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Old 02-05-2010, 12:55 AM
Dino Dino is offline
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Exclamation Powerbench videos.

By Dik Harrison.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLwfUluwj4I


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiJJQp1EPKI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXV2XJTwn9Y





thanks.
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Last edited by Dino; 04-28-2010 at 09:45 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-15-2010, 10:26 AM
amascola amascola is offline
 
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Default which side do you recommend the squaring stops? Close handle side or far?

Hi all,
In using the powerbench with bridge I see several different setups with respect to the squaring fence. The one I most commonly see places the squaring stops nearest the user near the handle as shown in the video below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOggc...eature=related

Alternatively I see the squaring stops placed on the far side of the bench on the SME opposite the handle as shown below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLwfUluwj4I

What are the arguments for each placement? I would have thought as in my previous post that you would want to push the material into the stops like in a western saw type miter box to keep it square throughout the cutting as the direction of the saw and the spin of the blade might push the material away from the squaring fence. I can see though that the bridge may help hold the material in place and also in some of the videos like those of Peter West the user holds the far end of the material also as shown here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1VHiB6_vOI&feature=fvw

What do experienced users think about pros and cons of each position?
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  #3  
Old 05-15-2010, 12:31 PM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Default

Part of it is just due to the setup, and the EZ, being bidirectional.

But if your working with a large, single sheet (example, width of your table), then far away from you, they help line everything up. While on a narrow table setup, since your pushing into the stuff being cut, it helps to have stops across from you to keep everything straight. (see the EZ radial arm saw video's)

Middle of the road sized pieces, or those where one ends in the middle of the table, your better off with the stops/squares, on the side by you. Dino had a video, showing a sliding stop that he made to ride along the fence. This allowed him to stop the (he was cutting the slick plastic, if I remember correctly) slick workpiece from sliding forward.

Now, if you have a tilting setup, then you use the squares/stops, on the side that is the lower half.
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Old 05-15-2010, 06:43 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Anthony,

I think a lot of it is smply what you are comfortable with. Like you, I feel like I have much better control of a board I am crosscutting it if I am pushing it against the fence. I'm exerting all the force in one direction - pushing the saw and the board. A negative is that you find yourself running back and forth to the handle.

When you use the squaring stops nearest the handle, you can stand in one spot do the cut and move the handle. I feel awkward holding the wood to the fence and pushing into the cut. Dino and some of the others on the forum are very comfortable with this approach.

I've done some experimenting with adding a mid-table fence for crosscutting. Some of these have worked better than others. The problem is they get in the way of cross cuts.


Burt
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  #5  
Old 09-01-2010, 12:44 AM
suobs suobs is offline
 
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I'm looking at the video above "A Better Look at the Bridge" and it shows a bridge and track going up and down, ready to crosscut a sheet of plywood. That's great, but if the bottom of the plywood is flush with the top of the SME that is holding the bridge (as shown in the video), and if the cut piece is also has to be right up against the SME to keep the sheet square, how do you avoid cutting into the SME with the saw blade? The blade has to be set lower than the bottom of the cut piece. Am I missing something here?

Same thing in the "PBB vs. Table Saw" and other videos. It's just not clear how you avoid cutting into the extrusions.

I see the new table has a foam strip running under the saw blade, but I don't see that for sale. There was no solution to this problem previously? Do you guys just routinely cut into your aluminum extrusions when you're using a bridge?

Last edited by suobs; 09-01-2010 at 12:49 AM.
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  #6  
Old 09-01-2010, 02:32 AM
Ken Ken is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suobs View Post
I'm looking at the video above "A Better Look at the Bridge" and it shows a bridge and track going up and down, ready to crosscut a sheet of plywood. That's great, but if the bottom of the plywood is flush with the top of the SME that is holding the bridge (as shown in the video), and if the cut piece is also has to be right up against the SME to keep the sheet square, how do you avoid cutting into the SME with the saw blade? The blade has to be set lower than the bottom of the cut piece. Am I missing something here?

Same thing in the "PBB vs. Table Saw" and other videos. It's just not clear how you avoid cutting into the extrusions.

I see the new table has a foam strip running under the saw blade, but I don't see that for sale. There was no solution to this problem previously? Do you guys just routinely cut into your aluminum extrusions when you're using a bridge?
On the old benches you cut into the aluminum
It does not hurt anything. I only cut about 1/4" deeper the wood. Even if you mess up and cut through it there is no harm done.

I like the idea of not cutting the Aluminum see my EZ-One/Half thred for a different reason then you might think. Aluminum shavings get everywhere and are a pain to clean out of somebody's house. Another reason is that I use a few different saws so the renewable insert is the way to go.
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  #7  
Old 09-01-2010, 02:38 AM
Mel Beck Mel Beck is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suobs View Post
I'm looking at the video above "A Better Look at the Bridge" and it shows a bridge and track going up and down, ready to crosscut a sheet of plywood. That's great, but if the bottom of the plywood is flush with the top of the SME that is holding the bridge (as shown in the video), and if the cut piece is also has to be right up against the SME to keep the sheet square, how do you avoid cutting into the SME with the saw blade? We haven't been. The blade has to be set lower than the bottom of the cut piece. Am I missing something here? No the blade is set 1/8" deeper than material thickness. But the blade is always going in the same kerf, unless you move the bridge.

Same thing in the "PBB vs. Table Saw" and other videos. It's just not clear how you avoid cutting into the extrusions.

I see the new table has a foam strip running under the saw blade, but I don't see that for sale. There was no solution to this problem previously? I haven't seen it as a problem. Do you guys just routinely cut into your aluminum extrusions when you're using a bridge? Just the first cut
Then Dino, Dik, Burt, or someone else comes along, and the next thing you know there's an improvement. Like the new fence and the foam channel.

Hope this helps
Mel
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Old 09-01-2010, 09:11 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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soubs,

Here is a quick drawing of what happens with the old style PBB.

Click image for larger version

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If you set your blade to just cut through the work piece by 1/8" to 1/4", there is no real damage done to the top SME. Dino came up with the "Cutting beam" on the EZ-One to ease the concerns over cutting the top SME.
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  #9  
Old 09-01-2010, 05:24 PM
suobs suobs is offline
 
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AHA!

<More words to meet length limit>
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Old 09-01-2010, 06:01 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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That was theoretical, these are what you have after several years of use, with different saws, slightly different locations, and just plain mistakes in depth of cut.

Click image for larger version

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In the second photo, you can see that I have a 3/4" ply sub-top that the top SME is screwed to and a 3/4" ply sliding module that goes into the SME. The top SME is flush with the edge of the sub-top, not the side SME (which is mounted to the bench frame) thus making the top SME parallel to the side SME a bit difficult.

This is the EZ-One kerf.

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On the EZ-One, with the top SME mounted to the side SME (actually a Super SME) with the Squaring Stop/Connector, the two SME are automatically parallel.
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