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  #11  
Old 06-04-2017, 11:12 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burt View Post
The best solution I have found for miter cuts with EZ is to replace the miter bar on a miter gauge with a piece of EZ connector and attach a longer guide to the miter gauge.
Burt,

Might you by any chance have a few pictures of this setup that can be shared? I usually struggle a bit to understand many of the nice modifications folks here make. Unfortunately, even when pictures are posted I often just don't get it. Sigh
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2017, 03:23 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
There are a few things that are coming to mind. I do want to pick up the track to place the next piece to cut. Maybe I don't need the bridge per-se but a way to lift the track high enough to manipulate the wood underneath. I also like the concept that FT uses cutting towards the squaring stop and just hinges up. So maybe I can come up with something that does something along those lines.
Don't know if this will help, but here is a super-simple cutting table that can give fast, repeatable results and addresses the absence of a bridge.

pic one shows the components: random piece of board (the squarish, dark, sheet siding); 5' piece of 1x stick (3" wide baltic birch works great); piece of track (54", in this example); couple of knobs w/thru bolts (you can use nuts/washers if you don't have knobs); couple of bolts (the two silver items); two 'push-sticks'; in this case, I am using slotted sticks- you could substitute non-slotted sticks and clamps for the slotted sticks and knobs I am using. I'm just trying to show the basic concept- one can take these principles and morph them into something fancy, if that is best for them.

pic two shows the components assembled: white 1x stick attached to the bottom of the dark sheet siding; we don't want this stick to be moving. The silver bolts are screwed into this board, approx. 51" apart- we want a 48" piece of ply to fit between them; and, we want a 54" track to abut them. In my example, I located the 1x so the cut line of the track saw would be slightly past the edge of the sheet siding- that's just my preference, as well as allowing this contraption to cut max width; the white stick can be put wherever is convenient for the user. Also note the black knobs holding the two adjustable sticks- insert the bolts thru the bottom of the sheet siding; clamp the sticks where needed.

pic three shows a piece of ply ready to be cut. In this pic, it is ~17.5" cut.

To use this contraption, elevate the cut edge on a 2x: i. e. to allow gravity to pull the material down towards the stop-sticks. Set the track against the silver bolts. Adjust the stop-sticks to the desired cut distance from the tracksaw cut-line. Remove the track; plop the material against the stop-sticks; re-set the track against the silver bolts; make the cut; repeat as necessary.

Hope this helps,
Rick
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Last edited by bumpnstump; 06-04-2017 at 07:09 PM.
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2017, 09:45 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Rick, that's great. I guess it eliminates the square as well, but doesn't really address "raising the rail" between cuts. Nor does it address cross cutting, such as for rails and stiles and door frame components. I assume if a very low fence was added at one or both ends of this specifically square to the knock bolts...

This is great, though, where do I see more of these kinds of user "hacks" to the system?
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2017, 10:58 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Rick, that's great. I guess it eliminates the square as well, but doesn't really address "raising the rail" between cuts. Nor does it address cross cutting, such as for rails and stiles and door frame components. I assume if a very low fence was added at one or both ends of this specifically square to the knock bolts...

This is great, though, where do I see more of these kinds of user "hacks" to the system?
The 'raising the rail' happens when you remove the track from off of the two indexing bolts and set it aside in order to access the cut material and install new material; then, set the rail back against the bolts and you're ready for the next cut- as long as the track is against those two bolts, the cut line will always be in the same place; only by moving the 'stop-sticks' can you change the size of the cut piece. Once set up, there is no need for the 'repeater' or 'cabinet maker set' or clamps. Using this jig is actually quicker than using my EZ-1, w/the bridge.... and just as accurate.

The square could still be handy for doing crosscutting after panel widths have been cut. Better yet, if the concept appeals to how you approach your work, simple modifications can allow this contraption to also allow crosscutting.

re "hacks": there is no single place on this forum where 'hacks' are posted- there are just too many, and they are scattered thru the forum's history. What seems to work best is to post a 'problem' and ask for viewer's input- often someone will give a link to a post where that 'problem' is addressed; others might show how they've approached a solution; etc. There are some major-league problem solvers that visit here, and I've learned tons reading their posts. But..... they usually won't post if there is no one asking. I posted this because of issues you brought up in some of your postings- I thought this might offer a part-solution, or, at least, present a different approach to solving those issues.

Rick

Last edited by bumpnstump; 06-04-2017 at 11:01 PM.
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  #15  
Old 06-05-2017, 10:53 AM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
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Rick,

thank you again for sharing your ideas.

I have a few questions:
1. Am I correct in thinking that there is no need to clamp the guiderail to anything since it is resting against the two bolts and is tilted towards the work piece due to the 2x it is resting on? If you dont clamp it do you take an extra effort to keep it from moving? such as a little extra downward pressure on saw etc. Is it even a concern?

2. Obviously the keeper is always under the track? (this question is most likely a public display of ignorance) 8-)

3. Is the white board attached permanently to the brown panel? What is your method of attaching it?

4. What method do you use to quickly ensure that the "stops" are adjusted to exactly the same length to ensure an accurately square cut? I would probably use a tape measure on both but I know you probably have a faster and more accurately way of doing it.

thanks!
Jim
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  #16  
Old 06-05-2017, 11:00 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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It does seem like a good starting point. I do like the parallel edge guides, which I think you are calling "push sticks" in this example. I assume you set them individually or do you use a story stick of sorts to set them from the front? Does the work sit against the knock bolts as well? This also brings to mind the thought of a row of knock bolts along the bottom running on a line perpendicular to the two you have on the front. I also like the idea of having a definite cut-line as the edge of the board.
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  #17  
Old 06-05-2017, 11:42 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
Rick,

thank you again for sharing your ideas.

I have a few questions:
1. Am I correct in thinking that there is no need to clamp the guiderail to anything since it is resting against the two bolts and is tilted towards the work piece due to the 2x it is resting on? If you dont clamp it do you take an extra effort to keep it from moving? such as a little extra downward pressure on saw etc. Is it even a concern?

Yes to all the above..... In reality, using something like what is shown in pic one of the side-track-handles makes the clamps totally unnecessary. Just the slightest holding pressure using one of the handles makes for a non-moving track; and.... if placed midway on the track, makes for a great handle to pick-up and lay-down the track. For such a simple/cheap mod, it surprised me just how much it enriched using loose track- I've put 'em on all of my tracks.

2. Obviously the keeper is always under the track? (this question is most likely a public display of ignorance) 8-)

In this scenario- yes. I presented this jig based largely on the fact of the OP commenting that he started w/slightly oversized panels and was wanting to now cut them all to the exact dimension. This jig allows one to do that- simply, quickly, w/precision.

3. Is the white board attached permanently to the brown panel? What is your method of attaching it?

yes. We want the white board/brown panel relationship to not change. Instead, we'll change the location of the material being cut. Obviously, one could design this to keep the material indexed in the same place every time and then move the cut line- same principle, same results.

Attach the white board any way you'd like: nails, screws, bubble guy (just kidding), t-nuts w/screws (for future mods, this is probably best). There's nothing sacred about how to attach it- we just want it secured.

4. What method do you use to quickly ensure that the "stops" are adjusted to exactly the same length to ensure an accurately square cut? I would probably use a tape measure on both but I know you probably have a faster and more accurately way of doing it.

Tape measure works great. I use the story stick shown in pic two. This story stick is made to set-up for the keeper material to be either on the left side of the saw blade, or, on the right side. In this case, I use the left-alignment.

One simple way is to place your material on the jig, set the track on top of it against the stop-bolts, shuffle the material to where the cut-line is, spring-clamp it in place while you adjust the stop-sticks up to the material, remove the clamps- you should now be adjusted.


thanks!
Jim
Great questions, Jim; hope I answered them...
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Last edited by bumpnstump; 06-05-2017 at 11:48 AM.
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  #18  
Old 06-05-2017, 11:46 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
It does seem like a good starting point. I do like the parallel edge guides, which I think you are calling "push sticks" in this example. I assume you set them individually or do you use a story stick of sorts to set them from the front? Does the work sit against the knock bolts as well? This also brings to mind the thought of a row of knock bolts along the bottom running on a line perpendicular to the two you have on the front. I also like the idea of having a definite cut-line as the edge of the board.
I use a custom made story stick to set the push sticks. (see pic two in post before this one, response to JamesMac).

Only way the knock bolts would work is if they happened to be parallel to the track cut-edge; hence, the moveable push-sticks.
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2017, 01:32 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Rick,

Nice set-up. Am I guessing correctly that you are using this in the absence of an EZ1 or PBB? Another way to do this would be to "borrow" an idea from the other guys

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQJhVMUYmmQ

My concept for a PBB used a moveable fence (mounted in t-tracks) that could be squared to the track - and also moved closer/further away depending on the width of the part being cut. Using the dogs would require that the EZ rail be used without the left ACE - not a problem for you with your modified baseplate or for those using a home-made "solid" ACE a la Dik. This also frees up the edge groove for the attachment of a handle which make it easy to maneuver the rail between cuts.

I don't have one of the fancy new sliders - still working with a 25+ year old Ryobi chop saw which takes up a lot of room and time to set up- and so my cross-cutting is mostly done on my table saw, either using an Incra miter gauge or a sled, both of which have stops to allow for cutting accurate multiples.
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  #20  
Old 06-05-2017, 02:56 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
Rick,

Nice set-up. Am I guessing correctly that you are using this in the absence of an EZ1 or PBB? Another way to do this would be to "borrow" an idea from the other guys

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQJhVMUYmmQ

My concept for a PBB used a moveable fence (mounted in t-tracks) that could be squared to the track - and also moved closer/further away depending on the width of the part being cut. Using the dogs would require that the EZ rail be used without the left ACE - not a problem for you with your modified baseplate or for those using a home-made "solid" ACE a la Dik. This also frees up the edge groove for the attachment of a handle which make it easy to maneuver the rail between cuts.

I don't have one of the fancy new sliders - still working with a 25+ year old Ryobi chop saw which takes up a lot of room and time to set up- and so my cross-cutting is mostly done on my table saw, either using an Incra miter gauge or a sled, both of which have stops to allow for cutting accurate multiples.
Parf dogs! totally cool set up!

Yes, the jig I presented earlier is the same concept. Since, primarily, all sawing is a manipulation of straight lines, and those lines derived from two points, all that is required is to determine how/when/where/what kind of points do I want to deal with in a given situation. Most situations initially benefit from: ease of use/understanding; simplicity; repeatability; sometimes, unlimited cutting ability/sometimes limited cutting ability; etc.

In my case, I try to keep it as simple as possible, and as cost effective as possible- I'm wanting to offer something that most workshops can incorporate easily and inexpensively (I pretty much have zero expendable income, and I'm guessing others are in the same boat....). Hence, the 'stripped-down' version of the cutting table.

There are a couple of simple mods to this cutting table that move the concept shown, up to the next level; beyond that, it becomes personal variations on a theme.
Rick

ps Super PBB set-up you have! Might be nice sometime to have you post a project using it.... yes?
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