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  #21  
Old 01-03-2017, 03:54 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Austin, Tx.
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Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
thoughts of tearing down the Skill to see if there is a bushing or bearing that I can replace to fix the slop in that one.
Here is a nice tutorial on the procedure, should you need one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NIXbeNFH5k

Tho it's a mitre saw in the video, the concepts/most of the procedure are the same for the circular saw.

When it's time for bearings, google 'bearings and seals online'- should be tons of options; or, if you have a bearing dealer nearby, that's even better. To know what to order, you'll need to have the old bearings out so you can locate the # on them.

Whenever it's new bearing time for my tools, I make a point to call a dealer and discuss options with them, mainly with the goal of getting better than what the tool started out with. Bearings are inexpensive- it doesn't cost much to upgrade. I've saved tons of $ thru the years by replacing shot bearings; often, the new/better bearings make the tool sound/work smoother than when new!
Rick
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  #22  
Old 01-03-2017, 06:53 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Here is a nice tutorial on the procedure, should you need one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NIXbeNFH5k

Tho it's a mitre saw in the video, the concepts/most of the procedure are the same for the circular saw.

When it's time for bearings, google 'bearings and seals online'- should be tons of options; or, if you have a bearing dealer nearby, that's even better. To know what to order, you'll need to have the old bearings out so you can locate the # on them.

Whenever it's new bearing time for my tools, I make a point to call a dealer and discuss options with them, mainly with the goal of getting better than what the tool started out with. Bearings are inexpensive- it doesn't cost much to upgrade. I've saved tons of $ thru the years by replacing shot bearings; often, the new/better bearings make the tool sound/work smoother than when new!
Rick
Thanks I am watching it now.

I said bearing, but I am not 100% that is the problem yet. The behavior that one has is that if I sit it on end I can lift the blade maybe 3 or 4 mm. I am sure I will know more when I open it up. I am not sure what else it could be so I say bearings.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2017, 01:09 AM
michaelJ michaelJ is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
This particular saw has a cast metal baseplate. I am assuming it is aluminum, but it is definitely the stamped steel I have seen on many others. That was what attracted my eye to it when I bought it. Seemed like it might attach to the ez base plate better than my previous one.

I get that adjustments need to be made. My concern is when you have a 0 scale on something there is normally an adjustable stop to actually set to keep the 0 location. Like on the miter gauge for the table saw, or the tilt adjustments on my bandsaw table.
I understand your frustration, however 0 is not always 0, regardless of the tool. If you plan to make all kinds of mitered cuts and then go back to 0, you should be really setting and checking the angle with a square to make sure you are really and truly square.

On my Makita, there is a small set screw in the base that lets you change the position of the stop for 0 degrees. Not sure if your CS10 has a similar one. Sometimes with vibration, the set screw can move, so it's not always an absolute 100 percent foolproof system.

It's hard to do precision work with tools that are fighting you.

When using the UEG, I squeeze the trigger on my makita with the left hand, and push the UEG against the side of the wood and forward with my right.

Same goes for the saw on the track, I use my left hand to push the saw.

Hope that helps.
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2017, 02:26 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Rick, I just got off the phone with Skil. When I explained the issue, the tech said, I probably need "fiber washers for your sleeve bearings" and continued on to suggest that otherwise my bearings sounded to be in working order.

Funny thing, when I told him I had around 3mm movement he said that should be ok. I was incredulous and rephrased it to 1/8" and he said oh that's bad. Bless his heart.
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2017, 04:49 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Rick, I just got off the phone with Skil. When I explained the issue, the tech said, I probably need "fiber washers for your sleeve bearings" and continued on to suggest that otherwise my bearings sounded to be in working order.

Funny thing, when I told him I had around 3mm movement he said that should be ok. I was incredulous and rephrased it to 1/8" and he said oh that's bad. Bless his heart.
In the schematic for your Skil, I couldn't find any "fiber washers", tho I think I understand where he was going with that statement.

In this schematic http://www.ereplacementparts.com/ski...0_160_838.html there are a couple of options.
-could be bearings (#13 & 14) wearing out- I doubt it, since you'd hear the motor 'grinding' when you turn it on.
-my guess would be that it's something related to #21, the pinion shaft. In the pic, just to the right of #21 is a seemingly un-numbered part; looks like a sleeve/bushing- the part# (#80) is located directly above #18, front housing. W/out actually having the assembly in front of me, my guess is that the bushing is also a spacer of sorts to keep the pinion gear pushed out where it should be. Could be that the bushing is worn, allowing the slop in that pinion gear (which is what the saw blade attaches to).

By removing the saw blade, screwing the blade-retaining screw back in loosely, and push/pull on the screw, you'll probably feel the 3mm movement. To repair, just follow the schematic re. disassembly till you can pull the pinion gear and it's bushing free of the machine. Even tho the replacement parts site lists it as unobtainable, one of the online bearing places will probably have one to fit. Worst case scenario: run the disassembled saw to someone who does machine work, and they can fabricate one for you.
Rick
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  #26  
Old 01-04-2017, 10:51 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Rick, this is sounding like a bigger project than I am ready to take on. This saw has done its time and served well enough for probably near 20 years. From what I was understanding I needed to contact a generic motor repair place to get such parts. And I should tell them I had sleeve bearings. It sounds to me like a shim of a sort. He said start with smaller ones and put one at each end so it kind of centers things. But there should still me some play so that it does not heat up the bearings. At this point, I can either put it away and try to fix it when I have free time that I don't know what to do with. Or put it up on Craigslist for a low price and let it become someone else's problem, unless they simply want to use it the way I had been using it, which didn't seem to matter for cutting up things that weren't critical.

But I saw an interesting 7-1/4 Makita (not sure the model couldn't find any numbers or anything on it just the sticker that pointed at the shaft lock) at the local pawn shop for like $55. Everything seemed tight, but I didn't run it or anything. It has a nice flat base plate which would seem to connect to the EZ base well. So possibly for a second saw, that could be a doer. Just don't know if I need one right now.

Anyway, thanks for the help on the Skil, I will see how industrious I feel after the weekend. For now, I need to clear the table I was doing all the EZ testing, and finish up the cabinet I started before the EZ stuff got here. It is amazing how just a few projects going at one time takes up all the actual space in the shop. Well at least every flat surface
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