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  #1  
Old 10-21-2018, 12:31 AM
nealf2 nealf2 is offline
 
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Location: Michigan
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Default Cutting of stair tread bullnose

I am putting oak treads down on stairs. I have to cut off the 1 inch of plywood overhang.

What is the best way to cut off the inch off of stair treads? I have tried putting down a 3 foot track, holding it with one foot, and cutting with my circular saw, but it doesnt seem right.

Any suggestions?
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  #2  
Old 10-21-2018, 10:00 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Lexington, Ky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealf2 View Post
I am putting oak treads down on stairs. I have to cut off the 1 inch of plywood overhang.

What is the best way to cut off the inch off of stair treads? I have tried putting down a 3 foot track, holding it with one foot, and cutting with my circular saw, but it doesnt seem right.

Any suggestions?
Any chance for a pic? or a bit more description of your specific situation? Stair treads are framed a bit differently from one job to another; I'm not seeing in my mind's eye what you are describing yours as.
Rick
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  #3  
Old 10-21-2018, 10:08 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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This might be a crazy idea, but here it is:

Get a few wide fender washers, put an edge of each one in a vice or a vice-grip (??) and bend the edge over to about 90 degrees - maybe a 45 degree angle would be enough. These will act as screw-in clamps. Maybe with a trip to your local hardware store you can find something similar - a screw down clip of some sort - that is pre-fabricated.

Remove the anti-chip edge from the non-cut side of the guide rail.

Put the guide rail in place, hook the fender washer lip into the groove on the non-cut side of the guide rail, and screw them down. Be VERY gentle with the force of the screw so you don't bend the aluminum groove edge!!

You might need to shim the non-cut side of the guide rail up a bit to maintain the correct height without the anti-chip edge.
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  #4  
Old 10-21-2018, 02:20 PM
Todd Todd is offline
 
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Neil,

I did a few sets of stairs at my house a few years ago. I replaced the carpet with 1 1/8" solid oak treads. I had to cut the nose off of each tread so that I could run the riser up underneath the tread. I used a EZ track. I screwed through the track on each end. It leaves a hole but does not hurt the track. The circular saw would not go all the way to the wall so I finished with a jig saw and a chisel. I needed the chisel because the tread went into the stringer. To fill the hole in the stringer I glued a piece of the tread nose that was cut off. I then used some wood filler on the stringer, sanded and then painted. I did the risers with 1/4" baltic birch. The first step is 1 1/8" taller than the rest and the top step is 1 1/8" short than the rest. Hope this helps.

Todd
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  #5  
Old 10-21-2018, 06:24 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Todd,
Where and how exactly did you put a screw through the guide rail? It seems that a screw head on the surface would interfere with the base as it glides.

Do you drill a small hole for the screw through the entire guide rail, and then a larger hole on the top so the head goes all the way down to the lower portion of the center channel?

Ken
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  #6  
Old 10-21-2018, 11:25 PM
Todd Todd is offline
 
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Ken,

You can slightly countersink a #4 or #5 screw into one of the troughs in the track. You do not need a large screw because there is not much pressure on the track.

Todd
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  #7  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:27 PM
Dino Dino is online now
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Default No more Fiat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
Todd,
Where and how exactly did you put a screw through the guide rail? It seems that a screw head on the surface would interfere with the base as it glides.

Do you drill a small hole for the screw through the entire guide rail, and then a larger hole on the top so the head goes all the way down to the lower portion of the center channel?

Ken
I was going to say...anywhere.
The advantage of double wall ( Box construction or tube extrusions)
are too many to list. I remember Burt making his own setups
by cutting the ez tracks with...what else? another ez track.

Once I had to trim the siding of a house to install trim for the windows.
I secure the white edge with tape and screw the edge to avoid drilling the guide , Good to have many options.

I hope to start a custom shop in NJ soon and use ONLY custom ez setups.
Like Multiple bridges with 3-4 saws and one lever.
Like the tunnel routing with a saw and 2 routers at once...
A new start that was fun and exciting.
Any body remembers the molder? where we had 5-6 tools working inline?


Of subject but is good to bring back ez memories....
btw, the Fiat was given to a friend for full restoration.
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  #8  
Old 10-22-2018, 04:42 PM
aaronp aaronp is offline
 
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I think the EZ track is a little overkill in this particular situation. Just tack down a piece of straight enough wood as a guide with couple small nails so that you can use the saw directly on the step surface. Leave 1/8 in. hanging out so you can use a router with a flush bit (the one with a bearing) and you should have a nice clean finish. You will have to finish the cut to the wall with a pull saw (hand saw) and a bit of sanding, though.
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  #9  
Old 10-22-2018, 09:15 PM
nealf2 nealf2 is offline
 
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Thanks, Todd. That is exactly what I needed to know.

Holding the track down with one foot just did not inspire confidence. I had thought of screwing down the track but wasn’t sure.

I have already put on oak plank flooring on both floors above and below the stair. So I expect they will even out.
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  #10  
Old 10-22-2018, 10:05 PM
Dino Dino is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealf2 View Post
Thanks, Todd. That is exactly what I needed to know.

Holding the track down with one foot just did not inspire confidence. I had thought of screwing down the track but wasn’t sure.

I have already put on oak plank flooring on both floors above and below the stair. So I expect they will even out.
two small nails at the edges will do the job.
for heavy duty applications, make a large hole on the upper wall of the track
and a smaller hole on the bottom wall of the track.
one 6d or 4d nail is fine.
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