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  #11  
Old 11-18-2013, 09:55 AM
TooManyToys TooManyToys is offline
 
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I'll agree to that too, Rick. After getting the Fein MM the RZ does not get as much use. But the RZ is still great when piloting off the hidden stud. I actually used both when cutting the wall for the towel project, RZ for the vertical cuts and the MM for the horizontal as the MM is much easier to control for a straight cut.
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  #12  
Old 11-18-2013, 10:18 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Part of the problem for me is that my walls are not just drywall but narrow drywall panels of some kind laid vertically and then with a layer of plaster. Thicker than normal drywall. They are more substantial than drywall but also harder to cut and finding studs with a regular studfinder never worked. I'm working on a second house (but not in winter) that also has atypical walls. Drywall over plaster in some cases. I do have a rockwell multitool that I've used quite a bit. I will try it on the next project. Next year's project most likely.
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  #13  
Old 11-18-2013, 12:20 PM
Tmyoung Tmyoung is offline
 
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Default Woodpecker

Hey Katie, I was going to get myself some of the Woodpecker box clamps. saw you have some of them. What do you think? I have lots of drawers to glue up thought they would help. I love all the other Woodpecker products I have.

Any advise?

Cheers, Tom
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  #14  
Old 11-18-2013, 12:53 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tmyoung View Post
Hey Katie, I was going to get myself some of the Woodpecker box clamps. saw you have some of them. What do you think? I have lots of drawers to glue up thought they would help. I love all the other Woodpecker products I have.

Any advise?

Cheers, Tom
Tom, I think they will work great for drawers. Better than anything I've tried. I got them for drawers and pocket holes. (I don't plan to make pocket hole drawers, but rather dovetails, pinned rabbets, or something like that). I did not like them for pocket holes though. The pock-it clamps from Rockler work best for that. Any other clamps allow the wood pieces to separate, slide, and then come back together wrecking the alignment.

You do have to fiddle around with them and watch the videos to figure out how they work. Plus, you can take the big knobs off and use screws if they get in the way with the piece you are clamping. But, I'd buy them again for the drawers since I plan to do quite a few. Also, I will use them in conjunction with the Pockit clamps for setting up other pieces.

If you get on the Woodpecker email list, they'll send you sale notices, etc. Of course, this is just to addict you to buying red shiny things . Right now I'm wondering if their latest one-time tool is worth it. A Paolini thickness gauge. A planer is in my future (maybe next summer). I'm not inclined to get most of their onetime tools since they are out of my price range.

Added: I notice they have the aluminum box clamps on sale. I got the plastic ones, which are about half the cost and come in a pair. I'd love the aluminum ones but the plastic work just as well from any reviews I read.
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Last edited by Goblu; 11-18-2013 at 01:00 PM.
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  #15  
Old 11-18-2013, 02:45 PM
philb philb is offline
 
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Default Save the money

Katie: I would save the money and not buy the thickness gauge. I have an Epilog laser and can make my own gauge for no money at all. I still do not use the gauge. I have a Wixey digital planer gauge attached to my planer. At the time the Wixey unit was $39. and hard to beat for performance and price. I have 4 Wixey digital products, I find them very valuable and precise. When you get your planer just have it outfitted with digital gauges or a Wixey add on.

Plug gauges or "go--no go" gauges are convenient and easy to use, but they do not tell you how much you have moved or how much you have yet to take off of the board. Digital units -- in a decimal format -- assist the woodworker in calculating what, how much, and what way, movement is needed.

I like the Woodpecker products, but there are many ways to do many of the same things with less expensive tools, or materials.

I hope that helps and not confuses.

Phillip
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  #16  
Old 11-18-2013, 03:34 PM
roy_okc roy_okc is offline
 
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Katie,

I second the Wixey planer gauge. Once set up, I have experienced very repeatable results that mirror my digital calipers.

Another thought I saw on a different site was to use a decent set of open end wrenches to measure. I haven't measured wrench openings with a caliper to see how well they match their stated size, but they would be consistent and might be good enough for many planing tasks.

(I just received my first box of pretty red things from Woodpeckers as I was typing this. I blame you for your post that had the little clamps. I bought some of those plus a bunch of their red Multi Knobs and a little bit of their combo track to determine suitability for a couple projects.)

Roy
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  #17  
Old 11-18-2013, 05:05 PM
Brian Kincaid Brian Kincaid is offline
 
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The last drywall I cut was to flush up a window for trim. I used a jigsaw with an old 'fine cut' blade, set it to the slowest speed. Dust collection was excellent!

Since I was going really slow I could flush-trim using the blade by running it along the face of the 2x4 stud. This is probably how the multi-tools work but I have never used one.

-Brian
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  #18  
Old 11-18-2013, 06:47 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
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Thanks for the advice about the Wixey gauge, PhilB and the seconding that info
RoyOK. I do now recall that they were mentioned in the past with planers. Anyway, I'm not ready to get one yet, and the one-time tools put you under time pressure. Most of the woodpecker best tools for beginners like me are not the one-time tools, but some of the old standby basics. I agree with you, PhilB about the woodpecker products. Plus, the wood thickness gauge was not even red

Roy_ok, I do like the open wrench idea a lot. More than one use for that tool. I'll check the wrenches I already have. I wouldn't mind taking them with me when I buy plywood just to easily see what size it really is. Maybe make sure it's uniform. Plus, there are metric sizes as well.

Thanks for the suggestion, Brian. I'm curious about the jigsaw. Does yours have built-in dust collection? Or just not spew as much as some of these other tools. The Rotozip is a kind of router style tool. They even used to sell regular looking router bits, though I never tried that. I would not have purchased it had it not been a garage sale. Next time I cut into drywall along a stud I'll try the jigsaw just to compare.

I got the multitool for grout removal (which I had a lot of) and putting in a tile countertop using epoxy grout, doing lots of stuff. Amazing! I really fell in love with it then. Also undercutting doors easily. Also, I cut a bunch of indoor-outdoor carpeting with it and it cut like butter (more love). I tried the carpet knife and it was a night and day difference. I will be sanding some corners of routed doors I made from cherry and hope it can get into those nooks and crannies easily. First--and last-- time using a shaper and using it freehand so a whole lot of burned wood (ugh) to deal with. No more shapers or big routers, instead, the SSRK.
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  #19  
Old 11-25-2013, 08:01 PM
Brian Kincaid Brian Kincaid is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
Thanks for the suggestion, Brian. I'm curious about the jigsaw. Does yours have built-in dust collection? Or just not spew as much as some of these other tools. The Rotozip is a kind of router style tool. They even used to sell regular looking router bits, though I never tried that. I would not have purchased it had it not been a garage sale. Next time I cut into drywall along a stud I'll try the jigsaw just to compare. .
Yeah I found a festool jigsaw locally for cheap so I upgraded. It has a dust shroud.
-Brian
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  #20  
Old 01-18-2014, 10:23 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
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Default Finally done

I'd hoped to finish this around Christmas, but had a horrible bug. Today is really the first day I felt up to it, so I finished this project.

From the photos it looks like I just put on the doors, but it involved building a frame inside the wall since I have 24" studs and the cabinet was only attached on one stud in the photos I posted above. Because of the doors, it needed framing on both sides. I didn't make the doors, but found them at the recycle place. They match my vanity doors, so I'm happy with the look.
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