would access the attic thru the roof hole where the skylight will be, to be able to frame in, from the attic side, w/out messing with the plaster yet, the ceiling cut-out for the skylight. Due to plaster having so much weight, I made a point to screw everything together, not nail gun, lest I shake the plaster loose. Also, I would run a few stiff-backs on the backside of the ceiling joists- eliminating bouncing and shaking is good in this case.

Now for the plaster removal. Good wisdom found here: http://forums.finehomebuilding.com/b...-blade-plaster
I think Lenox might still make the plaster blades.

I would start, from the attic side, drilling a series of small-ish holes thru the plaster, at each corner, say, about 1 1/2"-2" long, along the opening framing. The point here is to mark the corners of the ceiling skylight opening to be seen from below and to allow metal strapping to be fed thru them.
Then, cut a piece of ply ~2" smaller than the ceiling opening. Screw that ply to the middle of the ceiling opening, to hold it in place while you get some metal strapping up thru the drilled holes. (This will work: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Perforate...-4HS/100396917 Double it up if you are concerned about the strength required to hold the plaster piece that will be cut out.) Get in the attic and pull the strapping tight- fasten to the skylight opening framing. (Be sure to allow a bit of extra strapping- we'll be needing to lower the plaster/plywood affair a few inches once the plaster has been cut.)

OK, so now we should be looking at a piece of ply on the ceiling, roughly centered inside of the ceiling cut-out; at each end of the ply, we'll see metal strapping crossing those ends and going up into the attic thru the small line of holes we drilled earlier; in the attic, the metal strapping is fastened tightly to the attic opening framing.

Time to cut the plaster.

Cut from the attic side, due to the recip. saw blade cutting on the pull stroke. Theoretically, since the plaster is being held by the ply/strapping, you can cut the plaster free and it will sit comfortably on top of the ply. When it is free, working from the attic, lower each corner of the strapping a couple of inches; run down below, and, with a helper, pull the plaster out one end of the ply support; remove the ply and the strapping; finish skylight framing/installation.

One advantage of doing it this way is that, if the plaster that is being removed breaks up while being cut, the ply is holding it and keeping it from making a mess.

Re. the metal over the ceiling: if it is not easily removable around the skylight opening, I would cut it in place using my oscillating saw w/a metal blade. Takes a while, but offers control and quality. I'd have to see it, tho, to know what other options there might be.

This procedure has worked for me in the past, your mileage may vary.
hth,
Rick
ps I've included a few pics of the skylight and opening I ended up putting in my house. Usually I use Velux, but used a Fakro instead; both are excellent skylights. Apologies for the poor pics.
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Last edited by bumpnstump; 12-13-2016 at 10:34 AM.
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  #7  
Old 12-13-2016, 09:14 PM
philb philb is offline
 
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Default Removing plaster

Fingers: Rick has a good process. The only thing I can add is what NOT to do. I know the don't do sequence pretty well. I Probably resembled an episode of the Three Stooges all in one, clown of a carpenter . I had presumed that -- since the home was pre WW2 housing, the plaster & lath was wood lath nailed in strips. WRONG! It was expanded metal and vibrated on the Richter scale! The cinching down plywood on the plaster side, will help stop the vibrations for sure. My point is that you need to check the lath type, the wood is much less vibration.
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