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  #31  
Old 05-01-2014, 04:49 PM
jgowrie jgowrie is offline
 
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Location: Suffern, NY
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Default Another benefit of pocket screws over other joinery

Would be that it does the clamping for you instead of the need to set up clamps and wait for glue to dry. This saves time and if you're charging for your time, that means mo' money, mo' money
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  #32  
Old 05-01-2014, 06:58 PM
Lex Lex is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Florida
Posts: 126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustin B View Post
Lex if you like box joints check out this jig.

http://woodgears.ca/box_joint/jig_improved.html

This guy has also done some interesting joint testing (not prompted by any manufacture).

http://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/

And this one is interesting, I'd bet the unnamed dowel jig is the Dowelmax.
http://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/dowel.html

I've got the cheaper Jessem dowel jig and find it works really quite well.

Oh and this test he did had results I didn't expect.

https://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/glue_methods.html
Oh yeah, I'm familiar with those. I've followed Matthias' posts and videos for years. Always entertaining and informative. I like his techno-geek approach to woodworking. I've considered making his box joint jig, but my Incra fence system on my router table works so well that I have no desire to make them any other way now.
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  #33  
Old 05-01-2014, 07:05 PM
Lex Lex is offline
 
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Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgowrie View Post
Would be that it does the clamping for you instead of the need to set up clamps and wait for glue to dry. This saves time and if you're charging for your time, that means mo' money, mo' money
I've found it necessary to securely clamp the piece up when I drive the pocket hole screws, but you're right that once the screws are driven, you can then remove the clamps. There's no need to wait for the glue to dry first. My issue with pocket hole screws is being sure that the screw is properly driven and not over-driven, which is all too easy to do with power drivers. I made a mitered frame for one of my larger raised beds (for my sweet potatoes) so that I could sit on the edge while tending the garden. I used dowels and glue for the miter joints, and attached it to the raised bed frame with pocket holes and construction adhesive. I over-drove several of the screws and they burst through the top of the frame. Oh well. I backed them out a bit and plugged the hole with a dollop of construction adhesive. I can't really blame the tool or materials for that problem, it's strictly my own fault and no one else's.
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  #34  
Old 05-01-2014, 07:35 PM
jgowrie jgowrie is offline
 
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Location: Suffern, NY
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One of the reason I like using an impact driver for pocket screws is that the RPM are generally approaching that of a corded drill, which is what you want so the auger tip drills into the mating piece, but once the impact kicks in it slows the RPMs down substantially. As soon as the impact kicks in I release the trigger and then use the variable trigger to ease the screw in so it's properly set.. never busted through or snapped a screw yet. If you haven't tried an impact driver it's worth borrowing one to see if it's comfortable for you.
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  #35  
Old 05-01-2014, 09:44 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lex View Post
I've found it necessary to securely clamp the piece up when I drive the pocket hole screws, but you're right that once the screws are driven, you can then remove the clamps. There's no need to wait for the glue to dry first. My issue with pocket hole screws is being sure that the screw is properly driven and not over-driven, which is all too easy to do with power drivers. I made a mitered frame for one of my larger raised beds (for my sweet potatoes) so that I could sit on the edge while tending the garden. I used dowels and glue for the miter joints, and attached it to the raised bed frame with pocket holes and construction adhesive. I over-drove several of the screws and they burst through the top of the frame. Oh well. I backed them out a bit and plugged the hole with a dollop of construction adhesive. I can't really blame the tool or materials for that problem, it's strictly my own fault and no one else's.
I found that it's much easier to clamp a stop across the panel for the mating part to butt against, with the stop behind the direction of the screw. This way, the force from the screw pulls the mating part against the stop and accurately locates it. It takes a minute or so to clamp the stops, but you can then work your way down the assembly and have the parts exactly on location. Another plus is that you can put a little extra force in an area where the part may have a slight bow and straighten it out as you're driving the screw. I bought one of the original aluminum Kreg jigs probably close to 30 years ago based on watching Marc demonstrate it at the Woodworking Show here in Baltimore, still have it although I use one of the newer ones as it allows for adjustment for material thickness. I've always had good luck driving the screws with a battery screwdriver as I feel that this has more than enough torque so seat the screw without stripping it out, although I do go down the part as a final step and check for correct tightness using a hand screwdriver, you kind of develop a feel for the correct tightening torque over the years. The only time I use an impact driver is when I'm using long screws in 2x4's.

Tom
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