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  #11  
Old 01-03-2017, 12:39 AM
michaelJ michaelJ is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
I got the saw cutting somewhat 90 but there seems to be a bit of a wiggle somewhere along the line. Definitely not like cutting on a TS with a fence. I am not sure the saw itself is wiggling relative to its base or the EZ base or the ez-base is wiggling on the track. That will take more work and exploration and experimentation.

I was able to get the strips taped down and cut. They didn't explode this time and so I guess that is a better thing. I am not confident they align to the cut line 100% but I am willing to give them a pass for the time being.

Yeah, I am not doing this for a living, and it is a good thing because if I were depending on it I would be in trouble.
Definitely experiment and make many test cuts. Your body position needs to stay rather consistent through the cut from beginning to end. If you think the saw base is a bit loose on the rail, perhaps giving it a slight bit of twist will keep you on the straight path.

Good to hear you got the strips cut without incident.

I cut up a fair bit of plywood recently, and all of the cuts are straight, like lights out on a 5 foot level.

As far as the recommendation on the Dewalt DWE575, that I would relegate to the UEG if you are considering a second saw. Nice and lightweight.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2017, 07:15 AM
philb philb is offline
 
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Posts: 164
Default Bosch CS 20

I have a Bosch CS20. I have used it since 2006 when I started using EZ tools. I have never been let down by the tool, and I have no regrets, or wish I woulda! I was told the direct plug in was a trinket gimmick idea. I disagree! My daughter has a sharpening and tool repair business and the number one foul up with a circular saw, is damage to a cord. Carpenters lift the saw from floor to floor with the cord. The CS20 has a tie off for the cord so no damage will be expected. Cutting the cord with your own saw is another issue. Still you can put another female end on the cord and you are up and running. Can't do that with one of the other brands. Home Depot has a section for Skil 77 replacement cords. It is so common that our HD has 3 or 4 replacement cords on hand at all times. My point is that you do not need a "better" or "different" saw for your EZ tools. Some guys want to wring out every last millimeter for their depth of cut. I have not had occasion to make a cut that I could not make. Not saying they do not exist, just saying that I have never had a task that I could not cut with the CS20.
Check the statistics and compare your CS10 to the CS20. I see no reason to buy another saw unless you really want a new saw. Then of course we will understand THAT problem.
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2017, 08:46 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelJ View Post
Definitely experiment and make many test cuts. Your body position needs to stay rather consistent through the cut from beginning to end. If you think the saw base is a bit loose on the rail, perhaps giving it a slight bit of twist will keep you on the straight path.

Good to hear you got the strips cut without incident.

I cut up a fair bit of plywood recently, and all of the cuts are straight, like lights out on a 5 foot level.

As far as the recommendation on the Dewalt DWE575, that I would relegate to the UEG if you are considering a second saw. Nice and lightweight.
All this talk about body English and twisting the saw and such feels wrong. I was pretty sure the idea was that the track should guide the saw and I should be using as little pressure as possible as opposed to clamped straight edge style saw guides. I am doing my best, though my arms aren't long enough to cut a long run, and I seem to have to cut with my left hand on the saw instead of my right unless I want to be reaching over the wider part of the work piece.

I don't think I would be wanting a saw to relegate to the UEG, but rather something better for on track use. That again, is if the faults lie in the Bosch. The squaring and depth setting are kind of frustrating on this thing. I am not sure why specifically, but once squared for the cut the indicator is hardly on '0'. I will have to dig deeper to see if that is adjustable, but I fear that over time it will slip or otherwise come out of adjustment. The detentes on the depths are probably a great thing without the added base, but as it is it seems like I will have to always use it at full depth, since most of the detentes positions are not effective depths anymore on the base+track. I guess the best thing would be if there were a saw that instead of their own base plate had a plate that matched the EZ so that one doesn't have that one more thing attached to add error to the mix. But then I would be dealing with an actual "tracksaw" rather than an adapted saw.
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  #14  
Old 01-03-2017, 09:09 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philb View Post
I have a Bosch CS20. I have used it since 2006 when I started using EZ tools. I have never been let down by the tool, and I have no regrets, or wish I woulda! I was told the direct plug in was a trinket gimmick idea. I disagree! My daughter has a sharpening and tool repair business and the number one foul up with a circular saw, is damage to a cord. Carpenters lift the saw from floor to floor with the cord. The CS20 has a tie off for the cord so no damage will be expected. Cutting the cord with your own saw is another issue. Still you can put another female end on the cord and you are up and running. Can't do that with one of the other brands. Home Depot has a section for Skil 77 replacement cords. It is so common that our HD has 3 or 4 replacement cords on hand at all times. My point is that you do not need a "better" or "different" saw for your EZ tools. Some guys want to wring out every last millimeter for their depth of cut. I have not had occasion to make a cut that I could not make. Not saying they do not exist, just saying that I have never had a task that I could not cut with the CS20.
Check the statistics and compare your CS10 to the CS20. I see no reason to buy another saw unless you really want a new saw. Then of course we will understand THAT problem.
Phil,

I don't want another saw. Well, other than a table saw with a wider fence capability. I really would prefer to get my money out of this saw. I can see how the detentes features are really great if you are using the saw as it was intended. But they are less than useless with the added base, just because you can't tighten it down if it is "close" to one of the detentes without it pulling into that detentes. This was mostly a problem for trying to make the ACE strip cuts. Hopefully I will not have to make a cut to that depth precision ever again with this saw, so set it all the way deep and get on with life.

Getting the saw to cut square has been somewhat of a challenge however. Laying a square on the base and looking at the blade against the leg and trying to adjust was less than ideal, what with me lacking 3 or 4 hands that would seem necessary for such feats. I was however able to make a cut, measure it, then adjust the angle somewhat, make another cut and so forth until the try-square sat nicely on it. Again, less than an optimal method for setting a blade angle, but I guess this saw was made to cut dimensional lumber at job sites, to precisions you could mark with a carpenter's pencil. I can't fault a tool that works as designed. On the other hand, once I have the saw seemingly to cut square, it doesn't seem to do so over the length of a long cut. So either I am wobbling the saw on the track (quite possible) or the base and the track are not moving in a precision manner, or the saw and its connection to either its own base or the EZ sub base is having some play. If I can eliminate these possibilities one at a time, perhaps I can determine if it is technique or equipment.

I need to get some more plywood to cut up now so that I can do some more testing. I am open to suggestions and ideas for how to dial things in accurately or set things up for more than just a rudimentary rough cut.
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  #15  
Old 01-03-2017, 01:51 PM
sean9c sean9c is online now
 
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Did you check and see that the Anti Chip Insert in your Base is not too thick? Most, some, all seem to be. Put your saw on the track behind your piece of wood, gently push the saw onto the wood, if you feel it bump up slightly that is the AC Insert bumping into your wood. It'll lift the saw slightly which might make it cut out of square. To fix it put a piece of sandpaper on your table under your track and run the saw over it a few times to sand the Insert.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:22 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Did you check and see that the Anti Chip Insert in your Base is not too thick? Most, some, all seem to be. Put your saw on the track behind your piece of wood, gently push the saw onto the wood, if you feel it bump up slightly that is the AC Insert bumping into your wood. It'll lift the saw slightly which might make it cut out of square. To fix it put a piece of sandpaper on your table under your track and run the saw over it a few times to sand the Insert.
I will try to look at that tonight. Although, I was testing pretty close to the edge, just slicing off 3 mm or so, but that could certainly have an effect.

I'd consider a successful final test to be able to make a 4 sided square box using "running" butt joints. (Not sure that is the technical term, but it makes a square when all the sides are the same length, like a miter, but no miter cuts. Each board has one inside and one outside and it runs around the square.) For extra points make it a cube with sides 5 and 6 smaller in both dimensions by the thickness of the panel. I am nowhere near confident that I can accomplish this at this point. But one has to have goals
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:26 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Lexington, Ky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
"detentes positions "
While at Lowe's today (Bosch dealer), I had a peek at your saw. The 'detent-ing' is caused by a spring pushing a special washer into the detent areas of the saw depth guide when said washer passes over said detent areas. Couldn't tell for sure, but it appears the washer has a 'shoulder' milled into it that drops into the detent area.

The easy fix is to remove that special washer and install a non-shouldered washer in it's place; ~$.03 at any store.

To remove: first, remove the saw blade; then remove the rubber bumper that keeps the saw guard from retracting past a certain point. Next, remove the cap at the saw-depth lock-down lever. Under that cap is either another screw, or, a nut- remove it. Now, the lever should lift off, and, the shaft that goes to the saw-depth guide should pull out from the cavity where the saw blade goes. Because the saw blade guard can now rotate out of the way (due to guard bumper removal earlier), you will have easy access to the shaft. Remove Bosch washer; insert your washer; reassemble in reverse order; done. Detent problem should be solved.

Some might view this as a "hack"; I see it as a "fix": doing whatever it takes to make it do what I want it to.
HTH,
Rick
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:33 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 225
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Seems like we're moving from performance into preference. Regardless of the tool...

We know that you get the best results when you don't have to use much force to make the cut. Keeping the material or tool straight, having a sharp bit or blade, and proper rpm is essential for that.

Quality control varies even with high end products. Sometimes you get a dud or lemon. I once had an inexpensive CS that wouldn't adjust all the way square untill I filed the bevel adjustment.

All adjustable tools will need to be adjusted eventually. I've never bought a saw that did not need to be dialed in and more expensive tools require more time to do that.

That said, a poorly designed or assembled tool may require endless adjustments and still give poor results.

Usually, you get what you pay for. When I switched to a CS with a magnesium foot plate my accuracy improved noticeably because the mag plate and how it attached to the rest of the saw was stronger and stiffer than the old saw with a stamped steel plate.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2017, 03:14 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Posts: 268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
While at Lowe's today (Bosch dealer), I had a peek at your saw. The 'detent-ing' is caused by a spring pushing a special washer into the detent areas of the saw depth guide when said washer passes over said detent areas. Couldn't tell for sure, but it appears the washer has a 'shoulder' milled into it that drops into the detent area.

The easy fix is to remove that special washer and install a non-shouldered washer in it's place; ~$.03 at any store.

To remove: first, remove the saw blade; then remove the rubber bumper that keeps the saw guard from retracting past a certain point. Next, remove the cap at the saw-depth lock-down lever. Under that cap is either another screw, or, a nut- remove it. Now, the lever should lift off, and, the shaft that goes to the saw-depth guide should pull out from the cavity where the saw blade goes. Because the saw blade guard can now rotate out of the way (due to guard bumper removal earlier), you will have easy access to the shaft. Remove Bosch washer; insert your washer; reassemble in reverse order; done. Detent problem should be solved.

Some might view this as a "hack"; I see it as a "fix": doing whatever it takes to make it do what I want it to.
HTH,
Rick
Thanks Rick! I will look into giving this a try. Apparently sometimes one needs a hack to get things working right. I always feel odd taking power tools apart, but since I already drilled holes into this one the first night I had it, you'd think I might not feel so bad about it. When I get back to the saw I will look at what it will take to do what you are saying and see if it is currently worth it since I don't have to cut any more strips and can't imagine another scenario where I will need to adjust the depth to something so slight.

Although, you are giving me thoughts of tearing down the Skill to see if there is a bushing or bearing that I can replace to fix the slop in that one.
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2017, 03:20 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Posts: 268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
All adjustable tools will need to be adjusted eventually. I've never bought a saw that did not need to be dialed in and more expensive tools require more time to do that.

Usually, you get what you pay for. When I switched to a CS with a magnesium foot plate my accuracy improved noticeably because the mag plate and how it attached to the rest of the saw was stronger and stiffer than the old saw with a stamped steel plate.
This particular saw has a cast metal baseplate. I am assuming it is aluminum, but it is definitely the stamped steel I have seen on many others. That was what attracted my eye to it when I bought it. Seemed like it might attach to the ez base plate better than my previous one.

I get that adjustments need to be made. My concern is when you have a 0 scale on something there is normally an adjustable stop to actually set to keep the 0 location. Like on the miter gauge for the table saw, or the tilt adjustments on my bandsaw table.
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