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  #11  
Old 10-15-2009, 01:09 AM
Ken Ken is online now
 
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Power Bench VS. MFT The Showdown Part 2


A Little History: My first use of a guide was when I was a kid 30 years ago. I used a circular saw with a straight piece of wood as a guide. Eventually I got an aluminum guide similar to the cheap ones they sell in the Borgs today, but of a much better quality. In my late teens the circular saw fell by the wayside in favor of the table saw for any thing other then construction work. I pretty much stuck with the table saw until a few years ago when at first I just wanted a better way to break down sheet goods. It was never any fun to rip and then cross cut sheets by myself especially without proper support. I do not consider roller stands proper support. I have had them tip over at the worst time and the roller can pull the materials off course, the Rigid flip stands are better but still anything less then a fixed outfeed table is not a good option for heavy work on the table saw.

My first change a few years ago was to go back to the circular saw and plywood straight edges. I could get good results but it was far from ideal. Next I gave the All-In-One guide a try. They made a base for the circular saw that rode on the guide. There were a few nagging things that lingered on. Zero clearance was not provided so the cut quality suffered, no square, and the need to always figure the offset. I did make a zero clearance base and that gave me the cut quality that I was looking for but I still wanted something better, a complete system, I just did not know at the time that such a thing existed.

Even though I could improvise and always do good work with whatever was on hand I still had the desire to work with tools that made things easier and most of all safe. I had made a nice set of “bookcase” type storage up a flight of stairs that started in our kitchen so that my wife could have some pantry type storage. I did this with the All-In-One guide, a circular saw, and a router the results were great. I felt that my many years of a perfect safety record on the table saw were bound to come to an end at some point. Then I stumbled upon Festool while searching the web for something better then what I had. They do make amazing products and I bought a OF1010 router, TS55 saw, and a few assorted rails. Things went great and I was happy with the results on sheet goods. Thats when I realized that I was having much more fun woodworking without having to run to the table saw all the time.

After a while I wanted to move my hard wood cutting off of the table saw to. This is where I started running into problems. I thought along with all the propaganda that the MFT would be the answer so I bit the bullet and bought an MFT3. It did have it's merits and is an excellent cutting and clamping table with enough capacity for cabinet construction. It is when you get to the smaller hardwood pieces that the trouble begins like I previously stated with the flex in the rails and the hinge. It became clear that even though it was close things still could be better. It was only a few months after getting the MFT3 that I discovered the EZ Smart. I was on the FOG forum and followed a link to SMC where I found the EZ forum. I followed it and learned as much as I could about the products and what could be done with them. I also did a lot of thinking about ways that I could use them and customize them for my needs so that they would work like I do. I like the fact that the system is modular, extendable, and able to be re-purposed for specific needs. Customizing my own tool to the task at hand is something that has a very strong appeal to me. So I made the switch from Festool to EZ and have not looked back. As a side note eBay is great and I lost no money at all in the switch.
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  #12  
Old 10-15-2009, 02:10 AM
LarryS LarryS is offline
 
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My point was that there are no EZ products in stores up here in Canada. Most tools I buy I like to pick up and examine before I buy, along with a lot of thorough research on line. It wasn't easy buying a $xxxx tool, sight unseen.

That is why I liked Kens post so much as he compares the two tools I was considering and pointed out the pros and cons of each. Mind you I had already made a purchase, and his post only confirmed what I already had learned from reading a lot of posts here and at the old SMC forum.


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  #13  
Old 10-16-2009, 05:50 AM
Bruce Benjamin Bruce Benjamin is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryS View Post
My point was that there are no EZ products in stores up here in Canada. Most tools I buy I like to pick up and examine before I buy, along with a lot of thorough research on line. It wasn't easy buying a $xxxx tool, sight unseen.

Larry
To my knowledge there are no stores here in the U.S. where you can handle the EZ products before you buy them either. There may be a couple somewhere but none that I know of. I agree that this is a drawback for many people. I'm like you in that I like to handle something before I buy it. But in these days of internet everything it's getting harder and harder to do that.

One thing is for sure, for people who are on the fence about whether or not the EZ tools are well built, seeing them first hand and handling them should put their fears to rest. Hopefully EZ tools will eventually become popular enough to find them in some tool retailer's brick and mortar stores but I'd bet that will be a while from now. The tool world's mentality is still focused on the old school technology, (Tablesaws) and probably will be for a long time to come. On the other hand, can you imagine how overwhelmed Dino and his crew would be if Sears suddenly decided to carry the full line of EZ Smart tools in all of their stores? In time though...

Bruce
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  #14  
Old 10-16-2009, 08:09 AM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Benjamin View Post
To my knowledge there are no stores here in the U.S. where you can handle the EZ products before you buy them either. There may be a couple somewhere but none that I know of. I agree that this is a drawback for many people. I'm like you in that I like to handle something before I buy it. But in these days of internet everything it's getting harder and harder to do that.

One thing is for sure, for people who are on the fence about whether or not the EZ tools are well built, seeing them first hand and handling them should put their fears to rest. Hopefully EZ tools will eventually become popular enough to find them in some tool retailer's brick and mortar stores but I'd bet that will be a while from now. The tool world's mentality is still focused on the old school technology, (Tablesaws) and probably will be for a long time to come. On the other hand, can you imagine how overwhelmed Dino and his crew would be if Sears suddenly decided to carry the full line of EZ Smart tools in all of their stores? In time though...

Bruce
First, the second paragraph, +1!

Now, to the first paragraph. I found the EZ before I ever ordered it, I had to SEE it. I went to my local woodworking show, and was able to see it, and thought I could walk out with it. That was when I found what you buy at the wood shows (except small items) you tend to get shipped to you (major letdown). I ordered my next stuff, directly from them via ebay. Now last year Dino was working on having someone display them at shows, maybe he can say who, so those who want hands on, can. Otherwise we have lost the Sawmill posts, but not the blogs, or the You Tube videos (less then hands on, but still there).
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  #15  
Old 07-16-2016, 02:08 AM
Talbert McMullin Talbert McMullin is offline
 
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Default Used Eurekazone System for years

I have been using the Eurekazone System for years and it has made all the difference in the world. I have tried the Festool System also and it's pretty good, but the Eurekazone tracks are better....far, far, better. The first time I used the Festool system, I liked the saw, but the tracks just felt strange. Maybe it was the saw, but I decided to keep my Eurekazone system. It just works.

Dewalt is also a nice system. I would like to team up that saw with the Eurekazone rails one of these days. Now THAT would be the way to go!
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  #16  
Old 07-16-2016, 02:30 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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The extra linkage in the DeWalt blade lowering mechanism looks like a clever way to deal with the blade clearancing problem of the rear pivot plunge action of the eurosaws. Though it sure seems like the DeWalt failed to get anyones interest. Marketing, I guess.
I've used the Makita and Festool along with the EZ. Never even thought about the tracks on the eurosaws, sure they're more flexible, but the cut straight. Liked the quality and features of the saws.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talbert McMullin View Post
I have been using the Eurekazone System for years and it has made all the difference in the world. I have tried the Festool System also and it's pretty good, but the Eurekazone tracks are better....far, far, better. The first time I used the Festool system, I liked the saw, but the tracks just felt strange. Maybe it was the saw, but I decided to keep my Eurekazone system. It just works.

Dewalt is also a nice system. I would like to team up that saw with the Eurekazone rails one of these days. Now THAT would be the way to go!
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2016, 10:59 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Festool was my first introduction to tablesaw alternatives. While I was impressed, I was put off by their proprietary approach and price. So, I began looking for an alternative. EZSMART wasn't even on the radar but then I ran across Dino's videos on YouTube. I saw a real carpenter offering a "real world" solution. It was affordable, accurate, repeatable, and mobile. Festool only hits 3 out of 4. EZSMART hit all four and let me integrate the tools I already had. That alone saved me over $1000!

After a few weeks of watching and reading everything I could find, I took the plunge. Glad I did! I make a living with my tools and use EZSmart nearly everyday.

So, why EZ over other systems for me?
1. Save money. Smaller initial investment, and use tools I already own.
2. Learn fast. I quickly modified the saws and routers I've always used for use with EZSmart. Watched videos and read and re-read posts on this forum.
3. Diversify and expand. EZSmart sells all kinds of parts and pieces to make custom tables, jigs, and accessories so you can do your specific job your way. Try calling Festool, or any other brand, and telling them you need a one-off jig or custom anything.

I'm not a fanboy who collects toys to play with on the weekend. I only buy a tool when I can make a profit using it, and the quicker the better. That's why I chose EZSmart.

I could go on but I think I've made my point.
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  #18  
Old 10-13-2016, 02:07 PM
Brian Kincaid Brian Kincaid is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Talbert McMullin View Post
Dewalt is also a nice system. I would like to team up that saw with the Eurekazone rails one of these days. Now THAT would be the way to go!
Dewalt saw works very well on the EZ rails and bridge.
The Saw has 2 channels in its base. The inside channel is for their rail, and works pretty well with EZ rail with some adjustments. The outside channel is for compatibility with euro rails (Makita, Festool, etc).

The Dewalt saw base channel needs to be tightened up a little bit from its base configuration to use with the EZ rail. I just added some wraps of painters tape around the adjustment knob and that's done.

There will be a ~1" (?) gap between the EZ rail and the saw blade cutline. My solution was to buy a Festool rip guide for the TS55 and install it all the way against the saw, so that the blade plunges through the guide. With the addition of a thin ~1/16" spacer to contact the work, it makes a solid zero-clearance insert that can easily be removed for off rail or dewalt rail work.

I use the Dewalt 99% of the time now mostly because of its blade depth adjustment and dust collection. The remaining 1% is the 10 1/4" Maktia 5104 for extra cut depth capacity. I still have a Makita 5057 that I really like but don't have much use for so it is stored in a box.

-Brian

Last edited by Brian Kincaid; 10-13-2016 at 02:14 PM.
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