The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > How-To

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-15-2016, 08:03 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default EZ helper.....

OK...., I realize that this is probably not the usage that EZ had in mind for their EZ track, but, hey...... if it works?

Been tiling the new bathroom using large format tiles (LFT), 18 x 36. Crosscuts I can do with my DeWalt wet saw; long cuts, no go. (24" cut capacity.) For most of the long cuts, I've been using the EZ-1, w/a segmented diamond dry-cut blade in the saw. Takes forever to make a cut, but it works; leaves a bit of chip-out at the cut edge, but most of that can be hidden.

After making all of the larger cuts, I needed to rip the cut-offs to a consistent width in order to use them for the baseboard. I really didn't want to eat up half of a day doing it on the EZ-1 w/the dry-cut blade; plus, I wanted minimal chip-out. What to do?

The pics show my final "EZ" solution. After removing the wet saw rolling carriage, I laid a couple of short B2Bs across the guide rails, holding them in place using EZ clamps. Then, using my edge guide/clamp/thingies in the side slot of EZ track, I fastened the track parallel to the wet saw blade at the desired cut distance. The intent was to use the raised portion of the EZ track as my 'fence', w/the tile sitting on the track. I would then push the tiles thru the wet saw blade, like one would do when ripping wood using a radial arm saw. The 'fence' distance left quite a gap between the edge of the track and the blade, so I filled in the gap w/a piece of EZ T-track extrusion, holding it against the edge of the EZ track using a couple of EZ stops made out of EZ raised connector pieces.

How'd it work? Awesome! No flex; no wobble; no chipping; no fuss; no nada! What would have taken a couple of hours doing it w/a dry-cut blade took me ~40 minutes. I had absolute control.
Thanks, again, EZ.
Rick
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	wet saw mod 2.jpg
Views:	165
Size:	105.3 KB
ID:	6919   Click image for larger version

Name:	wet saw mod 1.jpg
Views:	185
Size:	98.7 KB
ID:	6920   Click image for larger version

Name:	wet saw mod6.jpg
Views:	156
Size:	100.4 KB
ID:	6921   Click image for larger version

Name:	wet saw mod 5.jpg
Views:	165
Size:	100.3 KB
ID:	6922  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-16-2016, 12:15 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 247
Default

Rick,

You can always be counted on to come up with imaginative and innovative ways to make use of the EZ tools. Great idea (as always).
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-16-2016, 12:51 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

It works and that is all that counts!


Burt
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-16-2016, 02:00 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Thanks, guys.

yep, I'm wondering if the Space Shuttle program should start sending along a few EZ extrusions on their space missions, just in case they need to jury-rig something..... lol
Rick
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-17-2016, 01:30 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,238
Default

That's a good idea. I was in the same situation when cutting some large porcelain floor tiles. I made up a rip quide for my little 4" wet masonry saw (they look like mini skilsaws). Your idea would have worked better
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-19-2016, 09:45 AM
mrstop mrstop is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 33
Default

Very good idea. I had a similar problem a few weeks ago on a bathroom addition. The tile I was using was not only long, but very thick and strong. I ended up ruining several pieces due to the tile breaking as I ran long rips. My solutions was to cut the tile in several passes in order to better control the break. Your solution looks much better!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-19-2016, 12:18 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
That's a good idea. I was in the same situation when cutting some large porcelain floor tiles. I made up a rip quide for my little 4" wet masonry saw (they look like mini skilsaws). Your idea would have worked better
With so many large format tiles being used, it's got to be an issue for all tile guys. Bridge cutters are large and expensive; doing it by hand is risky. I'm surprised DeWalt hasn't come out with a simple add-on conversion similar to what I did. The tiles I'm using are 18 x 36, but they come in a 24 x 48 format also- would be a monster bridge saw needed to cut; using my EZ adaption, it's doable. The only potential issue might be the mounting for the overhead motor limiting rips to the left side of the blade to 13", which still allows for ripping 24" wide material down the middle.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-19-2016, 12:29 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstop View Post
Very good idea. I had a similar problem a few weeks ago on a bathroom addition. The tile I was using was not only long, but very thick and strong. I ended up ruining several pieces due to the tile breaking as I ran long rips. My solutions was to cut the tile in several passes in order to better control the break. Your solution looks much better!
I tried the several-passes method using the dry-cut method on the EZ-1 and found that it did not go any faster than single-step thru-cutting. The multiple passes also increased my potential for chip-out, even tho I had saw control due to riding on the EZ track. If I went too fast, the saw would climb out of the cut and tilt the blade a bit. When dry-cutting, I minimized the breakage/support issue by cutting the tiles over a piece of 1/2" sheet rock. When I started ripping the tiles on the wet saw, I made sure the aluminum extrusions extended far enough past the saw blade to catch the cut-offs. Doing it this way, the narrowest, longest, unbroken cut-off I got was 1/8" x 36"- that is impressive! and attests to a working solution; the rigidity of the EZ extrusions is key to making this procedure work.

After having done this set-up the first time, I've since had to re-set it up for additional cuts; set-up goes lots quicker the second time.....
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.