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Old 03-27-2018, 01:56 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Default Kerf BendingPlywood

I saw the impressive video of Dino kerfing a piece of wood like crazy with the squaring handle and a piece of track. That is all well and good, but how do you do that if you want the kerf cuts at equal increments so that you can do a relatively smooth plywood bend?

Like if I were to use this calculator it would tell me how deep, and at what frequency to cut kerfs for what blade width.

https://www.blocklayer.com/kerf-spacingeng.aspx
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:06 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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I would make a spacer to fit the kerf and move the track to the next location.
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:17 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dik Harrison View Post
I would make a spacer to fit the kerf and move the track to the next location.
Let's say the distance between kerfs is 1-7/8. So I make a spacer that is 1-7/8 thick, or do I make as many spacers as I will have kerfs?

Set a stop and put the wood against it and make a cut. Then leapfrog the stop over the spacer? Or set a stop and keep adding spacers?
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:06 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Spacing is not super critical (although 1-7/8" seems a little high). Make a spacer with width equal to the distance BETWEEN the kerfs. Start with the wood under the track, projection equal to the spacing - use the spacer, touching the end of the wood and the outside edge of the teeth. Make the first cut, move the wood to the right, set the spacer in place and back the wood up until it hits the teeth again. If you want to speed it up, glue a strip on the bottom of the spacer that's the width of the kerf; make the first kerf, move the wood to the right, drop the strip in the groove and the back the material up until the spacer hits the teeth. I used to do this on the radial arm saw by making a mark on a piece of masking tape stuck to the fence and just moving the material and lining up the mark and edge of the kerf by eye - maybe you can do the same on your set-up. Quick operation on the RAS, one hand to move the material and the other to move the carriage back and forth - maybe not so easy with the track.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:21 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Originally Posted by tomp913 View Post
I used to do this on the radial arm saw by making a mark on a piece of masking tape stuck to the fence and just moving the material and lining up the mark and edge of the kerf by eye - maybe you can do the same on your set-up. Quick operation on the RAS, one hand to move the material and the other to move the carriage back and forth - maybe not so easy with the track.
As soon as you said RAS it came to me. I don't need a spacer I just need an arrow. If I set the wood to the position of the first cut and set my "arrow" down pointing at the end of the wood, after each cut all I have to do is move the kerf to the arrow. And the arrow can be a piece of wood, or just a piece of tape. This works under the bridge. Not sure how I would do the same thing on the cabinet maker, but maybe I could put a mark on the saw base, and line that up with the last kerf as I move over the wood.

Great ideas, if I get some shop time tomorrow I will give them a try.
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Old 03-27-2018, 06:47 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Without knowing your set-up, but anything that gives you a point of reference will work. A word of caution - it's easy to make the parts so that the saw kerf telegraphs to the front (convex) face, more of a problem as the depth of the kerf gets closer to the face. You wind up with a faceted look that's hard to sand out without going through the thin face veneer used on current plywood. But that's kind of a trade-off if you're looking for a relatively tight bend - not a problem for us as most of the time we were putting laminate on the part to finish. I do remember one time making a form - and something about mixing a thin paste (glue and sawdust maybe?) to stabilize the bend, but it's been 25+ years ago now. If you're looking for a stained and finished part, maybe think about putting veneer on to finish.
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Old 03-27-2018, 07:21 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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I am going to try for a small drum top table. Prove it can be done
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